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How do find the id of the button which is being clicked?

<button id="1" onClick="reply_click()"></button>
<button id="2" onClick="reply_click()"></button>
<button id="3" onClick="reply_click()"></button>

function reply_click()
{
}
share|improve this question
    
ID's cannot be only numeric. It should consist of letters or letters and numbers. –  Robin van Baalen Feb 13 '13 at 15:54
8  
@Robin van Baalen: ID's should not be numeric per convention, but they can be. –  williambq Jun 25 '13 at 18:26

10 Answers 10

up vote 142 down vote accepted

You need to send the ID as the function parameters. Do it like this:

<button id="1" onClick="reply_click(this.id)">B1</button>
<button id="2" onClick="reply_click(this.id)">B2</button>
<button id="3" onClick="reply_click(this.id)">B3</button>

<script type="text/javascript">
function reply_click(clicked_id)
{
    alert(clicked_id);
}
</script>

This will send the ID this.id as clicked_id which you can use in your function. See it in action here.

share|improve this answer
    
I just wanted to note, for anyone getting a null reference exception using JQuery's event.target.id (for me, both Firefox and IE were throwing it), this is a great solution that works in all three major browsers. –  X3074861X Aug 8 '13 at 16:30

In general, things are easier to keep organized if you separate your code and your markup. Define all of your elements, and then in your JavaScript section, define the various actions that should be performed on those elements.

When an event handler is called, it's called within the context of the element that was clicked on. So, the identifier this will refer to the DOM element that you clicked on. You can then access attributes of the element through that identifier.

For example:

<button id="1">Button 1</button>
<button id="2">Button 2</button>
<button id="3">Button 3</button>

<script type="text/javascript">
var reply_click = function()
{
    alert("Button clicked, id "+this.id+", text"+this.innerHTML);
}
document.getElementById('1').onclick = reply_click;
document.getElementById('2').onclick = reply_click;
document.getElementById('3').onclick = reply_click;
</script>

share|improve this answer
    
what if the buttons are in a repeater and therefore generated dynamically, so you dont know how many buttons you will have? –  Amc_rtty Oct 26 '12 at 12:47
    
There are a number of ways you could handle that. For example, generate the javascript dynamically. Or, add the same class to all of the buttons, and then iterate through all buttons with that class name and attach the handler that way. –  Jason LeBrun Oct 26 '12 at 17:33

(I think the id attribute needs to start with a letter. Could be wrong.)

You could go for event delegation...

<div onClick="reply_click()">
    <button id="1"></button>
    <button id="2"></button>
    <button id="3"></button>
</div>

function reply_click(e) {
    e = e || window.event;
    e = e.target || e.srcElement;
    if (e.nodeName === 'BUTTON') {
        alert(e.id);
    }
}

...but that requires you to be relatively comfortable with the wacky event model.

share|improve this answer
    
This won't work. You've specified code in the onclick attribute that calls reply_click with no arguments. So, no event argument will be passed to the function. –  Jason LeBrun Jan 28 '11 at 6:03
1  
And the value of the "id" attribute can be any string. It doesn't have to start with a letter. –  Jason LeBrun Jan 28 '11 at 6:03
    
@Jason Actually, in all the good modern browsers, the e argument is generated automatically. If it isn't, then we must be dealing with IE6-8, which instead provides that useful object via window.event. –  sdleihssirhc Jan 28 '11 at 6:06
    
@Jason Also, ids can't start with a number. –  sdleihssirhc Jan 28 '11 at 6:07
3  
@sdleihssirhc Actually, you arrogant so-and-so, that all changes with HTML5. –  sdleihssirhc Jan 28 '11 at 6:08
<button id="1" onClick="reply_click(this)"></button>
<button id="2" onClick="reply_click(this)"></button>
<button id="3" onClick="reply_click(this)"></button>

function reply_click(obj)
{
var id = obj.id;
}
share|improve this answer
7  
Welcome to SO. Please explain code when you answer. –  Tim Nov 8 '12 at 6:52
<button id="1"class="clickMe"></button>
<button id="2" class="clickMe"></button>
<button id="3" class="clickMe"></button>

$('.clickMe').click(function(){
    var clickedID = this.id;
});
share|improve this answer
 <button id="1"class="clickMe"></button>

<button id="2" class="clickMe"></button>

<button id="3" class="clickMe"></button>



$('.clickMe').live('click',function(){

var clickedID = this.id;

});
share|improve this answer

Button 1 Button 2 Button 3

var reply_click = function() { 
     alert("Button clicked, id "+this.id+", text"+this.innerHTML); 
} 
document.getElementById('1').onclick = reply_click; 
document.getElementById('2').onclick = reply_click; 
document.getElementById('3').onclick = reply_click;
share|improve this answer

How to do it without inline JavaScript

it is generally recommended to avoid inline JavaScript, but rarely is there an example of how to do it.
Here is my way of attaching events to buttons.
I'm not entirely happy with how much longer the recommended method is compared to a simple onClick attribute.

