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Assume that there is a class like the following.

public Class SomeClass {
    private A getA() {
        ...
    }

    public void show() {
        A a = getA();    // CASE #1
        ...
    }

    public void show2() {
        A a = this.getA();    // CASE #2
        ...
    }

Their result are same, isn't? My idiot co-worker insisted that's right!!(it means they're different.)

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yes, they're the same. –  Rekin Jan 28 '11 at 1:37
4  
I don't get this. He's an idiot for agreeing with you? He may be an idiot for other reasons but not for this reason. –  EJP Jan 28 '11 at 1:47
    
They're the same. I have no idea why people add this in front of method invocations. –  Steve Kuo Jan 28 '11 at 3:48
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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

They're the same in this context. I'd advocate not using this since it's implied and it's just cluttering up the code by being there, but it makes no practical difference whether it's there or not.

It's not useless though. The this keyword is required sometimes, for instance:

  • When a local variable / parameter hides a field it's used to differentiate between them
  • When referring to the outer instance of a class from the inner instance (use Outer.this)
  • When using explicit generic types to call a method rather than just infered types (you can't just do <String, String>stringMethod(), it has to be this.<String, String>stringMethod().

That's by no means an exhaustive list, just serves as an example to demonstrate while it doesn't make a difference in this case, it can do in other cases!

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Your co-worker isn't that much of an idiot after all, because they are the same. In the first case, Java implicitly implies this.

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I will cite the best example of this pointer I came across in my school days.

class ThisChk
{
    int param1;
    public int check(int param1)
    {
        this.param1 = param1; //this.param1 is the class variable param1, param1 is the function parameter with a local scope
        return 0;
    }
}
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Here's a case where you may want to use 'this' just to be clear.

class Outer {
     A a;

     public A getA() {
         return a;
     }

     class InnerSuper {
          A a;

          public A getA() {
              return a;
          }
     }

     class Inner extends InnerSuper {
         public void test() {
             A a = Outer.this.getA();
             A a = this.getA();
         }
     }
}
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