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Hi i am trying to understand how to use the 'this' pointer. Now i wrote a sample program which uses a class Image which is a subclass of a class BMP. Now the functions TellWidth and TellHeight are declared in the BMP class. Now the compiler gives me an error which says that the TellWidth function does not exist in Image. But as Image is a subclass of BMP shouldnt it inherit the functions in BMP. How do i resolve this

void Image :: invertcolors()
{
    int x;
    int y;

    int width  =(*this).TellWidth();
    int height = (*this)->TellHeight();

    for(x=0,x<=height-1;x++){
        for(y=0,y<=width-1;y++){
            (*this)(x,y)->Red = (255 - (*this)(x,y)->Red);
            (*this)(x,y)->Blue = (255 - (*this)(x,y)->Blue);
            (*this)(x,y)->Green = (255 - (*this)(x,y)->Green);

        }
    }
    delete width;
    delete height;
}

Image

class Image : public BMP  
{
public:

    void invertcolors();

    void flipleft();
    void adjustbrightness(int r, int g, int b) ;

};

This class is too big to post here, here is a relavent excerpt

class BMP {
private:
   int Width;
   int Height;
public:
   int TellBitDepth(void) const;
   int TellWidth(void) const;
   int TellHeight(void) const;
};
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3  
Don't use delete here. –  Loki Astari Jan 28 '11 at 2:44
    
Please post the parts of the header file(s) that declare the classes Image and BMP. Include the class declarations themselves, and the declaration(s) for invertcolors, TellWidth, and TellHeight. Also include any kind of data declaration(s) for representing the bitmap data (e.g., arrays), and/or field declarations named x and y if they happen to exist (see my answer below.) You can probably delete everything else in the header files, at least for now. –  Dan Breslau Jan 28 '11 at 3:23
    
Please also include the definitions of any fields or methods named Red, Green, or Blue. –  Dan Breslau Jan 28 '11 at 3:31
    
It compiles fine for me if I remove the irrelevant Red/Green/Blue part and fix the obvious error with (*this)->. Maybe you've got the problem with linking, not compiling? Perhaps these functions either aren't defined or their units aren't included in the linking process? –  Sergey Tachenov Jan 28 '11 at 7:25
    
Also, it is very unlikely, but maybe you're using some weird compiler that doesn't like the (void) formal argument list for those functions? It is perfectly valid, but rarely used in C++, usually it's just (). –  Sergey Tachenov Jan 28 '11 at 7:31

3 Answers 3

TellWidth() is most likely declared as private (or has no accessor modifier) in the BMP class. It needs to be protected or public for the Image class to be able to access it, and it needs to be also virtual, if you want to be able to override it in the Image class.

And the proper this usage is like this:

int width = this->TellWidth();
int height = this->TellHeight();

Read this for a quick tutorial on this.

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TellWidth() is public. And when u use the usage you have mentioned the compiler tells me that class Image has no member names TellWidth. –  Rahul Ahuja Jan 28 '11 at 2:36

One point about this: you rarely need to mention it explicitly. The usual exception is when you need to pass it into a non-member function (which doesn't seem to be the case here.)

When you're inside of a class member function, this->field can be accessed simply as field, and this->function(x) can be invoked as function(x).

Here are some comments on your code. I hope they're helpful.

void Image :: invertcolors()
{
    // Don't define these here; that's old C-style code. Declare them where
    // they're needed (in the loop: for (int x=0...)
    int x;
    int y;

    // Change the lines below to
    // int width  = TellWidth();
    // int height = TellHeight();
    //    (*this).TellWidth() should work, but is redundant;
    //    (*this)->TellHeight() should probably *not* work, as once you've
    //    dereferenced *this, you're dealing with an object instance, not a
    //    pointer. (There are ways to make (*this)->that() do something useful,
    //    but you're probably not trying something like that.)
    int width  =(*this).TellWidth();
    int height = (*this)->TellHeight();

    for(x=0,x<=height-1;x++){
        for(y=0,y<=width-1;y++){
            // After locating the BMP class through google (see Edit 2),
            // I've confirmed that (*this)(x,y) is invoking a (int,int) operator
            // on the BMP class. It wasn't obvious that this operator 
            // was defined; it would have been helpful if you'd posted
            // that part of the header file.
            (*this)(x,y)->Red = (255 - (*this)(x,y)->Red);
            (*this)(x,y)->Blue = (255 - (*this)(x,y)->Blue);
            (*this)(x,y)->Green = (255 - (*this)(x,y)->Green);

        }
    }
    // These are int values. They can't be deleted, nor do they need to be.
    // I'm sure the compiler has told you the same thing, though perhaps not
    // in the same way.
    delete width;
    delete height;
}

EDIT: Looks like there's someone else taking the same course as the OP. The example presented there makes it clearer that Image is supposed to have some sort of array accessor, which may explain what (*this)(x,y)->Red = (255 - (*this)(x,y)->Red) was intended to achieve.

EDIT 2: Here's the source for the original BMP class.

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class Image is defined as

class Image : public BMP  
{
public:

    void invertcolors();

    void flipleft();
    void adjustbrightness(int r, int g, int b) ;

};
share|improve this answer
1  
What is class BMP defined as? –  Franci Penov Jan 28 '11 at 2:46
    
class BMP{ private int Width; int Height; public: int TellBitDepth(void) const; int TellWidth(void) const; int TellHeight(void) const; }; This is part of the class the other i wrote earlier is too big to post –  Rahul Ahuja Jan 28 '11 at 2:47
2  
Please post the code as edits to your question, not as answers or comments. –  Dan Breslau Jan 28 '11 at 3:20

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