Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm creating an entry form that I want to only be accessible when three url params are in place: example.com/entries/new/2011/01/27 If someone tries to access any other url (i.e. example.com/entries/new or example.com/entries/new/2011/) I want Rails to set an :alert and bounce the user back to the index page.

Currently, I only have this code in my routes.rb match '/entries/new/:year/:month/:day' => 'entries#new'. What do I need to do to control the redirection if the proper params aren't in the URL? Would I check for each param in the controller and then perform a redirect_to, or is this something I can do from the routes.rb file exclusively? If it's the former, is there an easier way to check that all three params exist other than:

if params[:year].nil && params[:month].nil && params[:day].nil redirect_to ...

share|improve this question
1  
You are probably not getting many answers because this is not the normal way of doing things. Typically, the URL would be example.com/entries/create?date=2011-01-27 or example.com/entries/create?year=2011&month=1&day=27 and you would not deal with all the routing stuff. You could then use validations for checking the parameters. – Kyle Heironimus Jan 28 '11 at 0:24
up vote 1 down vote accepted

This route requires the presence of all three parameters:

match '/entries/new/:year/:month/:day' => 'entries#new'

With only that route, GET /entries/new will result in:

No route matches "/entries/new"

You can redirect from within routes.rb like this:

  match '/entries' => 'entries#index'
  match '/entries/new/:year/:month/:day' => 'entries#new'
  match "/entries/new/(*other)" => redirect('/entries')

The second line matches paths where all three parameters are present. The third line matches all other cases of /entries/new using "route globbing", and does the redirect. Requests matched by the third line will not hit EntriesController#new.

Note: you may not need the first line if you've already defined a route to EntriesController#index -- but watch out for resources :entries, which will redefine index and new.

More info can be found in the guide Rails Routing From the Outside In. When using date parameters, constraints are a good idea (Section 4.2)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.