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Suppose I have a System.Drawing.Bitmap in 32bpp ARGB mode. It's a large bitmap, but it's mostly fully transparent pixels with a relatively small image somewhere in the middle.

What is a fast algorithm to detect the borders of the "real" image, so I can crop away all the transparent pixels from around it?

Alternatively, is there a function already in .Net that I can use for this?

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2  
Is the cutoff straight? if so, reading pixels from L->R and T->B would work very quick. –  Mitchel Sellers Jan 27 '11 at 18:22
    
If it is square, you can probably save even more time and binary search it from center out on all 4 sides (at least cutting down on pixel interrogations) –  Brad Christie Jan 27 '11 at 18:34
    
Can the small, embedded image also have transparent pixels within it? –  Andrew Garrison Jan 27 '11 at 18:38
    
Unfortunately, the image can be any shape. –  Blorgbeard Jan 27 '11 at 18:38
1  
i don't see a way of doing this better than O(n^2) –  Andrew Garrison Jan 27 '11 at 18:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 17 down vote accepted

The basic idea is to check every pixel of the image to find the top, left, right and bottom bounds of the image. To do this efficiently, don't use the GetPixel method, which is pretty slow. Use LockBits instead.

Here's the implementation I came up with:

static Bitmap TrimBitmap(Bitmap source)
{
    Rectangle srcRect = default(Rectangle);
    BitmapData data = null;
    try
    {
        data = source.LockBits(new Rectangle(0, 0, source.Width, source.Height), ImageLockMode.ReadOnly, PixelFormat.Format32bppArgb);
        byte[] buffer = new byte[data.Height * data.Stride];
        Marshal.Copy(data.Scan0, buffer, 0, buffer.Length);
        int xMin = int.MaxValue;
        int xMax = 0;
        int yMin = int.MaxValue;
        int yMax = 0;
        for (int y = 0; y < data.Height; y++)
        {
            for (int x = 0; x < data.Width; x++)
            {
                byte alpha = buffer[y * data.Stride + 4 * x + 3];
                if (alpha != 0)
                {
                    if (x < xMin) xMin = x;
                    if (x > xMax) xMax = x;
                    if (y < yMin) yMin = y;
                    if (y > yMax) yMax = y;
                }
            }
        }
        if (xMax < xMin || yMax < yMin)
        {
            // Image is empty...
            return null;
        }
        srcRect = Rectangle.FromLTRB(xMin, yMin, xMax, yMax);
    }
    finally
    {
        if (data != null)
            source.UnlockBits(data);
    }

    Bitmap dest = new Bitmap(srcRect.Width, srcRect.Height);
    Rectangle destRect = new Rectangle(0, 0, srcRect.Width, srcRect.Height);
    using (Graphics graphics = Graphics.FromImage(dest))
    {
        graphics.DrawImage(source, destRect, srcRect, GraphicsUnit.Pixel);
    }
    return dest;
}

It can probably be optimized, but I'm not a GDI+ expert, so it's the best I can do without further research...


EDIT: actually, there's a simple way to optimize it, by not scanning some parts of the image :

  1. scan left to right until you find a non-transparent pixel; store (x, y) into (xMin, yMin)
  2. scan top to bottom until you find a non-transparent pixel (only for x >= xMin); store y into yMin
  3. scan right to left until you find a non-transparent pixel (only for y >= yMin); store x into xMax
  4. scan bottom to top until you find a non-transparent pixel (only for xMin <= x <= xMax); store y into yMax

EDIT2: here's an implementation of the approach above:

static Bitmap TrimBitmap(Bitmap source)
{
    Rectangle srcRect = default(Rectangle);
    BitmapData data = null;
    try
    {
        data = source.LockBits(new Rectangle(0, 0, source.Width, source.Height), ImageLockMode.ReadOnly, PixelFormat.Format32bppArgb);
        byte[] buffer = new byte[data.Height * data.Stride];
        Marshal.Copy(data.Scan0, buffer, 0, buffer.Length);

        int xMin = int.MaxValue,
            xMax = int.MinValue,
            yMin = int.MaxValue,
            yMax = int.MinValue;

        bool foundPixel = false;

