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I'm compiling Scala code and write the output console output in file. I only want to save the last line of the STDOUT in a file. Here is the command:

scalac -Xplugin:divbyzero.jar Example.scala >> output.txt

The output of scalac -Xplugin:divbyzero.jar Example.scala is:

helex@mg:~/git-repositories/my_plugin$ scalac -Xplugin:divbyzero.jar Example.scala | tee -a output.txt
You have overwritten the standard meaning
Literal:()
rhs type: Int(1)
Constant Type: Constant(1)
We have a literal constant
List(localhost.Low)
Constant Type: Constant(1)
Literal:1
rhs type: Int(2)
Constant Type: Constant(2)
We have a literal constant
List(localhost.High)
Constant Type: Constant(2)
Literal:2
rhs type: Boolean(true)
Constant Type: Constant(true)
We have a literal constant
List(localhost.High)
Constant Type: Constant(true)
Literal:true
LEVEL: H
LEVEL: H
okay
LEVEL: H
okay
false
symboltable: Map(a -> 219 | Int | object TestIfConditionWithElseAccept2 | normalTermination | L, c -> 221 | Boolean | object TestIfConditionWithElseAccept2 | normalTermination | H, b -> 220 | Int | object TestIfConditionWithElseAccept2 | normalTermination | H)
pc: Set(L, H)

And I only want to save pc: Set(L, H) in the output file and not the rest. With the help of which command I can achieve my goal?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Just pipe stdout through tail -n 1 to your file

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You could use tail:

scalac -Xplugin:divbyzero.jar Example.scala | tail -1 >> output.txt
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scalac ... | awk 'END{print>>"output.txt"}1'

This will pipe everything through to stdout and append the last line to output.txt.

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This solution is clever in that it echoes the output and sends the last line to the output file. If you don't care about seeing the output: scalac ... | awk 'END{print}' >> output.txt –  glenn jackman Jan 28 '11 at 1:00
    
generally, to get last lines, tail is "defacto" tool to use, especially if files/output are huge. In this case, its still ok –  kurumi Jan 28 '11 at 4:01

In Bash and other shells that support process substitution:

command | tee  >(tail -n 1 > outputfile)

will send the complete output to stdout and the last line of the output to the file. You can do it like this to append the last line to the file instead of overwriting it:

command | tee  >(tail -n 1 >> outputfile)
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Just a small precision regarding this tail command. If the program output on standard error, you have to redirect it

Example:

apachectl -t 2>&1 | tail -n 1

Redirections: http://tldp.org/HOWTO/Bash-Prog-Intro-HOWTO-3.html

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