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I have two Form classes, one of which has a ListBox. I need a setter for the SelectedIndex property of the ListBox, which I want to call from the second Form.

At the moment I am doing the following:

Form 1

public int MyListBoxSelectedIndex
{
     set { lsbMyList.SelectedIndex = value; }
}

Form 2

private ControlForm mainForm; // form 1

public AddNewObjForm()
{
     InitializeComponent();
     mainForm = new ControlForm();           
}

public void SomeMethod()
{
     mainForm.MyListBoxSelectedIndex = -1;
}

Is this the best way to do this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I usually use the Singleton Design Pattern for something like this http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singleton_pattern . I'll make the main form that the application is running under the singleton, and then create accessors to forms and controls I want to touch in other areas. The other forms can then either get a pointer to the control they want to modify, or the data in the main part of the application they wish to change.

Another approach is to setup events on the different forms for communicating, and use the main form as a hub of sorts to pass the event messages from one form to another within the application.

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Why wouldn't you just use events? This is what they are for, communication between objects without tight coupling. –  Ed S. Jan 28 '11 at 0:33
    
@Ed Swangren - That's why I suggested them as well. It's totally an option, though it requires a whole lot more time to do each individual event as you want to add new hooks, while a singleton is pretty much a one time thing. My personal favorite thing to do is to abstract the UI out from the core behavior of the application. That core then is the singleton, and can have events attached to it. Then all UI is just a view of the data within the core. This makes doing undo/redo behaviors much much easier. –  ColinCren Jan 28 '11 at 1:56
    
I don't see any requirement for undo-redo behavior, and I disagree with your statement that implies that seting up events is an onerous task. Singletons are often a crappy solution to any problem. I was going to list some supporting arguments, bit I found a pretty good list here: blogs.msdn.com/b/scottdensmore/archive/2004/05/25/140827.aspx –  Ed S. Jan 28 '11 at 8:26

Making them Singleton is not a completely bad idea, but personally I would not prefer to do it that way. I'd rather pass the reference of one to another form. Here's an example.

Form1 triggers Form2 to open. Form2 has overloaded constructor which takes calling form as argument and provides its reference to Form2 members. This solves the communication problem. For example I've exposed Label Property as public in Form1 which is modified in Form2.

With this approach you can do communication in different ways.

Download Link for Sample Project

//Your Form1

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        Form2 frm = new Form2(this);
        frm.Show();
    }

    public string LabelText
    {
        get { return Lbl.Text; }
        set { Lbl.Text = value; }
    }
}

//Your Form2

public partial class Form2 : Form
{
    public Form2()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private Form1 mainForm = null;
    public Form2(Form callingForm)
    {
        mainForm = callingForm as Form1; 
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void Form2_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {

    }

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        this.mainForm.LabelText = txtMessage.Text;
    }
}

alt text

alt text

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1  
-1, events are a much better solution. –  Ed S. Jan 28 '11 at 0:33
    
This is by far the best way to go. –  Bradley Uffner Oct 24 '11 at 4:28
3  
@EdS. : Are you really downrating a solution because you don't think it's the best solution? I hope not because this is a totally valid and working solution. –  Tipx Oct 24 '11 at 4:46
    
While, yes, the solution is valid, I don't believe it is optimal: I do not recommend passing a Form to anything other than a presenter. If you are not using presenters, then use another class in which to pass delegates or pass delegates to the other form. Do not open one form up to abuse by another. –  IAbstract May 10 '12 at 15:06

protected by Community Nov 28 '12 at 19:42

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