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I have an application where I have nodes that have connections to eachother. Each node stores a list of incoming and outgoing connections to the other nodes. From time to time the receiving node needs to be able to get rid of one of its incoming connections. When this happens, I want the connection to be removed from not only the receiving node's list of incoming connections, but also from the sending node's list of outgoing connections. But in order to do this, the receiving node needs the sending node's iterator for the connection. It would be nice if I could just store that iterator as a member of the connection object. But trying to do this will not even compile. When I try to declare an iterator as a class member, the compiler tells me that it is an undefined type. This is what my class declaration looks like:

class Connection
{
   public:
   Connection();
   ~Connection();

   Node* pSourceNode;
   std::list<Connection*>::iterator SourcesIterator;
};

Is there any neat way to make this or something like it work without having to write my own linked list? Perhaps some data structure that has thus far eluded me?

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3  
IMO, this could be dangerous as iterators can be invalidated in some algorithms. –  Max Jan 27 '11 at 20:19
3  
@Max: Wait, a C++ programmer that doesn't trust themselves not to blow things up? Are you sure you're using the right language? –  Fred Nurk Jan 27 '11 at 20:28
    
It's not that I don't trust myself. In fact, I had already written my own intrusive linked-list when a friend scolded me for not using a ready made stl container. So much for trying to write cleaner looking code... –  Ream Jan 27 '11 at 20:38
    
oh come on, you were right with that idea of intrusive container! Don't let people influcence your decision so easily. ;) And if you want it to be a standard solution, boost::intrusive is there for you. –  Kos Jan 27 '11 at 21:26

2 Answers 2

I was able to compile your code just fine. Are you doing a #include <list> in the header?

You may not wish to keep around the iterator anyway; a large number of operations invalidate them. You could keep a pointer to the list in question and get a new iterator when needed.

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Yes, I included the include. Perhaps this is really an issue with my crummy old compiler? I'm using VC6.0 –  Ream Jan 27 '11 at 20:23
2  
VC6 definitely falls short in terms of template support. –  Ben Voigt Jan 27 '11 at 20:26
    
Possibly. I don't have the ability to try compiling with VC6.0... –  James Jan 27 '11 at 20:26
4  
@Ream: Stop using VC6. –  Fred Nurk Jan 27 '11 at 20:29
    
Iterator invalidation shouldn't be a problem here. The only way to invalidate a list iterator is to erase it; even slicing and splicing doesn't invalidate. –  Fred Nurk Jan 27 '11 at 20:43

You might try a typedef/forward declaration combination, might work better in VC6:

typedef class Connection* ConnectionPtr;
class Connection
{
   public:
   Connection();
   ~Connection();

   Node* pSourceNode;
   std::list<ConnectionPtr>::iterator SourcesIterator;
};
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Agreed, except add: class Connection; before even the ConnectionPtr line. I seem to recall that classes aren't defined until the def. has ended. At least I vaguely recall, from some point in time. –  JDonner Jan 27 '11 at 20:34
1  
@JDonner: I don't think even VC6 was that broken. class Connection in the typedef introduces an incomplete class type, which is quite sufficient for creating pointers. –  Ben Voigt Jan 27 '11 at 20:35

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