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Here is a schema of my code :

while (..)
{
   for (...; ...;...)
        for(...;...;...)
            if ( )
            {
                 ...
                 continue;
            }
} 

What will do the continue? He will only make the second loop iterate one time, no? I would like it to reach the while, is it possible ?

Thanks!

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1  
you should avoid inner loops at all, they make code unreadable and highly error-prone. –  onof Jan 28 '11 at 9:33
    
@onof I disagree, at least partially. There are times when "inner loops" are really the best way to solve the problem (sometimes another control abstraction or method call is better). However, I am of the belief that loop constructs should always use a {} as it helps indenting and avoids issues of confusing content-not-in-a-loop as being in the loop. –  user166390 Jan 28 '11 at 9:47
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6 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The continue here impacts the nearest loop - your second for. There are two ways of jumping directly to the while:

  • goto, although sometimes "considered harmful", this is arguably the main reason why it still exists
  • return

To illustrate the latter:

while (..)
{
    DoSomething(..);
}

void DoSomething(..) {
    for (...; ...;...)
      for(...;...;...)
          if ( )
          {
             ...
             return;
          }
}

and the former:

while (..)
{
   for (...; ...;...)
        for(...;...;...)
            if ( )
            {
                 ...
                 goto continueWhile;
            }
   continueWhile:
       { } // needs to be something after a label
}
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I think this is what I needed ;) Thanks a lot! –  Flo Jan 28 '11 at 10:10
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while (..)
{
   for (...; ...;...)
        for(...;...;...)
            if ( )
            {
                 ...
                 goto superpoint;
            }
superpoint:
//dosomething
} 
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goto shouldn't be used as far as i remember. –  Pabuc Jan 28 '11 at 9:25
    
this is pretty much the reason goto exists, if it wasnt meant to be used why is it in the language? –  djeeg Jan 28 '11 at 9:26
    
@Pabuc it shouldn't be used lightly - but here it does the job fine. Much simpler than checking a flag at every level. See also the MSDN example on breaking out of nested loops –  Marc Gravell Jan 28 '11 at 9:27
    
I'm not talking about the way you use it. Goto should never be used. Don't know where I've read it but author had a pretty good reason. Searching for it atm and will post if I can find it –  Pabuc Jan 28 '11 at 9:28
    
Ok I can't find it but, I would still make this a method and return when found instead of goto. Maybe that is just me but I never use goto - never. –  Pabuc Jan 28 '11 at 9:34
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You should set a variable to determine when you need to leave the loops.

while (..)

{

bool goToWhile = false; 

for (...; ... && !goToWhile;...)

    for(...;... && !goToWhile;...)
        if ( )
        {
             ...
             goToWhile = true; 
        }

}

Come up with better names though ;)

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Not possible directly as continue; only continues the execution of the current loop, to go to outer loop the only thing you can do is set some flags and check it in outer loop

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continue or break is always for the most inner loop which accepts a continue or break. In this case, it's the lowest for loop in your code.

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It's not possible only with continue statement. Continue and break statement affect only the the most inner loop that their are nested.

You can set a variable and check it in the outer loop. Or reorganize the IF statement and the break condition in the for statement.

while (..)
{
   for (...; ...;...)
   {
        for(...;...;...)
            if ( )
            {
                 ...
                 skipLoop = true
            }
         if (skipLoop)
             continue;
    }
} 

Hope this helps!

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Oh :( I hoped a way existed, but... btw, thank you ;) –  Flo Jan 28 '11 at 9:25
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