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Is there any way to specify CMYK colours directly in a XAML document?

prefixing them with # character will create RGB colours, but how to specify a CMYK colour?

Some notes:

  1. The question is NOT about converting from CMYK to RGB but to use real CMYK
  2. The purpose is to allow generated XPS documents (using System.Windows.Xps.Packaging for example) see the colour as CMYK and generate colour codes as "ContextColor /swopcmykprofile.icc a,b,c,d,e" not as "#aarrggbb"

I have tried to define CMYK colours by using ColorContext without any success.

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So, if you create XPS document with this method, is it a correct CMYK xps document? –  Alireza Jan 12 '13 at 8:43
1  
Yes, XPS document stores the icc file internally and all colour references will be to that file. –  el_shayan Jan 12 '13 at 13:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

OK again! It turned out to be much more easier than what I though: CMYK is directly usable in XAML:

<Grid Background="ContextColor file://C:/WINDOWS/system32/spool/drivers/color/EuroscaleCoated.icc 1.0,0.0,0.0,1.0,1.0">
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How do you programmatically get these CMYK values? It seems that we only have access to the converted RGB as well as scRGB values, and the profile uri. –  Alireza Jan 26 '13 at 12:58
    
Figured it out myself: Color.GetNativeColorValues() –  Alireza Jan 26 '13 at 13:06
    
Well, did you also print these to PDF? The created pdf file does not respect color channels, so for instance, black goes to PDF to all channels. Do you know anything about this? Even, if we create an XPS and print it to PDF, the result still uses all inks for black. –  Alireza Apr 1 '13 at 12:26

OK! I found the answer:

The way that WPF uses colour models is by System.Windows.Media.Color's static constructor FromValues() and introducing a colour profile:

The following code, for example:

var c = Color.FromValues(
               new float[] {1.0f,0.0f,0.0f,0.0f } , 
               new Uri("file://C:/ICCProfile.icc",  UriKind.Absolute));

creates a 100% Cyan colour.

Profiles can be downloaded from http://www.eci.org/doku.php?id=en:start

I tested this solution with XpsDocumentWriter and I confirm that it creates the correct CMYK colour code.

For XAML it is just the matter of building an IValueConverter that converts something like "~C,M,Y,K" (as #RRGGBB for RGB) to a real CMYK colour.

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The plain answer is: no.

WPF doesn't know how to read/parse CMYK and doesn't know how to render CMYK.

The only two options are building the support yourself or having the WPF team add the functionality.

Thinking-out-loud: It might be possible to build a type that contains CMYK information but exposes ARGB. That way designers such as Visual Studio and Blend will still be able to render an image but the xaml would still contain the original CMYK information.

Prototype code (it doesn't work(yet)). What is missing is the 'implicit' conversion from CMYKColor to Color and I haven't tried a solution for that. Is this anything near what you would want/accept?

<DockPanel>
    <DockPanel.Resources>
        <t:CMYKColor x:Key="gridBackgroundColor" 
             C="..." M="..." Y="..." K="..." />
    </DockPanel.Resources>

    <Grid>
        <Grid.Background>
            <SolidColorBrush Color="{DynamicResource gridBackgroundColor}"/>
        </Grid.Background>

    </Grid>

</DockPanel>
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It is indeed what I had it mind. But how to make something like XpsDocumentWriter to understand and render CMYK colours? –  el_shayan Jan 29 '11 at 18:19
    
I am sorry, I don't know how to influence the rendering of the XpsDocumentWriter (if that is possible at all) –  Erno de Weerd Jan 29 '11 at 21:22

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