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I have a very odd problem with javascript. If you take the following code and run it, it will run fine without any error, but if you comment the first alert, it will throw an error at line 5 (var _board = Bomber.BoardFactory.getBoard();) saying BoardFactory doesn't exist (remember that with the first alert everything was running without error). I have been able to reproduce this exact behavior with Firefox and Chrome.

Bomber = {};

Bomber.Game = function () {
    var self = {};
    var _board = Bomber.BoardFactory.getBoard();

    self.init = function () {};
    self.start = function () {};

    return self;
}

alert("2");

(function () {
    var instance;

    Bomber.BoardFactory = {};
    Bomber.BoardFactory.getBoard = function () {
        if (!instance)
            instance = new Bomber.Board();
        return instance;
    };
})();

alert("3");

Bomber.Board = function () {
    var self = {};
    return self;
}

$(document).ready(function () {
    var game = Bomber.Game();
    game.init();
    game.start();
});

My question, is what can possibly cause this odd behavior ? How on earth is it possible that an alert call makes it recognize the Bomber.BoardFactory ?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I ran it through jslint, fixed the errors (2 missing semicolons and missing {} on your if)

Now it seems to work

Bomber = {};

Bomber.Game = function () {
    var self = {};
    var _board = Bomber.BoardFactory.getBoard();

    self.init = function () {};
    self.start = function () {};

    return self;
};

//alert("2");

(function () {
    var instance;

    Bomber.BoardFactory = {};
    Bomber.BoardFactory.getBoard = function () {
        if (!instance){
            instance = new Bomber.Board();
        }
        return instance;
    };
})();

//alert("3");

Bomber.Board = function () {
    var self = {};
    return self;
};

$(document).ready(function () {
    var game = Bomber.Game();
    game.init();
    game.start();
});

What's happening is you're missing the final semicolon after you define Bomber.Game, so the next thing is (function()....etc, so it thinks you're calling the function.

If you have the alert there you are saved by automatic semicolon insertion.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh, I see it now, that was a tricky one. –  HoLyVieR Jan 28 '11 at 3:23
1  
@HoLyVieR only the first time it's seen :-) I don't use semi-colons except where required -- however, for expressions that start with a (, (or very rarely [ but also + or -) I always precede them with a ; such as: ;(function () {...})(). JavaScript does utilize ASI but it won't put in a semi-colon if the previous expression can be continued. Since ...}\nalert(... wasn't a valid expression JavaScript read it as ...};alert(.... Happy coding. –  user166390 Jan 28 '11 at 3:39
    
@pst the semicolon is being inserted between the closing } of the function, and the line beginning alert (from what I understand of it) –  david Jan 28 '11 at 3:40
    
@david Yeah, I read that wrong -- removed comment :) Good answer. –  user166390 Jan 28 '11 at 3:41
    
@pst it's always safer to put the semicolon in, rather than trying to game the system. If you're worried about size, run it through an optimiser/compiler, it will remove the semicolons you don't need. –  david Jan 28 '11 at 3:43

it is hard to predict which one will execute first: (function () { or the $(document).ready(function () { try to combine those and declare all your functions before anything else

share|improve this answer
    
No it's not, the immediately executing function will execute first, always. –  david Jan 28 '11 at 3:25
    
not in this case, Bomber.BoardFactory was undefined when the call to Bomber.Game() happened –  Kris Ivanov Jan 28 '11 at 3:26
    
That's because the call to Bomber.Game() wasn't happening in the $(document).ready handler, it was happening immediately because the OP left off a semicolon. –  david Jan 28 '11 at 3:27
    
right, I remember now the confusion was between $(document).ready(function () { and function pageLoad() { not to be mistaken with self executing function, sry about that, my mistake –  Kris Ivanov Jan 28 '11 at 3:42

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