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I've written the following code:

public class ClassAndObjectLock {
 public static void main(String[] args) {
  new Thread(new EvenThread()).start();
  new Thread(new OddThread()).start();
 }
}

class EvenThread implements Runnable {
 public void run() {
  for (int i = 0; i < 10; i += 2) {
   CommonClass.printEvenNumber(i);
  }
 }
}

class OddThread implements Runnable {
 public void run() {
  for (int i = 1; i < 10; i += 2) {
   CommonClass.printOddNumber(i);
  }
 }
}

class CommonClass {
 public static void printEvenNumber(int num) {
  synchronized (CommonClass.class) {
   System.out.println("Even :" + num);
  }
 }

 public static void printOddNumber(int num) {
  synchronized (CommonClass.class) {
   System.out.println("Odd :" + num);
  }
 }
}

When I execute the above code, following is the output:

Even :0
Odd :1
Even :2
Odd :3
Even :4
Odd :5
Even :6
Odd :7
Even :8
Odd :9

I do not understand this output. As per my understanding, when new Thread(new EvenThread()).start(); is executed, it spawns a thread of class EvenThread which should acquire the lock of CommonClass and keep the lock with itself until it has printed all the even values. The object of OddThread should get a chance only after the object of EvenThread has finished. Therefore in my opinion the output should be the following:

Even :0  
Even :2
Even :4
Even :6
Even :8
Odd :1
Odd :3
Odd :5
Odd :7
Odd :9

Could anyone please explain me the underlying logic?

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As per my understanding, when new Thread(new EvenThread()).start(); is executed, it spawns a thread of class EvenThread which should acquire the lock of CommonClass and keep the lock with itself until it has printed all the even values.

No, that is not the case:

 public static void printOddNumber(int num) {
   synchronized (CommonClass.class) {
       System.out.println("Odd :" + num);
   }
 }

which (since the method is static on the monitor class), can also be written as

 public static synchronized void printOddNumber(int num) {
       System.out.println("Odd :" + num);
 }

Look at the scope of the synchronized block: It prints just one number and then releases the lock.

If you want to print all numbers without being interrupted, you have to lock for the duration of your whole for loop:

public void run() {
  synchronized(CommonClass.class){
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i += 2) {
     System.out.println("Even :" + num);
    }
  }
}
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Thanks a lot Thilo for the precise explanation :) –  n_g Jan 28 '11 at 5:17
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Your synchronization is at the level of print methods, which means that every print acquires and releases the lock. If you want the thread to hold the lock for the duration, you have to synchronize on that object in the thread's run method instead (around the loop).

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