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In context of a web application, Is it suitable to do some JOIN operation in Java, on the data retrieved from the database(from first query), and use that "JOIN"ed data for the second and final query to the database to get the required data.

Does Java provide any built in mechanism for such implementations or what could be the best possible way to do this ?

(I know, this is not the best thing to do, but the database is not a SQL database & does not allow for JOIN operations.)

The data for the JOIN operation is: - One dataset contains about 50 integers(avg) and other contains about 150 integers(avg).

The 1st dataset would have list of only integers but the second will have a list of sets of integer & a 'data-integer'. If the two integers in the two datasets intersect then the corresponding 'data-integer' is passed in the results list. So the result would contain the data integers corresponding to the intersected integers.

For e.g. List A ={ 21, 65, 93} List B ={ (21, 42342), (53,73242), (93, 32312)}

Result ={ 42342, 32312 }

Both of the two sets data for the JOIN operation may be implemented in the form of a tree structure. Hence this JOIN operation could be made more efficient because only trees will need to be compared not the entire list (While performing JOIN, if the two (similar depth) nodes do not match at some node in the tree, then all its child nodes will be skipped, and the control will move to the next top node)

Thanks.

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3 Answers

For sure, you can do a fast JOIN in Java. I know only about three reasons against doing it:

  • it's additional work
  • the non-matching rows get fetched needlessly
  • the amount of data may be too large to be handled in memory

Without an SQL DB you have no choice, anyway. So, assuming the simplest case, i.e., joining on a condition like A.x = B.x, you can do it easily by computing the intersection using Set.retainAll. For each member of the intersection you need to combine all corresponding rows from the first table with all corresponding rows from the second one.

Assuming there are no more interesting columns in the tables, you're done. Otherwise you need to attach them somehow. In case x is unique in both A and B you can use Maps, otherwise you need a Multiset (there are many implementations available, e.g., in Guava).

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Thanks so much Maaartinus! Should we go with the standard JOIN implementation or we should design our own customized implementation since our dataset is more in tree structure(hence there is a possiblity to make more efficient algorithm). –  user01 Jan 28 '11 at 15:49
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I don't understand exactly, how the tree structure could be used, but I'd keep it simple. You can write a simple JOIN like described in a couple of minutes. You can test it and see if it's fast enough. For the sizes you mention (50 and 150), it can't be a problem. It could get slow in case the result is large (it could have in theory up to 50*150 elements), but then there's nothing what you could do about it. In your case where the first list contains no additional data, you create just a subset of the second list, right? Then it's easy. –  maaartinus Jan 28 '11 at 16:27
    
Thank you maaartinus! –  user01 Jan 28 '11 at 16:54
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Joining data in Java is not a bad idea at all. In some situations it it may be faster and more sensible than doing joins in the database (it depends on many factors). Especially if you have no other choice :-)

If you can get the results from the database as standard jdbc resultsets, then you can use the family of intelligent rowsets: JoinRowSet, FilteredRowSet etc. They gather tabular data from the database and them join and filter, and serialize them on the Java side (bit like ado.net). Standard implementations are not part of the standard, but you will find them in com.sun.rowset package.

If you only need to make this single join, they might be an overkill, but since you are using some nosql db, you might want to standardize the way you filter and join.

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Thanks Fdreger! We have the datasets for JOIN operation in the form of trees, so we could even go with our customized solution(to make more efficient with tree comparision) instead of the standard JOIN implementation which is usually meant for simple two lists of data. Secondly, dont you think it could be a performance kill in context of a high traffic web application ? We are using the results to get the data for the homepage of a web application. Ofcourse the best way is to verify though testing but it's difficult to simulate the exact conditions thus I am looking for experts' views on this. –  user01 Jan 28 '11 at 15:46
    
As you said, it is impossible to verify without a test. But my gut feeling is that raw processing speed should not be a problem in a your application (not that my guts know anything about your app). Probably the whole join will take much less time than processing html templates. There is no reason why Java should be slower than a database at making a hash join. –  fdreger Jan 31 '11 at 10:08
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Are you asking how to do a set intersection in Java? Given your definition of the data--two datasets, entirely integers--here is my suggestion:

Set a = new HashSet(the list of elements from the first dataset) Set b = new HashSet(the list of elements fro the second dataset)

Set joined = a.retainAll(b); // this is how to do set intersections with java.util.Set

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Yes it is like intersections only. But.. The 1st dataset would have list of only integers but the second will have a list of sets of integer & a 'data-integer'. If the two integers in the two datasets intersect then the corresponding 'data-integer' is passed in the results list. So the result would contain the data integers corresponding to the intersected integers. For e.g. List A ={ 21, 65, 93} List B ={ (21, 42342), (53,73242), (93, 32312)} Result ={ 42342, 32312 } –  user01 Jan 28 '11 at 7:00
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