        // Find xMin
        for (int x = 0; x < data.Width; x++)
        {
            bool stop = false;
            for (int y = 0; y < data.Height; y++)
            {
                byte alpha = buffer[y * data.Stride + 4 * x + 3];
                if (alpha != 0)
                {
                    xMin = x;
                    stop = true;
                    foundPixel = true;
                    break;
                }
            }
            if (stop)
                break;
        }

        // Image is empty...
        if (!foundPixel)
            return null;

        // Find yMin
        for (int y = 0; y < data.Height; y++)
        {
            bool stop = false;
            for (int x = xMin; x < data.Width; x++)
            {
                byte alpha = buffer[y * data.Stride + 4 * x + 3];
                if (alpha != 0)
                {
                    yMin = y;
                    stop = true;
                    break;
                }
            }
            if (stop)
                break;
        }

        // Find xMax
        for (int x = data.Width - 1; x >= xMin; x--)
        {
            bool stop = false;
            for (int y = yMin; y < data.Height; y++)
            {
                byte alpha = buffer[y * data.Stride + 4 * x + 3];
                if (alpha != 0)
                {
                    xMax = x;
                    stop = true;
                    break;
                }
            }
            if (stop)
                break;
        }

        // Find yMax
        for (int y = data.Height - 1; y >= yMin; y--)
        {
            bool stop = false;
            for (int x = xMin; x <= xMax; x++)
            {
                byte alpha = buffer[y * data.Stride + 4 * x + 3];
                if (alpha != 0)
                {
                    yMax = y;
                    stop = true;
                    break;
                }
            }
            if (stop)
                break;
        }

        srcRect = Rectangle.FromLTRB(xMin, yMin, xMax, yMax);
    }
    finally
    {
        if (data != null)
            source.UnlockBits(data);
    }

    Bitmap dest = new Bitmap(srcRect.Width, srcRect.Height);
    Rectangle destRect = new Rectangle(0, 0, srcRect.Width, srcRect.Height);
    using (Graphics graphics = Graphics.FromImage(dest))
    {
        graphics.DrawImage(source, destRect, srcRect, GraphicsUnit.Pixel);
    }
    return dest;
}

There won't be a significant gain if the non-transparent part is small of course, since it will still scan most of the pixels. But if it's big, only the rectangles around the non-transparent part will be scanned.

share|improve this answer
    
Seems like the most practical approach. I don't see it getting any better than this. Nice tip with the LockBits method too. +1 –  Andrew Garrison Jan 27 '11 at 20:43
    
Thanks for this! The lockbits example is useful, I was using GetPixel previously, and it was slooooooow :) –  Blorgbeard Jan 27 '11 at 21:46
2  
BTW, I just realized there is a simpler way to crop the image, without using a Graphics: return source.Clone(srcRect, source.PixelFormat); –  Thomas Levesque Jan 27 '11 at 22:10
2  
Great solution, very helpful, but I found my images were getting clipped by one pixel too many. Logically yours seems right, but I changed the call to Rectangle.FromLTRB to srcRect = Rectangle.FromLTRB(xMin, yMin, xMax + 1, yMax + 1) and now it works perfectly. –  Joel P. Oct 12 '11 at 22:06
    
+1 Brilliant ......................... –  smirkingman May 8 '12 at 20:42

I would like to suggest a divide & conquer approach:

  1. split the image in the middle (e.g. vertically)
  2. check if there are non-transparent pixels on the cut line (if so, remember min/max for bounding box)
  3. split left half again vertically
  4. if cut line contains non-transparent pixels -> update bounding box
  5. if not, you can probably discard the leftmost half (I don't know the pictures)
  6. continue with the left-right half (you stated that the image is somewhere in the middle) until you find the leftmost bound of the image
  7. do the same for the right half
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2  
I think your 5th point is wrong: there could be several distinct areas with non-transparent pixels, so the fact there is no non-transparent pixel on the cut line doesn't mean anything –  Thomas Levesque Jan 27 '11 at 20:27
    
Thanks bjoernz, but yeah: binary search will not always work for my images - it's possible there could be two images separated by whitespace, for example. –  Blorgbeard Jan 27 '11 at 21:49

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