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I have declared the array labels up at the top of my script

var labels = [];

A function, retrieveLabels is called to append to this array:

     function retrieveLabels() {
      labels = [];
      var getLabelsQuery = "SELECT DISTINCT label FROM items ORDER BY label;"
      db.transaction(function(tx) {
           tx.executeSql(getLabelsQuery, [],
                function(tx, labelsResults) {
                     for (var x = 0; x < labelsResults.rows.length; x++) {
                          var labelsRow = labelsResults.rows.item(x);
                          labels.push(labelsRow['label']);
                     }
                     console.log(labels.length);
                     console.log(labels);
                }
           );
      });
 }

The first console message shows 34 items. The second console message shows ["label1", "label2"....."label34"]

Where I call the function is here:

else {
 init_db();
 retrieveLabels();
 console.log(labels.length);
 console.log(labels);

}

The first console message shows 0 items. The second console message shows ["label1", "label2"....."label34"]

Why would this all of a sudden become a 0 length array? Or was it modified while inside of retrieveLabels?

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2 Answers 2

I would say that tx.executeSql() is asynchronous, and the anonymous functions passed as argument3 is actually executed after retrieveLabels(); has returned.

So at the time your second console.log(labels.length); is called, the query may not have been executed.

Here is a slightly modified version of your function that takes a callback as argument, and calls it once the labels array has been populated:

function retrieveLabels(callback) {
    var labels = [];
    var getLabelsQuery = "SELECT DISTINCT label FROM items ORDER BY label;"
    db.transaction(function(tx) {
        tx.executeSql(getLabelsQuery, [],
            function(tx, labelsResults) {
                for (var x = 0; x < labelsResults.rows.length; x++) {
                    var labelsRow = labelsResults.rows.item(x);
                    labels.push(labelsRow['label']);
                }               

                callback(labels);
            }           
        );      
    }); 
}

Then you can call the function like this:

init_db();
retrieveLabels(function(label) {
    console.log(labels.length);
    console.log(labels);
});
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This worked like a charm. Now, could you explain to me what you did and why that fixed it? I have heard the term callback but don't fully understand it. :) –  gdanko Jan 28 '11 at 15:41
    
callback usually refers to something that you pass to a function's argument so that the function calls it back. Here the callback parameter is just that, the anonymous functions you are passing to db.transaction, tx.executeSql and retrieveLabels are callbacks. –  arnaud576875 Jan 28 '11 at 15:45
    
Now once I have all the labels, I have another DB transaction to make for each label. It will pull lists of items that have "x" as the label name and append the HTML as a list. What's the best way to handle this? Forgive my inquiries, my first foray into JS is in building a Safari extension. :) –  gdanko Jan 28 '11 at 16:43
    
Do a JOIN if that's possible :) –  arnaud576875 Jan 28 '11 at 16:46
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Your calls db.transaction or tx.executeSql might be asynchronous. This means that the array lables hasn't been filled yet when you call console.log(labels.length); console.log(labels); in the else statement.

Your could check by editing you code:

db.transaction(function(tx) {
       tx.executeSql(getLabelsQuery, [],
            function(tx, labelsResults) {
                 for (var x = 0; x < labelsResults.rows.length; x++) {
                      var labelsRow = labelsResults.rows.item(x);
                      labels.push(labelsRow['label']);
                 }
                 console.log("tx.exectureSQL done");
            }
       );
  });

and

else {
    init_db();
    retrieveLabels();
    console.log("else done");
}

this way you can see what actually happens first.

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