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Take the following tables...

Classes
ClassId ClassName
1       Math
2       Math
3       Science
4       Music

Registrations
RegistrationId ClassId StudentName
1              1       Stu
2              1       Rick
3              2       John
4              4       Barb
5              4       Dan
6              3       Einstein

Yes, there are 2 classes with the same name (Math) as they may be at different times. I would like to get a list of the classes and the number of students registered for each one. I would like the following columns (ClassId, ClassName, StudentCount).

My attempt at this would be something along the lines of...

SELECT Classes.ClassId, Classes.ClassName, Count(Registrations.RegistrationId)
FROM Classes
INNER JOIN Registrations ON Classes.ClassId = Registrations.ClassId
GROUP BY Classes.ClassId

(Note I would like to GroupBy the ClassId but NOT ClassName). Is this possible in SQLServer 2008? Obviously I ask because SQL complains

"ClassName is invalid in the select list because it is not contained in either an aggregate function or the GROUP BY clause."

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
You could select out just the id and aggregated count in a subquery, and then join back to the table for the names. – Pointy Jan 27 '11 at 20:59
up vote 9 down vote accepted

No, SQL Server does not allow you to omit columns from the GROUP BY that are not wrapped in aggregate functions. There's no harm in including the class name, because the group by will be performed on the combination of the group by columns:

  SELECT c.classid, 
         c.classname, 
         COUNT(r.registrationid)
    FROM CLASSES c
    JOIN REGISTRATIONS r ON r.classid = c.classid
GROUP BY c.classid, c.classname

You could derive a table based on the counting, using:

  SELECT c.classid, 
         c.classname, 
         r.num
    FROM CLASSES c
    JOIN (SELECT t.classid,
                 COUNT(*) AS num
            FROM REGISTRATIONS t
        GROUP BY t.classid) r ON r.classid = c.classid
share|improve this answer

There should be no harm in including Classes.ClassName in your GROUP BY statement. You'd be grouping by the distinct pairs of ClassId and ClassName so (1, 'Math') and (2, 'Math') are still two distinct groupings.

share|improve this answer
    
@OMG Ponies and all the others... thank you for helping me realize that the group by will work just fine as long as I keep both (Classes.ClassId and Classes.ClassName). Under a moment of pure stupidity I tried including just Classed.ClassName and not Classes.ClassId and it undesirably grouped all the Math's together. I see my error and thank you all for helping me:) – Justin Jan 27 '11 at 21:10

You can either put the ClassName in the group by clause, which will be ok because it is a 1-to1 with the ClassID:

SELECT Classes.ClassId, Classes.ClassName, Count(Registrations.RegistrationId) FROM Classes INNER JOIN Registrations ON Classes.ClassId = Registrations.ClassId GROUP BY Classes.ClassId, Classes.ClassName

or put a MAX(ClassName) in the select clause. Either one will yield the same result.

share|improve this answer

No, you can't: it's a contradiction.

GROUP BY = collapse to discrete values. If you don't collapse, you need to aggregate it.

As it happens, you'd get the same result anyway because ClassName depends on ClassID.

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