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I'm implementing compareTo() method for a simple class such as this (to be able to use Collections.sort() and other goodies offered by the Java platform):

public class Metadata implements Comparable<Metadata> {
    private String name;
    private String value;

// Imagine basic constructor and accessors here
// Irrelevant parts omitted
}

I want the natural ordering for these objects to be: 1) sorted by name and 2) sorted by value if name is the same; both comparisons should be case-insensitive. For both fields null values are perfectly acceptable, so compareTo must not break in these cases.

The solution that springs to mind is along the lines of the following (I'm using "guard clauses" here while others might prefer a single return point, but that's beside the point):

// primarily by name, secondarily by value; null-safe; case-insensitive
public int compareTo(Metadata other) {
    if (this.name == null && other.name != null){
        return -1;
    }
    else if (this.name != null && other.name == null){
        return 1;
    }
    else if (this.name != null && other.name != null) {
        int result = this.name.compareToIgnoreCase(other.name);
        if (result != 0){
            return result;
        }
    }

    if (this.value == null) {
        return other.value == null ? 0 : -1;
    }
    if (other.value == null){
        return 1;
    }

    return this.value.compareToIgnoreCase(other.value);
}

This does the job, but I'm not perfectly happy with this code. Admittedly it isn't very complex, but is quite verbose and tedious.

The question is, how would you make this less verbose (while retaining the functionality)? Feel free to refer to Java standard libraries or Apache Commons if they help. Would the only option to make this (a little) simpler be to implement my own "NullSafeStringComparator", and apply it for comparing both fields?

Edits 1-3: Eddie's right; fixed the "both names are null" case above

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9 Answers 9

up vote 41 down vote accepted

I would implement a null safe comparator. There may be an implementation out there, but this is so straightforward to implement that I've always rolled my own.

Note: Your comparator above, if both names are null, won't even compare the value fields. I don't think this is what you want.

I would implement this with something like the following:

// primarily by name, secondarily by value; null-safe; case-insensitive
public int compareTo(final Metadata other) {
    int result = nullSafeStringComparator(this.name, other.name);
    if (result != 0) {
        return result;
    }

    return nullSafeStringComparator(this.value, other.value);
}

public static int nullSafeStringComparator(final String one, final String two) {
    if (one == null ^ two == null) {
        return (one == null) ? -1 : 1;
    }

    if (one == null && two == null) {
        return 0;
    }

    return one.compareToIgnoreCase(two);
}

EDIT: Fixed typos in code sample. That's what I get for not testing it first!

EDIT: Promoted nullSafeStringComparator to static.

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Your code is a little bit botched: final is not necessary here, the first character of the String class is capitalized in Java. Furthermore, return 1:-1 is not valid Java. I'd suggest a nested if (one == null) {if two == null) return 0; else return -1;}else{if (two == null) return 0; else return 1;} –  phihag Jan 26 '09 at 23:43
    
Yup. I should have tested it first. Now it's tested. :) –  Eddie Jan 26 '09 at 23:52
11  
Sweet use of XOR –  James McMahon Mar 30 '12 at 18:53
5  
@phihag - I know it's over 3 years, BUT... the final keyword is not truly necessary (Java code is already verbose as it is.) However, it does prevent reuse of parameters as local vars (a terrible coding practice.) As our collective understanding of software gets better over time, we know that things should be final/const/inmutable by default. So I prefer a bit extra verbosity in using final in parameter declarations (however trivial the function may be) to get inmutability-by-quasi-default.) The comprehensibility/maintainability overhead of it is negligible in the grand scheme of things. –  luis.espinal Jul 13 '12 at 14:04
1  
@James McMahon I have to disagree. Xor (^) could simply be replaced with not-equal (!=). It even compiles to the same byte code. The usage of != vs ^ is just a matter of taste and readability. So, judging by the fact that you were surprised I would say that it does not belong here. Use xor when you are trying to calculate a checksum. In most other cases (like this one) let's stick to !=. –  bvdb Jul 27 '14 at 11:32

Since it is not mentioned yet, you can simply use Apache Commons Lang:

result = ObjectUtils.compare(firstComparable, secondComparable)
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12  
This in my mind should be the accepted answer. –  Kong May 15 '13 at 0:30
2  
(@Kong: This takes care of null-safety but not case-insensitivity which was another aspect of the original question. Thus not changing the accepted answer.) –  Jonik Jul 27 '13 at 0:12
2  
Also, in my mind Apache Commons should not be the accepted answer in 2013. (Even if some subprojects are better maintained than others.) Guava can be used to achieve the same thing; see nullsFirst() / nullsLast(). –  Jonik Dec 18 '13 at 22:45

I always recommend using Apache commons since it will most likely be better than one you can write on your own. Plus you can then do 'real' work rather then reinventing.

