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I have classes similar the following:

Public Class Form1
    Private d As New Dings("dings")
End Class
Public Class Foo
    Public Sub New(ByVal aName As String)
        MsgBox("new Foo """ & aName & """")
    End Sub
End Class
Public Class Dings
    Public Property Name As String
    Public Property MyFoo As New Foo(Name)
    Public Sub New(ByVal aName As String)
        _Name = aName
    End Sub
End Class

I want the Name property of the Dings class to be initialised at first, but it's the other way around, do you have any ideas how to achieve this? I know, I could also create the foo-object (as member of dings) later in the constructor. But I want to have it this way, because in the end there are very much singleton objects instantiated in the Dings-class that I want to be created in only one line. regards Oops

####### E D I T #############

many thanks to you both. I want to enlarge my question: what about C#, are there any possiblities to initialize the variables in an order defined by myself?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

To answer the C# part of things, the initialization order in C# is:

  • Everything starts with the type's default value (null, 0 etc)
  • Assignments which are part of the field declaration are executed, in textual order (i.e. the order they appear in the source code). Note that for partial classes, this leads to some ambiguity.
  • The base class constructor is executed
  • The constructor body is executed

Note that in C# you couldn't write this anyway:

Public Property Name As String
Public Property MyFoo As New Foo(Name)
  • Automatically implemented properties can't have initial values as part of the declaration
  • You can't use instance members as part of the declaration of an instance variable

To show what I mean by the latter point, this class is invalid in C#:

class Test
{
    string x;
    string y = x;
}

That generates this compile-time error:

Test.cs(6,16): error CS0236: A field initializer cannot reference the non-static field, method, or property 'Test.x'

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Public Property MyFoo As New Foo(Name)

The As New syntax is causing the problem. Delayed initialization does not work here, the compiler generates code in the constructor to initialize the MyFoo property. This injected code always runs before any code you write yourself.

No clean fix, you will have to use a private backing field:

Public Class Dings
    Public Property Name As String
    Private fooBacking As Foo

    Public Property MyFoo As Foo
        Get
            Return fooBacking
        End Get
        Set(ByVal value As Foo)
            fooBacking = value
        End Set
    End Property

    Public Sub New(ByVal aName As String)
        _Name = aName
        MyFoo = New Foo(_Name)
    End Sub
End Class
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You should initialize your MyFoo property directly from the constructor:

Public Class Form1
    Private d As New Dings("dings")
End Class
Public Class Foo
    Public Sub New(ByVal aName As String)
        MsgBox("new Foo """ & aName & """")
    End Sub
End Class
Public Class Dings
    Public Property Name As String
    Public Property MyFoo As Foo

    Public Sub New(ByVal aName As String)
        Name = aName
        MyFoo = New Foo(aName)
    End Sub
End Class

This is bye the way the recommended way (in my opinion) because you keep full control on the sequence properties are initialized. Actually this is a good example.

But it depends of the type of object and if it has relations to other members or conditions:

inline intialization

  • object is a constant
  • object is a value type and does not depend on a special condition(like timestamp)
  • object is a reference type but uses default constructor for initialization

constructor

  • object depends on other members of this class
  • object has a special condition(f.e. Date.Now)
  • class has many members: some are initialized inline and some in constructor makes it less readable, consider to do complete initialization in the constructor
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