Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

0x0.3p10 represents what value?

And what's the meaning of the p in the statement above?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 28 down vote accepted

0x0.3p10 is an example of a hexadecimal floating point literal, introduced in C99. The p separates the base number from the exponent.

The 0x0.3 bit is called the significand part (whole with optional fraction) and the exponent is the power of two by which it is scaled.

That particular value is calculated as 0.3 in hex, or 3 * 16-1 (3/16) multiplied by 210 (1024), which gives 3 * 1024 / 16 or 192.

The following program confirms this:

#include <stdio.h>
int main (void) {
    double d = 0x0.3p10;
    printf ("%.f\n", d);
    return 0;
}

Section 6.4.4.2 of C99 has all the details:

A floating constant has a significand part that may be followed by an exponent part and a suffix that specifies its type. The components of the significand part may include a digit sequence representing the whole-number part, followed by a period (.), followed by a digit sequence representing the fraction part.

The components of the exponent part are an e, E, p, or P followed by an exponent consisting of an optionally signed digit sequence. Either the whole-number part or the fraction part has to be present; for decimal floating constants, either the period or the exponent part has to be present.

The significand part is interpreted as a (decimal or hexadecimal) rational number; the digit sequence in the exponent part is interpreted as a decimal integer. For decimal floating constants, the exponent indicates the power of 10 by which the significand part is to be scaled. For hexadecimal floating constants, the exponent indicates the power of 2 by which the significand part is to be scaled.

For decimal floating constants, and also for hexadecimal floating constants when FLT_RADIX is not a power of 2, the result is either the nearest representable value, or the larger or smaller representable value immediately adjacent to the nearest representable value, chosen in an implementation-defined manner. For hexadecimal floating constants when FLT_RADIX is a power of 2, the result is correctly rounded.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, Then what decimal value it stand for? Does the p stand for some english word? Thank you. –  Nano HE Jan 28 '11 at 7:31
2  
p for power perhaps? –  tobyodavies Jan 28 '11 at 7:36
1  
Thank you for this answer. Is this usable in C++? –  Benoit May 24 '11 at 11:44
1  
@Benoit, I don't think so - C++0x 2.14.4 details the floating literals and there's no mention of the p variant in there. –  paxdiablo May 24 '11 at 12:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.