The class you are interested in is the Null Comparator. It allows you to make nulls high or low. You also give it your own comparator to use when the two values are not null.

In your case you can have a static member variable that does the comparison and then your compareTo method just references that.

Somthing like

class Metadata implements Comparable<Metadata> {
private String name;
private String value;

static NullComparator nullAndCaseInsensitveComparator = new NullComparator(
		new Comparator<String>() {

			@Override
			public int compare(String o1, String o2) {
				// inputs can't be null
				return o1.compareToIgnoreCase(o2);
			}

		});

@Override
public int compareTo(Metadata other) {
	if (other == null) {
		return 1;
	}
	int res = nullAndCaseInsensitveComparator.compare(name, other.name);
	if (res != 0)
		return res;

	return nullAndCaseInsensitveComparator.compare(value, other.value);
}

}

Even if you decide to roll your own, keep this class in mind since it is very useful when ordering lists thatcontain null elements.

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Thanks, I was sort of hoping there would be something like this in Commons! In this case, however, I didn't end up using it: stackoverflow.com/questions/481813/… –  Jonik Feb 1 '09 at 11:40
    
Just realised your approach can be simplified by using String.CASE_INSENSITIVE_ORDER; see my edited follow-up answer. –  Jonik Feb 1 '09 at 16:18
    
+1 for not reinventing the wheel –  Stefan Haberl Jul 11 '12 at 12:56
    
This is good but the "if (other == null) {" check should not be there. The Javadoc for Comparable says that compareTo should throw a NullPointerException if other is null. –  Daniel Alexiuc Dec 13 '12 at 2:36

See the bottom of this answer for updated (2013) solution using Guava.


This is what I ultimately went with. It turned out we already had a utility method for null-safe String comparison, so the simplest solution was to make use of that. (It's a big codebase; easy to miss this kind of thing :)

public int compareTo(Metadata other) {
    int result = StringUtils.compare(this.getName(), other.getName(), true);
    if (result != 0) {
        return result;
    }
    return StringUtils.compare(this.getValue(), other.getValue(), true);
}

This is how the helper is defined (it's overloaded so that you can also define whether nulls come first or last, if you want):

public static int compare(String s1, String s2, boolean ignoreCase) { ... }

So this is essentially the same as Eddie's answer (although I wouldn't call a static helper method a comparator) and that of uzhin too.

Anyway, in general, I would have strongly favoured Patrick's solution, as I think it's a good practice to use established libraries whenever possible. (Know and use the libraries as Josh Bloch says.) But in this case that would not have yielded the cleanest, simplest code.

Edit (2009): Apache Commons Collections version

Actually, here's a way to make the solution based on Apache Commons NullComparator simpler. Combine it with the case-insensitive Comparator provided in String class:

public static final Comparator<String> NULL_SAFE_COMPARATOR 
    = new NullComparator(String.CASE_INSENSITIVE_ORDER);

@Override
public int compareTo(Metadata other) {
    int result = NULL_SAFE_COMPARATOR.compare(this.name, other.name);
    if (result != 0) {
        return result;
    }
    return NULL_SAFE_COMPARATOR.compare(this.value, other.value);
}

Now this is pretty elegant, I think. (Just one small issue remains: the Commons NullComparator doesn't support generics, so there's an unchecked assignment.)

Update (2013): Guava version

Nearly 5 years later, here's how I'd tackle my original question. If coding in Java, I would (of course) be using Guava. (And quite certainly not Apache Commons.)

