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I'm writing a script in Perl that needs to run at the same time every night, except sometimes that time needs to change. I found Schedule::Cron on CPAN, and it does what I want it to do. According to the documentation for the run method,

nofork => 1

Don't fork when starting the scheduler. Instead, the jobs are executed within current process. In your executed jobs, you have full access to the global variables of your script and hence might influence other jobs running at a different time.

Which is what I want to do, but it is not doing. Whenever I examine the global variables memory location, they are the same, but the value is not changed when the the task starts.

I've run this on both Windows and Linux, and I've had someone else look at the code to see if my logic was correct. What do I need to do to keep the changes to the global variables.

use warnings;
use strict;

use Schedule::Cron;
use Time::localtime;

use constant {
    EVERY_DAY_10PM => '* * * * * 4,16,28,40,52',
    EVERY_DAY_NOON => '* * * * * 0,12,24,36,48',
    EVERY_DAY_2AM => '* * * * * 7,19,31,43,55'
};

############GLOBAL VARIABLES############
our $cron = new Schedule::Cron(\&runUpdate);
our $cronId;
our $updateTimeDirty = 0;
############END GLOBAL VARIABLES############

############MAIN PROGRAM BODY############
$cronId = $cron->add_entry(EVERY_DAY_10PM);#defaults to \&runUpdate
$cron->add_entry(EVERY_DAY_NOON, \&changeTime);
$cron->run(no_fork => 1);
############END MAIN PROGRAM BODY############

sub changeTime {
    our $cron;
    our $cronId;
    our $updateTimeDirty;

    print "updateTimeDirty is $updateTimeDirty\n";
    print "udpateTimeDirty location: " . \$updateTimeDirty . "\n";
    print "cron object: " . \$cron . "\n";

    if ($updateTimeDirty) {
        my $cronEntry = $cron->get_entry($cronId);
        $cronEntry->{time} = EVERY_DAY_2AM;
        $cron->update_entry($cronId, $cronEntry);
    }
    print "\n";
}

sub runUpdate {
    our $updateTimeDirty;

    $updateTimeDirty = 1;
    print "Updating at " . localtime()->sec . " ($updateTimeDirty)\n\n";
}
share|improve this question
up vote 7 down vote accepted

There's a significant difference between no_fork and nofork. Try:

$cron->run(nofork => 1);
share|improve this answer
1  
I had the answer right in my post too, when I cited the documentation. Thanks. That underscore was causing it to fork, so I was just modifying the copies of the variables. – treed Jan 27 '11 at 19:55
1  
good catch! Makes a strong argument for more thorough option checking in the module. – toolic Jan 27 '11 at 19:56

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