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This is purely out of curiosity, but why does this occur?

>>> a = float('Nan')
>>> a**2.0
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
ValueError: (33, 'Domain error')

I would have expected it to simply return NaN instead of generating an error.

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1  
Python 2.5, 2.6, 2.7 won't raise an ValueError. What version are you using? –  miku Jan 27 '11 at 21:16
1  
Ideone.com disagrees - ideone.com/sRWc9 –  Kos Jan 27 '11 at 21:17
2  
What operating system? What version of Python? Please provide the OS and Python details as an update to your question. –  S.Lott Jan 27 '11 at 22:11
    
I got the same error. Python 2.6.5 on Windows 7 64 bits. But I get nan in my debian lenny with python 2.5 –  razpeitia Jan 28 '11 at 3:18
    
Sorry, should have included more details up front. This is Windows XP with Python 2.6.2. –  TimothyAWiseman Jan 28 '11 at 19:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

From http://www.mail-archive.com/relax-devel@gna.org/msg00337.html, it seems that this is only the case on the windows builds, due to how the compiler implements floating point stuff.

  • Would some of the people who can't reproduce post their OS?
  • Would someone having a 2.x on windows installed try it out (I get the same error on 3.1.3 (on Windows 7 32 bit))?
  • @OP: You are using windows, yes?

Example

Python 2.6.2 (r262:71605, Apr 14 2009, 22:40:02) [MSC v.1500 32 bit (Intel)] on
win32
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> float('NaN')
nan
>>> _**2
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
ValueError: (33, 'Domain error')
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ubuntu 10.4...i dont get any error ;) –  Ant Jan 27 '11 at 21:33
    
see my answer, same compiler, different versions, different behaviour, odd –  eat Jan 27 '11 at 22:11
    
Windows 7 64 bit, 2.7.1 and 3.2rc1 work fine. Weird. –  katrielalex Jan 27 '11 at 22:46
    
Yes, I am using windows with a slight older version of python 2.6.2. I think you nailed it. Thanks. –  TimothyAWiseman Jan 28 '11 at 19:02
    
@Timothy: Not really. Seems that this isn't the answer, as some can't reproduce on windows either =/ The weirdest bugs are the worst, so this one is pretty bad... –  delnan Jan 28 '11 at 19:05

It looks like a bug in whatever implementation of Python you are using. It works as expected for me in all Python versions I tested, ranging from 2.5 to 3.1.

>>> nan = float('NaN')
>>> nan ** 2.0
nan
share|improve this answer
    
That should be **, not *, but it works fine in 2.6.5, too. –  Sebastian Paaske Tørholm Jan 27 '11 at 21:15
    
(1) OP has that problem with **, not with *. (2) I have it too with 3.1.3 –  delnan Jan 27 '11 at 21:17
    
also works like that in python2.6 (two *) –  German Rumm Jan 27 '11 at 21:17
    
Same is true in my Python 2.4.6, 2.6.5, 2.6.6, 2.7.1, and 3.1.3. @TimothyAWiseman, what version are you running, and on what platform? –  ephemient Jan 27 '11 at 21:17
    
Also works fine in 2.4.6, 2.6.4, and 3.1.2. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jan 27 '11 at 21:18

On Vista SP2 Intel DualCore 2.1 GHz

CPython:

In []: sys.version
Out[]: '2.7.1 (r271:86832, Nov 27 2010, 18:30:46) [MSC v.1500 32 bit (Intel)]'
In []: float('NaN')** 2.
Out[]: nan

>>> sys.version
'3.1.3 (r313:86834, Nov 27 2010, 18:30:53) [MSC v.1500 32 bit (Intel)]'
>>> float('NaN')** 2.
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
ValueError: (33, 'Domain error')

Same compiler, but different versions, different results

From different world, IronPython:

>>> sys.version
'2.6.1 ()'
>>> float('NaN')** 2.
nan

>>> sys.version
'2.7.0 (IronPython 2.7 Beta 1 (2.7.0.10) on .NET 4.0.30319.1)'
>>> float('NaN')** 2.
nan
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This is what I get

Python 2.6.5 (r265:79063, Apr 16 2010, 13:57:41) 
[GCC 4.4.3] on linux2

>>> nan=float("NaN")
>>> nan
nan
>>> nan*2
nan
>>> nan**2
nan
>>>
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works the same way with 2.6.6 –  Elalfer Jan 27 '11 at 21:21

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