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procedure TForm1.Timer2Timer(Sender: TObject);
var  ff : integer;
begin

  for ff := 0 to 32 do
    If CardArray[NewValue] + CardArray[NewValue3] = PlayArray[ff] then
    begin
       sndPlaySound('cashregister.wav', snd_Async or snd_NoDefault);
    end
    else
    begin
       SendClick(451,541);
    end;

end;

Can anyone spot a reason to why this would be working incorrectly? Its triggering SendClick() when it shouldn't be... is there a reason why the if and else is not working ?

 for i := 0 to 32 do
   If CardArray[NewValue] + CardArray[NewValue3] = PlayArray[i] then
     sndPlaySound('cashregister.wav', snd_Async or snd_NoDefault);
   end;

Is in a completely different timer... and plays the sound when it should... so the condition is returning valid when it should be..I'm almost positive it has to be something with the ELSE because i can do this....

  if f1 = 0 then
    SendClick(451,541);
  for ff := 0 to 32 do
    If CardArray[NewValue] + CardArray[NewValue3] = PlayArray[ff] then 
    begin
      sndPlaySound('cashregister.wav', snd_Async or snd_NoDefault);
      f1 := 1;
    end;

and it will stop clicking after the condiition has returned true one time but wont start back up again...

so i know CardArray[NewValue] + CardArray[NewValue3] = PlayArray[ff] is working perfectly fine ...I have not had sleep and I'm sorry if this is confusing to you guys but I don't know why you would need any further code then the first snippet ive posted to tell me whats wrong...

Now if you guys would like the ARRAYS here...

  CardArray[2] := '2';
  CardArray[3] := '3';
  CardArray[4] := '4';
  CardArray[5] := '5';
  CardArray[6] := '6';
  CardArray[7] := '7';
  CardArray[8] := '8';
  CardArray[9] := '9';
  CardArray[10] := '10';
  CardArray[11] := 'J';
  CardArray[12] := 'Q';
  CardArray[13] := 'K';
  CardArray[14] := 'A';
  SuiteArray[99] := 'c';
  SuiteArray[100] := 'd';
  SuiteArray[104] := 'h';
  SuiteArray[115] := 's';
  PlayArray[0] := '22';
  PlayArray[1] := '33';
  PlayArray[2] := '44';
  PlayArray[3] := '55';
  PlayArray[4] := '66';
  PlayArray[5] := '77';
  PlayArray[6] := '88';
  PlayArray[7] := '99';
  PlayArray[8] := '1010';
  PlayArray[9] := 'JJ';
  PlayArray[10] := 'QQ';
  PlayArray[11] := 'KK';
  PlayArray[12] := 'AA';
  PlayArray[13] := 'AK';
  PlayArray[14] := 'AQ';
  PlayArray[15] := 'AJ';
  PlayArray[16] := 'A10';
  PlayArray[17] := 'KA';
  PlayArray[18] := 'QA';
  PlayArray[19] := 'JA';
  PlayArray[20] := '10A';
  PlayArray[21] := 'KQ';
  PlayArray[22] := 'KJ';
  PlayArray[23] := 'K10';
  PlayArray[24] := 'QK';
  PlayArray[25] := 'QJ';
  PlayArray[26] := 'Q10';
  PlayArray[27] := 'JK';
  PlayArray[28] := 'JQ';
  PlayArray[29] := 'J10';
  PlayArray[30] := '10K';
  PlayArray[31] := '10Q';
  PlayArray[32] := '10J';

so for example lets say do this...

NewValue := 2;
NewValue3 := 2;

CardArray[NewValue] + CardArray[NewValue3] would = 22

now lets check the play array for 22

with a for loop

for ff := 0 to 32 do
 if PlayArray[ff] = CardArray[NewValue] +  CardArray[NewValue3] then
begin
dowhatever...
end;

.... is this a valid explanation of whats going on now do you guys understand what the for loop is doing?

share|improve this question
1  
If you keep posting it, we'll keep closing it –  David Heffernan Jan 27 '11 at 18:12
1  
And as for your question, if the condition tests true, then the first branch will be taken, otherwise the second branch will be taken –  David Heffernan Jan 27 '11 at 18:13
1  
What's wrong with it? For starters, it's not a timer issue. Next, you haven't described what's wrong. What values did you expect to be in the arrays and variables? What values are there instead? How did those values get there? –  Rob Kennedy Jan 27 '11 at 18:17
2  
If you edit the original question to include the requisite information, I'll vote to re-open it, I'll encourage others to do the same, and I'll even vote it up. But so far, neither the previous question nor this one has enough information to answer anything. We know your code adds two array values and compares the sum to another array value. We can infer that the sum does not equal the third value since the else branch gets taken. But we cannot tell you why the values aren't equal because we don't know what they are or how they got there. Use your debugger to investigate. –  Rob Kennedy Jan 27 '11 at 18:30
3  
@Bryan Perhaps there's a bug in Delphi. Perhaps the condition is true and Delphi is choosing the wrong branch. Do you think that is likely? No, me neither. So if you want to understand why it's choosing a particular path look at the values of the variables and the answer will become clear. Do you know how to use the debugger? –  David Heffernan Jan 27 '11 at 18:48

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think you want to do something like this:

Play := False;
Cards := CardArray[NewValue] + CardArray[NewValue3];
for ff := 0 to 32 do begin
  if Cards=PlayArray[ff] then begin
    Play := True;
    break;
  end;
end;
if Play then begin
  ContinuePlaying;//I've got great cards
end else begin
  Fold;//I've got a hand full of bus tickets and have to fold
end;

You want to play your cash register sound if any single one of the 33 options matches, otherwise you click the fold button.