Put this constant somewhere, e.g. in "StringUtils" class:

public static final Ordering<String> CASE_INSENSITIVE_NULL_SAFE_ORDER =
    Ordering.from(String.CASE_INSENSITIVE_ORDER).nullsLast(); // or nullsFirst()

Then, in public class Metadata implements Comparable<Metadata>:

@Override
public int compareTo(Metadata other) {
    int result = CASE_INSENSITIVE_NULL_SAFE_ORDER.compare(this.name, other.name);
    if (result != 0) {
        return result;
    }
    return CASE_INSENSITIVE_NULL_SAFE_ORDER.compare(this.value, other.value);
}    

Of course, this is nearly identical to the Apache Commons version (both use JDK's CASE_INSENSITIVE_ORDER), the use of nullsLast() being the only Guava-specific thing. This version is preferable simply because Guava is preferable, as a dependency, to Commons Collections. (As everyone agrees.)

If you were wondering about Ordering, note that it implements Comparator. It's pretty handy especially for more complex sorting needs, allowing you for example to chain several Orderings using compound(). Read Ordering Explained for more!

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2  
String.CASE_INSENSITIVE_ORDER really does make the solution much cleaner. Nice update. –  Patrick Feb 2 '09 at 19:19
2  
If you use Apache Commons anyway, there's a ComparatorChain so you don't need an own compareTo method. –  amoebe Sep 23 '12 at 19:23

You can extract method:

public int cmp(String txt, String otherTxt)
{
    if ( txt == null )
        return otjerTxt == null ? 0 : 1;

    if ( otherTxt == null )
          return 1;

    return txt.compareToIgnoreCase(otherTxt);
}

public int compareTo(Metadata other) {
   int result = cmp( name, other.name); 
   if ( result != 0 )  return result;
   return cmp( value, other.value);

}

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Should the "0 : 1" not be "0 : -1" ? –  Rolf Kristensen Aug 5 '11 at 10:38

Using Java 8:

private static Comparator<String> nullSafeStringComparator = Comparator
        .nullsFirst(String::compareToIgnoreCase); 

private static Comparator<Metadata> metadataComparator = Comparator
        .comparing(Metadata::getName, nullSafeStringComparator)
        .thenComparing(Metadata::getValue, nullSafeStringComparator);

public int compareTo(Metadata that) {
    return metadataComparator.compare(this, that);
}
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I know that it may be not directly answer to your question, because you said that null values have to be supported.

But I just want to note that supporting nulls in compareTo is not in line with compareTo contract described in official javadocs for Comparable:

Note that null is not an instance of any class, and e.compareTo(null) should throw a NullPointerException even though e.equals(null) returns false.

So I would either throw NullPointerException explicitly or just let it be thrown first time when null argument is being dereferenced.

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You could design your class to be immutable (Effective Java 2nd Ed. has a great section on this, Item 15: Minimize mutability) and make sure upon construction that no nulls are possible (and use the null object pattern if needed). Then you can skip all those checks and safely assume the values are not null.

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Yes, that's generally a good solution, and simplifies many things - but here I was more interested in the case where null values are allowed, for one reason or another, and must be taken into account :) –  Jonik Jan 26 '09 at 23:57

I was looking for something similar and this seemed a bit complicated so I did this. I think it's a little easier to understand. You can use it as a Comparator or as a one liner. For this question you would change to compareToIgnoreCase(). As is, nulls float up. You can flip the 1, -1 if you want them to sink.

StringUtil.NULL_SAFE_COMPARATOR.compare(getName(), o.getName());

.

public class StringUtil {
    public static final Comparator<String> NULL_SAFE_COMPARATOR = new Comparator<String>() {

        @Override
        public int compare(final String s1, final String s2) {
            if (s1 == s2) {
                //Nulls or exact equality
                return 0;
            } else if (s1 == null) {
                //s1 null and s2 not null, so s1 less
                return -1;
            } else if (s2 == null) {
                //s2 null and s1 not null, so s1 greater
                return 1;
            } else {
                return s1.compareTo(s2);
            }
        }
    }; 

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        final ArrayList<String> list = new ArrayList<String>(Arrays.asList(new String[]{"qad", "bad", "sad", null, "had"}));
        Collections.sort(list, NULL_SAFE_COMPARATOR);

        System.out.println(list);
    }
}
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