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Is there a way to upload an app, but only have it accessible by me? Or perhaps by a specific set of IP's?

Reason being, we want to run a few private online tests before opening the app up to the general public. So far I have come up with the following code:

class ApplicationController < ActionController::Base
  before_filter :restrict_access

  def restrict_access
    whitelist = ['127.0.0.123', '10.0.1.7', '10.0.1.8'].freeze

    unless( whitelist.include? request.env['REMOTE_ADDR'] )
      render :file => "#{Rails.public_path}/500.html", :status => :unauthorized
      return
    end
  end
end

However, the above code still renders the main layout file (app/views/layouts/application.html.erb) which exposes the logo and footer. For un-authorised access we want to display a page that says something like "Ooops, we are still doing a few tests and will be public soon!". No logo of the site, no nothing. Just a simple message.

We are using devise as our authentication gem. We don't want to add authentication functionality just to restrict access for private beta testing. We want to do it by IP instead.

Is such a thing possible? Perhaps the code above just needs working on? Or is there a gem that we can use solely for this requirement?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you're deploying on Apache or Nginx, this should be easy enough to configure in the relevant site config files. Doesn't need to be in the app itself, in that case.

I'm not totally sure what the issue is with your existing code. Are you saying that the filter seems to be ignored, or that the file renders within the layout? If it's the latter, specifying :layout => false as a render option should take care of that.

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My webhost is Heroku. Not too sure if I have access to the server config files. However, :layout => false did it. Thanks for that! –  Christian Fazzini Jan 27 '11 at 17:50
    
Also should I render a 503 Template instead of a 500? –  Christian Fazzini Jan 27 '11 at 18:43
    
@Christian: since this is just a temporary measure, I don't think you need to worry about exactly which error code to use. Since you're sending the 401 error code (:unauthorized), however, it might be fitting to name the file 401.html. –  Matchu Jan 27 '11 at 23:02
    
Actually, it's not meant to show the error code unauthorized. In fact. The error code shouldnt really be there. It's really just a page to tell the user that the site is still under maintenance. i.e. Still undergoing a private beta test. Would a 503 page be more suitable in this case? –  Christian Fazzini Jan 28 '11 at 2:57
class ApplicationController < ActionController::Base
before_filter :check, :except=>:unauth

def unauth
  render(:layout=>false)
end

private
  def check
    whitelist = ['127.0.0.123', '10.0.1.7', '10.0.1.8'].freeze
    if !(whitelist.include? request.env['REMOTE_ADDR'])
      redirect_to('/unauth')
      return
    end
  end
end

untested but should do it, now you can place a plain error msg or whatever in unauth.rhtml

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I will suggest of use some Rack middelware a.e. rack-rewrite

require 'rack-rewrite'

 #in your environment
  config.middleware.insert_before(Rack::Lock, Rack::Rewrite) do
      r301 %r{.*}, "YOUR REDIRECTPAGE$&" ,:if => Proc.new {|rack_env|
              #puts here your conditions basing on rack_env
      }
  end

NOT TESTED

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