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This is a part of a static assert trick. I can't understand how the unspecialized class works. Can someone explain it to me?

EDIT: Full code with macro: (taken from http://www.skynet.ie/~caolan/Fragments/C++StaticAssert.html)

#ifndef STATICASSERT_HXX
#define STATICASSERT_HXX
/*
 Lifted direct from:
 Modern C++ Design: Generic Programming and Design Patterns Applied
 Section 2.1
 by Andrei Alexandrescu
*/
namespace ww
{
    template<bool> class compile_time_check
    {
    public:
        compile_time_check(...) {}
    };

    template<> class compile_time_check<false>
    {
    };
}

    /*
    Similiar to assert, StaticAssert is only in operation when NDEBUG is not
    defined. It will test its first argument at compile time and on failure
    report the error message of the second argument, which must be a valid c++
    classname. i.e. no spaces, punctuation or reserved keywords.
    */
#ifndef NDEBUG
#   define StaticAssert(test, errormsg)                         \
    do {                                                        \
        struct ERROR_##errormsg {};                             \
        typedef ww::compile_time_check< (test) != 0 > tmplimpl; \
        tmplimpl aTemp = tmplimpl(ERROR_##errormsg());          \
        sizeof(aTemp);                                          \
    } while (0)
#else
#   define StaticAssert(test, errormsg)                         \
    do {} while (0)
#endif

#endif
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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The macro calls this code in a way similar to this:

compile_time_check<static expression> temp(Error_Some_Struct_here);

So, for example, you could do this:

compile_time_check<sizeof(Foo) < sizeof(Bar)> temp(Error_Foo_must_be_smaller_than_Bar);

When sizeof(Foo) is less than sizeof(Bar), the template would instanciate the unspecialized version:

template<bool> class compile_time_check
{
public:
    compile_time_check(...) {}  //What is this?
};

and the code basically "compiles to" an instanciation of this class:

compile_time_check temp(Error_Foo_must_be_smaller_than_Bar);

which, being empty and doing nothing, the compiler can remove as dead code. Bam, no runtime overhead, done.

If, on the other hand, sizeof(Foo) is greater than or equal to sizeof(Bar), it would instead instanciate the specialized version:

template<> class compile_time_check<false>
{
};

and it would attempt to call the constructor compile_time_check::compile_time_check(struct), but since it doesn't exist, its a compile error. Which is what you want, because static assert should only compile if the assert is true.

The reason for the constructor to take a variadic parameter list is, I believe, two-fold:

  1. To make sure that it does not call the default constructor, which the specialized version would have. Its variadic so that you can pass in any struct as an error "string". Alternatively, this could have been templated and the constructor could have taken a template object as an argument instead.
  2. So that the error message can be passed in. When the assert is true, this is ignored and nothing happens and the code is removed by the compilers optimizer. If the assert is false, however, the error string should show up in the error message. Something like constructor not found for compile_time_check::compile_time_check(ERROR_Assertion_error_blah()) perhaps.

An alternative, template-free (I believe its often used in C), static assert I've seen somewhere before is this:

#define compile_time_assert(pred) switch(0){case: 0: case pred:;}

This works because if pred is false, the code would end up as switch(0){case: 0: case 0:;} and two case labels with the same constant is an error. In depth explanation here.

share|improve this answer
    
@Dan: See my edit. Why does the macro have a sizeof(aTemp); line? –  nakiya Jan 28 '11 at 6:11
    
@Dan Actually compile_time_check::compile_time_check() would compile because the default constructor is available. That's why a struct with a looong name is being passed. –  ssmir Jan 28 '11 at 6:16
    
ssmir, sure. Thanks for pointing that out. I wrote that before I saw the full code. In the code now posted, it wouldn't compile without the struct thats passed in. I will edit the answer. –  Dan Jan 28 '11 at 6:19
    
I have no idea why the sizeof(aTemp) is there. I don't see any reason why it would be needed or wanted, nor can I find an explanation on the website or the mailing list discussion linked from the website. –  Dan Jan 28 '11 at 6:36
    
Another static assert that can be used in both C and C++ and requires no runtime cost at all would be #define STATIC_ASSERT( cond, msg ) typedef char ASSERT_#msg[ (cond)? 1 : -1 ]; If the condition is true, the size of the array is positive and it compiles, while if the condition is false, the size is -1 and the typedef is incorrect (there cannot be an array of negative size). I have seen it sometimes with (cond)-1, but I think that is less readable. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 28 '11 at 8:51

Getting rid of the namespace for the moment (since it's basically irrelevant), what you have is:

template<bool> class compile_time_check
{
public:
    compile_time_check(...) {}  //What is this?
};

This much is a class template. It has a non-type template parameter of type bool, and a variadic constructor, so it'll accept any argument.

template<> class compile_time_check<false>
{
};

This is a specialization of the previous template for the value false. As such, when you instantiate compile_time_check<false> checker;, it'll use this one. This specialization has a default constructor (that's never used) but no constructor that will accept a parameter.

The intent is that this is only ever used from here:

    typedef ww::compile_time_check< (test) != 0 > tmplimpl; \
    tmplimpl aTemp = tmplimpl(ERROR_##errormsg());          \
    sizeof(aTemp);                                          \

In this case, we instantiate a tmplimpl object with a ctor parameter. If the template parameter was true, that'll work, but if the template parameter was false, it'll use the specialization above that only has a default ctor, not one that'll take an argument -- so the compiler will print out an error message saying something like:

error: no ctor found for compile_time_check<condition>("<error message>");

The subsequent sizeof(aTemp); is there to force that object to be evaluated at compile time, so we see this as a compiler error message instead of a linker error saying that compile_time_check::compile_time_check<false>() is an unresolved external.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for explaining sizeof(aTemp) –  Dan Jan 28 '11 at 6:47

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