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Basic C# question here.

What is the difference between creating an instance of a class property / field either as you declare it or in the constructor of the object in question. For example:

public class MyClass
{
    public MyObject = new MyObject();
}

vs

public class MyClass
{
    public MyObject;

    public MyCLass()
    {
        MyObject = new MyObject();
    }
}
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4 Answers

up vote 23 down vote accepted

A field with an initializer is initialized before the base constructor is called, whereas if the initializer is in the body, that only gets executed after the base constructor is called.

This can be relevant if the base constructor calls a virtual method - but personally I'd try to avoid that situation.

Sample code:

public class Base
{
    public Base()
    {
        Dump();
    }

    public virtual void Dump() {}
}

public class Child : Base
{
    private string x = "Initialized at declaration";
    private string y;

    public Child()
    {
        y = "Initialized in constructor";
    }

    public override void Dump()
    {
        Console.WriteLine(x); // Prints "Initialized at declaration"
        Console.WriteLine(y); // Prints "" as y is still null
    }
}
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+1 Also, my understanding is that initializing a field at the declaration allows the compiler/JITer to do some optimizations that it wouldn't otherwise do for an initialization in the constructor. I believe I read this in the ".NET Framework Design Guidelines" as their justification for preferring field initialization as a "best practice", but I'm not certain anymore. –  Cody Gray Jan 28 '11 at 10:35
    
@Cody: Not sure, to be honest. I personally wouldn't take that into account when writing code - I'd just stick to the clearest way of expressing intentions. –  Jon Skeet Jan 28 '11 at 10:35
    
@Jon Skeet mistake: Child class not inherited to Base in code –  Adeel Jan 28 '11 at 10:37
    
@Adeel: Thanks, fixed. –  Jon Skeet Jan 28 '11 at 10:47
2  
@Adeel: That's basically a bug in Reflector, IMO. Look at the IL (which you can still do within Reflector) and you'll see there's a difference in terms of the ordering of the assignment and the base constructor call. –  Jon Skeet Jan 28 '11 at 11:04
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I compile these C# code:

public class MyClass1
{
    public MyObject MyObject = new MyObject();
}
public class MyClass2
{
    public MyObject MyObject;

    public MyClass2()
    {
        MyObject = new MyObject();
    }
}

I got IL assembly:

MyClass1:

.class public auto ansi beforefieldinit test.MyClass1
       extends [mscorlib]System.Object
{
  .field public class test.MyObject MyObject
  .method public hidebysig specialname rtspecialname 
          instance void  .ctor() cil managed
  {
    // code size:       19 (0x13)
    .maxstack  8
    IL_0000:  ldarg.0
    IL_0001:  newobj     instance void test.MyObject::.ctor()
    IL_0006:  stfld      class test.MyObject test.MyClass1::MyObject
    IL_000b:  ldarg.0
    IL_000c:  call       instance void [mscorlib]System.Object::.ctor()
    IL_0011:  nop
    IL_0012:  ret
  } // end of method MyClass1::.ctor

} // end of class test.MyClass1

MyClass2:

.class public auto ansi beforefieldinit test.MyClass2
       extends [mscorlib]System.Object
{
  .field public class test.MyObject MyObject
  .method public hidebysig specialname rtspecialname 
          instance void  .ctor() cil managed
  {
    // code size:       21 (0x15)
    .maxstack  8
    IL_0000:  ldarg.0
    IL_0001:  call       instance void [mscorlib]System.Object::.ctor()
    IL_0006:  nop
    IL_0007:  nop
    IL_0008:  ldarg.0
    IL_0009:  newobj     instance void test.MyObject::.ctor()
    IL_000e:  stfld      class test.MyObject test.MyClass2::MyObject
    IL_0013:  nop
    IL_0014:  ret
  } // end of method MyClass2::.ctor
} // end of class test.MyClass2

It is prefectly clear that difference is only in the order of call to the base class constructor (System.Object::.ctor()), MyObject initializer (test.MyObject::.ctor()) and the class initializer (stfld class test.MyObject test.MyClass2::MyObject)

In the first case, MyClass1 initializes as follows:

  • MyObject initializer
  • class initializer (constructor assigment)
  • base class initializer (base class constructor)

But, MyClass2 initializes by that order:

  • base class initializer (base class constructor)
  • MyObject initializer
  • class initializer (constructor assigment)
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You can also use a static constructor that gets called before any other constructor where you can init static variables

public class Bus
{
   private static object m_object= null;

    // Static constructor:
    static Bus()
    {
        m_object = new object();

        System.Console.WriteLine("The static constructor invoked.");
    }

    public static void Drive()
    {
        System.Console.WriteLine("The Drive method invoked.");
    }
}

class TestBus
{
    static void Main()
    {
        Bus.Drive();
    }
}
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+1 True, and useful –  Artur Mustafin Jan 28 '11 at 11:53
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It's important to note that (in C#) the initializer assignment to the field will occur before the call to any base class constructor (as evidenced in this question about whether VB could be forced to do the same thing).

This means you can't use initializer syntax to reference a field of your base class (i.e. you can't directly translate this VB into C#):

Public Class Base
    Protected I As Int32 = 4
End Class

Public Class Class2
    Inherits Base

    Public J As Int32 = I * 10
End Class
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Haha, I was just about to post that as a comment to Jon Skeet's answer. –  Cody Gray Jan 28 '11 at 10:31
    
-1 That's not true, see my post –  Artur Mustafin Jan 28 '11 at 11:51
    
@Artur: Where do you get off downvoting this without reading it first? Your little test compiled the code in C#. Damien's answer here as well as my question that he links to explicitly point out that the behavior is different in VB.NET. –  Cody Gray Jan 28 '11 at 11:55
    
@Artur - which point isn't true? The assignment MyObject = new MyObject() in your answer (Class2) isn't an Initializer, it's just an assignment statement. Initializer has a specific meaning in C# –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jan 28 '11 at 11:56
    
@Cody Gray: "...In C#, the initializer assignment to the field will occur before the call to any base class constructor" - that's a LIE –  Artur Mustafin Jan 28 '11 at 11:59
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