Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've got a piece of code similar to this:

import sys

def func1():
    func2()

def func2():
    raise Exception('test error')

def main():
    err = None

    try:
        func1()
    except:
        err = sys.exc_info()[1]
        pass

    # some extra processing, involving checking err details (if err is not None)

    # need to re-raise err so caller can do its own handling
    if err:
        raise err

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()

When func2 raises an exception I receive the following traceback:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "err_test.py", line 25, in <module>
    main()
  File "err_test.py", line 22, in main
    raise err
Exception: test error

From here I don't see where the exception is coming from. The original traceback is lost.

How can I preserve original traceback and re-raise it? I want to see something similar to this:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "err_test.py", line 26, in <module>
    main()
  File "err_test.py", line 13, in main
    func1()
  File "err_test.py", line 4, in func1
    func2()
  File "err_test.py", line 7, in func2
    raise Exception('test error')
Exception: test error
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 40 down vote accepted

A blank raise raises the last exception.

# need to re-raise err so caller can do its own handling
if err:
    raise

If you use raise something Python has no way of knowing if something was a exception just caught before, or a new exception with a new stack trace. That's why there is the blank raise that preserves the stack trace.

share|improve this answer

It is possible to modify and rethrow an exception:

If no expressions are present, raise re-raises the last exception that was active in the current scope. If no exception is active in the current scope, a TypeError exception is raised indicating that this is an error (if running under IDLE, a Queue.Empty exception is raised instead).

Otherwise, raise evaluates the expressions to get three objects, using None as the value of omitted expressions. The first two objects are used to determine the type and value of the exception.

If a third object is present and not None, it must be a traceback object (see section The standard type hierarchy), and it is substituted instead of the current location as the place where the exception occurred. If the third object is present and not a traceback object or None, a TypeError exception is raised.

The three-expression form of raise is useful to re-raise an exception transparently in an except clause, but raise with no expressions should be preferred if the exception to be re-raised was the most recently active exception in the current scope.

So if you want to modify the exception and rethrow it, you can do this:

try:
    buggy_code_which_throws_exception()
except Exception as e:
    raise Exception, "The code is buggy: %s" % e, sys.exc_info()[2]
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting. The accepted answer handles the OP's use case better than this, but this is interesting as a more general answer. I can't see much use for it though since the traceback gets really misleading if you catch, say, a ValueError and raise a RuntimeError (you can't see, then, that a ValueError was ever involved), and the only cases I've come across personally when I've wanted to preserve the traceback but do something more complex than just raise with no arguments were cases where I wanted to raise an exception of a different type. –  Mark Amery Mar 27 '13 at 15:27
3  
I've used this to rethrow the same exception with a different message, including more details about the conditions that caused the exception, which are available in the outer scope but not the inner. –  qris Apr 2 '13 at 10:20
1  
There are sometimes very good reasons for using this three expression form of raise. Your answer just helped me write a decorator that wraps integration tests and on failure takes a screenshot. And then raises the original assertion failure. The trouble being that the traceback was getting clobbered by try/excepts in the screen shot taking code. So thanks! –  aychedee Mar 17 at 17:10

You can get a lot of information about the exception via the sys.exc_info() along with the traceback module

try the following extension to your code.

import sys
import traceback

def func1():
    func2()

def func2():
    raise Exception('test error')

def main():

    try:
        func1()
    except:
        exc_type, exc_value, exc_traceback = sys.exc_info()
        # Do your verification using exc_value and exc_traceback

        print "*** print_exception:"
        traceback.print_exception(exc_type, exc_value, exc_traceback,
                                  limit=3, file=sys.stdout)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()

This would print, similar to what you wanted.

*** print_exception:
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "err_test.py", line 14, in main
    func1()
  File "err_test.py", line 5, in func1
    func2()
  File "err_test.py", line 8, in func2
    raise Exception('test error')
Exception: test error
share|improve this answer
    
No, I don't want to print it in the main(). I want to re-raise it with the original traceback and let caller of main() to handle it (e.g. ignore, print to the console, save into the db, etc). Jochen's solution worked. –  parxier Jan 28 '11 at 6:08

Your main function needs to look like this:

def main():
    try:
        func1()
    except Exception, err:
        # error processing
        raise

This is the standard way of handling (and re-raising) errors. Here is a codepad demonstration.

share|improve this answer
    
I have a feeling that except Exception, err: can be bypassed with old-style raise "bad exception" way of raising exceptions –  parxier Jan 28 '11 at 6:05
    
@parxier then use except object, err –  Gabi Purcaru Jan 28 '11 at 7:42
    
It's not any different from err = sys.exc_info()[1]. Anyway, the main point was to re-raise err outside of except block without loosing original traceback. Jochen's solution worked. –  parxier Jan 29 '11 at 2:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.