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public sealed class Singleton
{
    static readonly Singleton instance=new Singleton();

    // Explicit static constructor to tell C# compiler
    // not to mark type as beforefieldinit
    static Singleton()
    {
    }

    Singleton()
    {
    }

    public static Singleton Instance
    {
        get
        {
            return instance;
        }
    }
}

I think even on removing readonly keyword from the instance member instantiation, the singleton would still work equally well.

  • Its static, only one instance would exist.
  • The value cant change, as it has no setter.
  • Its a sealed class, cant be subclassed.

Please help me correct my understanding of the concepts here.

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OMG!!! downvote.. ?? Someone care to explain why ?? –  Danish Khan Jan 28 '11 at 8:24
    
I don't think this question is bad, why downvote? –  Danny Chen Jan 28 '11 at 8:26
    
Someone came through here and downvoted the question as well as every response. I wouldn't worry about it. –  Ed S. Jan 28 '11 at 8:27
    
@Ed yeah, just figured it out.. –  Danish Khan Jan 28 '11 at 8:31
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4 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Because if the field were not marked readonly it could be modified within the Singleton class. Of course, it still could not be modified by the outside world, but a singleton really isn't a singleton if there is more than one instance of it during the lifetime of your program, and the readonly specifier enforces the semantics that you want in a singleton class.

EDIT in response to:

  1. Its static, only one instance would exist.
  2. The value cant change, as it has no setter.

Static variables can certainly be set to reference different objects at runtime. The value can change, if only within the class due to it being private. If the class were implemented such that the field was only ever assigned to once, it wouldn't be a problem in practice. However, since the assumed intention is that the singleton instance will never change, the readonly modifier guarantees those semantics outside of the constructor. It's not essential because clients of the class cannot change the reference, but it is preferred because it a) makes the intent of the code clear, and b) prevents the reference from being changed even within the class.

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I'd be curious to know why I got a downvote for this. Care to explain where you think I got it wrong? –  Ed S. Jan 28 '11 at 8:22
    
Actually, it seems like someone went through this topic and downvoted everyone (even the question). Curious... –  Ed S. Jan 28 '11 at 8:23
    
Yes, it happened to me too... –  digEmAll Jan 28 '11 at 8:26
    
I gave you an upvote to even it out. Some idiot troll just ran through this topic, oh well. –  Ed S. Jan 28 '11 at 8:27
    
+1 and I believe CLR has optimization on read-only variables, to make something faster/easier. –  Danny Chen Jan 28 '11 at 8:27
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Using readonly is not essential in this case but it is something that enforces the semantics of the code by indicating the nature of the field. Personally I always use the readonly keyword for all field declarations whose value is going to be initialized only once. It also might help the compiler perform some optimizations under certain circumstances.

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Don't you ever use lazy load? That would be kind of hard with readonly modifier :) –  Sergey Berezovskiy Jan 28 '11 at 9:21
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I don't think readonly must present here - it makes sense only for lazy initialization. If you static field marked as readonly - it could be initialized only during declaration or in static constructor. If instance is not marked as readonly - you can initalize it during first call to Instance property.

BTW I think it's better to use singleton with double-check locking:

public sealed class Singleton
{
    private Singleton()
    {
       // Initialize here
    }

    private static volatile Singleton _singletonInstance;

    private static readonly Object syncRoot = new Object();

    public static Singleton Instance
    {
       get
       {
          if(_singletonInstance == null)
          {
             lock(syncRoot))
             {
                if(_singletonInstance == null)
                {   
                   _singletonInstance = new Singleton();
                }
             }
          }

          return _singletonInstance;
       }           
    }
}
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I removed the readonly in a class because I wanted to make a OneAtaTimeleton (instead of a Singleton).

Why? Well, the class contained some configuration that I wanted the user (administrator) to be able to change while the app was running. So, I added a static Reload() method to the class, which has:

instance = new Configuration();

hence the need to remove the readonly.

The private version of the constructor loads the config (via a non-static method).

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