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I am converting some Java code to Scala, trying to make the code as idiomatic as possible.

So, I now have some code using Options instead of nullable values, and I wonder whether things are scala'ish, or whether I'm wrong. So, could you guys please criticize the following snippet of code ?

The areas in which I am specifically looking for feedback are :

  • The use of a companion object as a factory, giving 2 options depending on whether we want to pass Options or Strings : is the String constructor fine, or should we always expose the fact that it is an Option ?
  • The use of preconditions : are there better ways to assert the fact that alpha3Code and name are mandatory, and a non-null option mustbe passed for alpha2Code ? (I am resorting to Guava for the string utils, as I haven't found anything in the Scala API)
  • The implementation of hashCode, equals and toString. equals and toString delegate to Guava again, whereas equals uses pattern matching. Is there a more scalish way ?
  • I know I could have used Case classes, which would have created default implementations, but I am mostly interested in learning how I should implement those for the cases where case classes cannot be used.

Thanks a lot !

package com.sirika.openplacesearch.api.language

import com.google.common.base.Objects
import com.google.common.base.Strings

object Language {
    def apply(name : String, alpha3Code : String, alpha2Code : Option[String]) = new Language(name, alpha3Code, alpha2Code)
    def apply(name : String, alpha3Code : String, alpha2Code : String = null) = new Language(name, alpha3Code, Option(alpha2Code))
    def unapply(l : Language) = Some(l.name, l.alpha3Code, l.alpha2Code )
}


class Language(val name : String, val alpha3Code : String, val alpha2Code : Option[String]) {
    require(!Strings.isNullOrEmpty(alpha3Code))
    require(!Strings.isNullOrEmpty(name))
    require(alpha2Code != null)

    override def hashCode(): Int = Objects.hashCode(alpha3Code)

            override def equals(other: Any): Boolean = other match {
        case that: Language => this.alpha3Code == that.alpha3Code
        case _ => false
    }

    override def toString() : String = Objects.toStringHelper(this)
        .add("name", name)    
        .add("alpha3", alpha3Code)
        .add("alpha2", alpha2Code)
        .toString()
}
share|improve this question
1  
The "trick" to using Options is to only use Options and force the consumer to do the same ;-) Of course this isn't always practical when dealing with Java (ick!). Welcome to SO. – user166390 Jan 28 '11 at 0:52
    
I don't think require(alpha2Code != null) can ever fail since alpha2Code is an Option – Azzie Sep 25 '14 at 21:07
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think you should expose only Option[String] in factory method. For example I, as a user of your library, will also ask myself question which factory method I should use. And most probably I will use Option.

Scala gives us enough tools to make our lifes easier. For example you can use default for option like this:

def apply(name: String, alpha3Code: String, alpha2Code: Option[String] = None) = 
 new Language(name, alpha3Code, alpha2Code)

If I, again as user of your library, want to pass just string without wrapping it in Some each time, I can write my own implicit conversion like this:

implicit def anyToOption[T](t: T): Option[T] = Some(t)

or even (if I personally use nulls):

implicit def anyToOption[T](t: T): Option[T] = 
 if (t == null) None else Some(t)

But I believe, if you enforce option, it will make your API more solid and clear.

share|improve this answer
3  
Actually, there is an easier way to wrap an object in Option such that a null value will become None: Option(t) (instead of Some(t)) – Madoc Jan 27 '11 at 23:45

You should avoid null unless there's a very good reason not to. As it is, you could have just written this:

def apply(name : String, alpha3Code : String, alpha2Code : String) = new Language(name, alpha3Code, Option(alpha2Code))
def apply(name : String, alpha3Code : String) = new Language(name, alpha3Code, None)

The preconditions are fine. You could write it like this:

require(Option(alpha3Code) exists (_.nonEmpty))
require(Option(name) exists (_.nonEmpty))

Not necessarily an improvement, though.

A String has hashCode, so I don't understand why you are calling another method to generate a hash code instead of just calling alpha3Code.hashCode. I do think there's something in the Scala API, though. Not sure.

The equals code should have a canEqual method, unless you make your class sealed or final. Pattern match is pretty much the way to do it, though you could have written it like this given the presence of an extractor:

case Language(_, `alpha3Code`, _) => true

But the way you wrote it is pretty much the way it is usually written.

share|improve this answer
    
The other answers seem to emphasize the fact that I should actually force the consumer to use the Option constructor. Do you agree with that statement ? – Sami Dalouche Jan 28 '11 at 14:05
    
Regarding hashCode, it's true that in this case, I could directly use alpha3Code.hashCode, I didn't even think about it as I have the habit of always using guava syntax, which allows adding several keys : Objects.hashCode(alpha3Code, name) – Sami Dalouche Jan 28 '11 at 14:10
    
And good point concerning the canEqual method. I was not aware of it. For others who do not know about the canEqual, you can refer to books.google.com/… – Sami Dalouche Jan 28 '11 at 14:13
    
Also: are the `` between alpha3Code intentional ? Do they mean "the value should match this.alpha3Code" ? I cannot find more information about that, so I would greatly appreciate a link. – Sami Dalouche Jan 28 '11 at 14:28
    
In pattern matching, backticks mean to the compiler: "Pretend this value is capitalized". – Mitch Blevins Jan 28 '11 at 15:10

I dislike Options -- they add a level of indirection that's unnecessary and confusing in many cases. I dislike nulls even more, so I understand that often the use of Options is justified. However, you should always see if there is a more natural way to eliminate the the use of Option in an interface.

Default parameters or separate overloads are often a better option. So I'd rewrite your code like this:

package com.sirika.openplacesearch.api.language

import com.google.common.base.Strings
import com.google.common.base.Objects

object Language {
    def apply(name : String, alpha3Code : String, alpha2Code : String) = new Language(name, alpha3Code, alpha2Code)
    def apply(name : String, alpha3Code : String ) = new Language(name, alpha3Code)
    def unapply(l : Language) = Some(l.name, l.alpha3Code, l.alpha2Code )
}


class Language private (val name : String, val alpha3Code : String, val alpha2Code : Option[String]) {
    def this(name:String,alpha3Code: String ,alpha2Code:String) = this(name,alpha3Code,Option(alpha2Code))
    def this(name:String,alpha3Code: String) = this(name,alpha3Code,None)

    require(!Strings.isNullOrEmpty(alpha3Code))
    require(!Strings.isNullOrEmpty(name))

    override def hashCode  = alpha3Code.hashCode

    override def equals(other: Any) = other match {
        case that: Language => this.alpha3Code == that.alpha3Code
        case _ => false
    }

    override def toString = Objects.toStringHelper(this)
        .add("name", name)    
        .add("alpha3", alpha3Code)
        .add("alpha2", alpha2Code)
        .toString()
}
share|improve this answer

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