Modern browsers only

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<script>
(function(doc){
    var hasClass = function(el,className) {
        return (' ' + el.className + ' ').indexOf(' ' + className + ' ') > -1;
    }
    doc.addEventListener('click', function(e){
      if(hasClass(e.target, 'click-me')){
          e.preventDefault();
          doSomething.call(e.target, e);
      }
    });
})(document);

function insertHTML(str){
  var s = document.getElementsByTagName('script'), lastScript = s[s.length-1];
  lastScript.insertAdjacentHTML("beforebegin", str);
}

function doSomething(event){
  console.log(this.id); // this will be the clicked element
}
</script>
<!--... other head stuff ...-->
</head>
<body>

<!--Best if you inject the button element with javascript if you plan to support users with javascript disabled-->
<script>
insertHTML('<button class="click-me" id="btn1">Button 1</button>');
</script>

<!--Use this when you don't care about broken buttons when javascript is disabled.-->
<!--buttons can be used outside of forms http://stackoverflow.com/a/14461672/175071 -->
<button class="click-me" id="btn2">Button 2</button>
<input class="click-me" type="button" value="Button 3" id="btn3">

<!--Use this when you want to lead the user somewhere when javascript is disabled-->
<a class="click-me" href="/path/to/non-js/action" id="btn4">Button 4</a>

</body>
</html>

Cross-browser

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<script type="text/javascript">
(function(doc){
    var cb_addEventListener = function(obj, evt, fnc) {
        // W3C model
        if (obj.addEventListener) {
            obj.addEventListener(evt, fnc, false);
            return true;
        } 
        // Microsoft model
        else if (obj.attachEvent) {
            return obj.attachEvent('on' + evt, fnc);
        }
        // Browser don't support W3C or MSFT model, go on with traditional
        else {
            evt = 'on'+evt;
            if(typeof obj[evt] === 'function'){
                // Object already has a function on traditional
                // Let's wrap it with our own function inside another function
                fnc = (function(f1,f2){
                    return function(){
                        f1.apply(this,arguments);
                        f2.apply(this,arguments);
                    }
                })(obj[evt], fnc);
            }
            obj[evt] = fnc;
            return true;
        }
        return false;
    };
    var hasClass = function(el,className) {
        return (' ' + el.className + ' ').indexOf(' ' + className + ' ') > -1;
    }

    cb_addEventListener(doc, 'click', function(e){
      if(hasClass(e.target, 'click-me')){
          e.preventDefault ? e.preventDefault() : e.returnValue = false;
          doSomething.call(e.target, e);
      }
    });
})(document);

function insertHTML(str){
  var s = document.getElementsByTagName('script'), lastScript = s[s.length-1];
  lastScript.insertAdjacentHTML("beforebegin", str);
}

function doSomething(event){
  console.log(this.id); // this will be the clicked element
}
</script>
<!--... other head stuff ...-->
</head>
<body>

<!--Best if you inject the button element with javascript if you plan to support users with javascript disabled-->
<script type="text/javascript">
insertHTML('<button class="click-me" id="btn1">Button 1</button>');
</script>

<!--Use this when you don't care about broken buttons when javascript is disabled.-->
<!--buttons can be used outside of forms http://stackoverflow.com/a/14461672/175071 -->
<button class="click-me" id="btn2">Button 2</button>
<input class="click-me" type="button" value="Button 3" id="btn3">

<!--Use this when you want to lead the user somewhere when javascript is disabled-->
<a class="click-me" href="/path/to/non-js/action" id="btn4">Button 4</a>

</body>
</html>

Cross-browser with jQuery

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<script type="text/javascript">
(function($){
    $(document).on('click', '.click-me', function(e){
      doSomething.call(this, e);
    });
})(jQuery);

function insertHTML(str){
  var s = document.getElementsByTagName('script'), lastScript = s[s.length-1];
  lastScript.insertAdjacentHTML("beforebegin", str);
}

function doSomething(event){
  console.log(this.id); // this will be the clicked element
}
</script>
<!--... other head stuff ...-->
</head>
<body>

<!--Best if you inject the button element with javascript if you plan to support users with javascript disabled-->
<script type="text/javascript">
insertHTML('<button class="click-me" id="btn1">Button 1</button>');
</script>

<!--Use this when you don't care about broken buttons when javascript is disabled.-->
<!--buttons can be used outside of forms http://stackoverflow.com/a/14461672/175071 -->
<button class="click-me" id="btn2">Button 2</button>
<input class="click-me" type="button" value="Button 3" id="btn3">

<!--Use this when you want to lead the user somewhere when javascript is disabled-->
<a class="click-me" href="/path/to/non-js/action" id="btn4">Button 4</a>

</body>
</html>

You can run this before the document is ready, clicking the buttons will work because we attach the event to the document.

Here is a jsfiddle
For some strange reason the insertHTML function does not work in it even though it works in all my browsers.

You can always replace insertHTML with document.write if you don't mind it's drawbacks

<script>
document.write('<button class="click-me" id="btn1">Button 1</button>');
</script>

Sources:

share|improve this answer

With pure javascript:

 var buttons = document.getElementsByTagName("button");
 var buttonsCount = buttons.length;
for (var i = 0; i <= buttonsCount; i += 1) {
    buttons[i].onclick = function(e) {
        alert(this.id);
    };
}​

check it On JsFiddle

share|improve this answer

You can simply do it this way:

<input type="button" id="1234" onclick="showId(this.id") value="click me to show my id"/>
<script type="text/javascript">
   function showId(obj) {
        var id=obj;
        alert(id);
   }

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