I've moved the CardArray[NewValue] + CardArray[NewValue3] code out of the loop because it evaluates the same every time round and that was just confusing the heck out of us all!

Does this to it?

share|improve this answer
    
@david yes..... –  Bryan Jan 27 '11 at 19:22
    
@uhm ill check if that works.. –  Bryan Jan 27 '11 at 19:23
3  
+1 for moving stuff out of the loop AND for your psychic abilities figuring out what @Bryan actually wanted to achieve. –  Marjan Venema Jan 27 '11 at 19:24
    
@Bryan Are you really trying to write a poker bot for online poker play? –  David Heffernan Jan 27 '11 at 19:25
    
Thats exactly what I was trying to make clear - just didn't give the code for it. –  Uwe Raabe Jan 27 '11 at 19:25

The sndPlaySound is taking some time to return.

So you should disable the timer during the loop:

procedure TForm1.Timer2Timer(Sender: TObject);
var
ff : integer;
 begin
   Timer2.Enabled := false;
for ff := 0 to 32 do
If CardArray[NewValue] + CardArray[NewValue3] = PlayArray[ff] then
   begin
   sndPlaySound('cashregister.wav', snd_Async or snd_NoDefault);
   end
else
   begin
   SendClick(451,541);
   end;
   Timer2.Enabled := true;
end;

And... what is strange with your code that you're looping into 33 values, with SendClick or sndPlaySound for each value... I guess your code will never work as such...

Edit: here is a modified version - perhaps it's what you want to have:

procedure TForm1.Timer2Timer(Sender: TObject);
var
ff : integer;
 begin
   Timer2.Enabled := false;
   try
     for ff := 0 to 32 do
     If CardArray[NewValue] + CardArray[NewValue3] = PlayArray[ff] then
     begin
       sndPlaySound('cashregister.wav', snd_Async or snd_NoDefault);
       exit; // value found
     end;
     // not found
     SendClick(451,541);
   finally  
     Timer2.Enabled := true;
   end;
  end;
share|improve this answer
    
Nope, with the SND_ASYNC flag, the function returns immediately. –  Sertac Akyuz Jan 27 '11 at 18:47
    
+1 for disabling the timer. Most timer events should do this. So the answer has merit, despite the problems in the question. –  Chris Thornton Jan 27 '11 at 18:48
    
@Chris I discovered today that if the handler for a timer takes more than the timer interval, nothing happens other than timer events!! I'm sure I knew this once before but have clearly forgotten. –  David Heffernan Jan 27 '11 at 18:59
    
If you call 'Application.ProcessMessages' in the handler though, there'll be re-entry. –  Sertac Akyuz Jan 27 '11 at 19:04
    
@Chris, most timer events don't need to disable the timer because no new timer event can arrive until the thread checks for more messages. Unless playing a sound triggers message-handling, there's no need to disable the timer. –  Rob Kennedy Jan 27 '11 at 19:06

NewValue or NewValue3 does not contain what you think it contains (and no one can guess what that is because there's no indication of where the values come from).

share|improve this answer

You are probably not aware of the fact that the if clause is executed for all values ff from 0 to 32. So you have 33 checks and 33 times either the sound or the click.

My psychic power tells me that you are looking for the sum of the both CardArray values being equal to one value inside PlayArray and then playing a sound or making a click when no match is found. But that is not what you programmed.

share|improve this answer
    
I am aware that it is executed 33 times... NewValue and NewValue3 are constantly being updated... –  Bryan Jan 27 '11 at 18:59
    
They're being updated while the loop is running? How does that work? –  Larry Lustig Jan 27 '11 at 19:02
    
because newvalue's are global variables being updated by a function inside a seperate timer.... the functions read a address in memory and save the values read as newvalue's is this starting to make sense? –  Bryan Jan 27 '11 at 19:16
    
Even if these values are updated from a second timer, there is only one timer event executed at a time. The other timer events are still in the message queue until this timer event is finished. So as your PlayArray values are all different, you will get at most one sound and at least 32 clicks during this timer event. –  Uwe Raabe Jan 27 '11 at 19:24

Simply put, the line:

If CardArray[NewValue] + CardArray[NewValue3] = PlayArray[ff] then

Is not evaluating to true when you expect it to. It is evaluating to false, so the sendclick is executed.

Set a breakpoint on the 'If' in the debugger, look at the values you are adding, are they what you expect?

share|improve this answer

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