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IntelliSense says that the lambda parameter ea is a DownloadStringCompletedEvent Args. Understood, but parameter s is only defined as "object s". Can anyone explain the purpose of this parameter?

WebClient client = new WebClient();

        client.DownloadStringCompleted += (s, ea) => 
                     { XDocument document = XDocument.Parse(ea.Result);
                        // ... Do something else...
                      };
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

EventHandlers in .NET are typically of the form

void MyEventHandler(object sender, EventArgs e) { ... }

The sender argument is the object that the event occurred on. Since it can be just about anything, object is used. The EventArgs argument is typically either System.EventArgs itself, or a subclass of it. In your case it is a subclass.

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AFAIK that object s is usually known as the "Sender", hence the s for sender - ie. the object that generate the event, aka, the source.

Hope this helps.

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I'm waaay too slow in getting answers typed up. Good work, and I believe this is right. Here's the REAL documentation on the the event that's raised, not the handler, and WHY s is the sender: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  AndyG Jan 28 '11 at 1:08
    
lol thank you very much –  evandrix Jan 28 '11 at 1:11
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The lambda matches the delegate

public delegate void DownloadStringCompletedEventHandler( Object sender, DownloadStringCompletedEventArgs e )

Where s is "The source of the event."

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.net.downloadstringcompletedeventhandler.aspx

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