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Let's say I need to communicate with a class that provides a protocol and calls delegate methods when an operation is complete, as so:

@protocol SomeObjectDelegate

@required
- (void)stuffDone:(id)anObject;
- (void)stuffFailed;

@end

@interface SomeObject : NSObject
{
}
@end

Now, I've decided that while I could make another class implement the stuffDone: delegate method, I've decided that I'd rather encapsulate the process into a block which is written somewhere close to where SomeObject is instantiated, called, etc. How might I do this? Or in other words, if you look at this famous article on blocks (in the Replace Callbacks section); how might I write a method in SomeObject that accepts a completionHandler: of sorts?

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3 Answers

up vote 37 down vote accepted

It sounds like you wish to communicate with an existing class which is designed to take a delegate object. There are a number of approaches, including:

  1. using a category to add block-based variants of the appropriate methods;
  2. use a derived class to add the block-based variants; and
  3. write a class which implements the protocol and calls your blocks.

Here is one way to do (3). First let's assume your SomeObject is:

@protocol SomeObjectDelegate
@required
- (void)stuffDone:(id)anObject;
- (void)stuffFailed;

@end

@interface SomeObject : NSObject
{
}

+ (void) testCallback:(id<SomeObjectDelegate>)delegate;

@end

@implementation SomeObject

+ (void) testCallback:(id<SomeObjectDelegate>)delegate
{
    [delegate stuffDone:[NSNumber numberWithInt:42]];
    [delegate stuffFailed];
}

@end

so we have some way to test - you will have a real SomeObject.

Now define a class which implements the protocol and calls your supplied blocks:

#import "SomeObject.h"

typedef void (^StuffDoneBlock)(id anObject);
typedef void (^StuffFailedBlock)();

@interface SomeObjectBlockDelegate : NSObject<SomeObjectDelegate>
{
    StuffDoneBlock stuffDoneCallback;
    StuffFailedBlock stuffFailedCallback;
}

- (id) initWithOnDone:(StuffDoneBlock)done andOnFail:(StuffFailedBlock)fail;
- (void)dealloc;

+ (SomeObjectBlockDelegate *) someObjectBlockDelegateWithOnDone:(StuffDoneBlock)done andOnFail:(StuffFailedBlock)fail;

// protocol
- (void)stuffDone:(id)anObject;
- (void)stuffFailed;

@end

This class saves the blocks you pass in and calls them in response to the protocol callbacks. The implementation is straightforward:

@implementation SomeObjectBlockDelegate

- (id) initWithOnDone:(StuffDoneBlock)done andOnFail:(StuffFailedBlock)fail
{
    if (self = [super init])
    {
        // copy blocks onto heap
        stuffDoneCallback = Block_copy(done);
        stuffFailedCallback = Block_copy(fail);
    }
    return self;
}

- (void)dealloc
{
    Block_release(stuffDoneCallback);
    Block_release(stuffFailedCallback);
    [super dealloc];
}

+ (SomeObjectBlockDelegate *) someObjectBlockDelegateWithOnDone:(StuffDoneBlock)done andOnFail:(StuffFailedBlock)fail
{
    return (SomeObjectBlockDelegate *)[[[SomeObjectBlockDelegate alloc] initWithOnDone:done andOnFail:fail] autorelease];
}

// protocol
- (void)stuffDone:(id)anObject
{
    stuffDoneCallback(anObject);
}

- (void)stuffFailed
{
    stuffFailedCallback();
}

@end

The only thing you need to remember is to Block_copy() the blocks when initializing and to Block_release() them later - this is because blocks are stack allocated and your object may outlive its creating stack frame; Block_copy() creates a copy in the heap.

Now you can all a delegate-based method passing it blocks:

[SomeObject testCallback:[SomeObjectBlockDelegate
                                  someObjectBlockDelegateWithOnDone:^(id anObject) { NSLog(@"Done: %@", anObject); }
                                  andOnFail:^{ NSLog(@"Failed"); }
                                  ]
]; 

You can use this technique to wrap blocks for any protocol.

ARC Addendum

In response to the comment: to make this ARC compatible just remove the calls to Block_copy() leaving direct assignments:

stuffDoneCallback = done;
stuffFailedCallback = fail;

and remove the dealloc method. You can also change Blockcopy to copy, i.e. stuffDoneCallback = [done copy];, and this is what you might assume is needed from reading the ARC documentation. However it is not as the assignment is to a strong variable which causes ARC to retain the assigned value - and retaining a stack block copies it to the heap. Therefore the ARC code generated produces the same results with or without the copy.

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can your explain this part with ARC? stuffDoneCallback = Block_copy(done); stuffFailedCallback = Block_copy(fail); It tells me, that it needs a bridge cast. –  zeiteisen Oct 11 '11 at 7:04
    
@zeiteisen - Good question. You probably know the answer by now, apologies I never saw the comment. But for future visitors I've added an addendum. –  CRD Feb 13 '12 at 0:53
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You could do something like this:

typedef void (^AZCallback)(NSError *);

AZCallback callback = ^(NSError *error) {
  if (error == nil) {
    NSLog(@"succeeded!");
  } else {
    NSLog(@"failed: %@", error);
  }
};

SomeObject *o = [[SomeObject alloc] init];
[o setCallback:callback]; // you *MUST* -copy the block
[o doStuff];
...etc;

Then inside SomeObject, you could do:

if ([self hadError]) {
  callback([self error]);
} else {
  callback(nil);
}
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The below link explains how the call backs using delegates could be easily replaced with blocks.

The examples includes UITableview,UIAlertview and ModalViewController.

click me

Hope this helps.

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Have a look at stackoverflow.com/help/how-to-answer. Specifically, this answer could be improved by following this guideline: "Always quote the most relevant part of an important link, in case the target site is unreachable or goes permanently offline." –  Ben Collins Jan 15 at 17:02
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