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Often, one needs several enumerated types together. Sometimes, one has a name clash. Two solutions to this come to mind: use a namespace, or use 'larger' enum element names. Still, the namespace solution has two possible implementations: a dummy class with nested enum, or a full blown namespace.

I'm looking for pros and cons of all three approaches.

Example:

// oft seen hand-crafted name clash solution
enum eColors { cRed, cColorBlue, cGreen, cYellow, cColorsEnd };
enum eFeelings { cAngry, cFeelingBlue, cHappy, cFeelingsEnd };
void setPenColor( const eColors c ) {
    switch (c) {
        default: assert(false);
        break; case cRed: //...
        break; case cColorBlue: //...
        //...
    }
 }


// (ab)using a class as a namespace
class Colors { enum e { cRed, cBlue, cGreen, cYellow, cEnd }; };
class Feelings { enum e { cAngry, cBlue, cHappy, cEnd }; };
void setPenColor( const Colors::e c ) {
    switch (c) {
        default: assert(false);
        break; case Colors::cRed: //...
        break; case Colors::cBlue: //...
        //...
    }
 }


 // a real namespace?
 namespace Colors { enum e { cRed, cBlue, cGreen, cYellow, cEnd }; };
 namespace Feelings { enum e { cAngry, cBlue, cHappy, cEnd }; };
 void setPenColor( const Colors::e c ) {
    switch (c) {
        default: assert(false);
        break; case Colors::cRed: //...
        break; case Colors::cBlue: //...
        //...
    }
  }
share|improve this question
10  
First of all, I would use Color::Red, Feeling:Angry, etc –  abatishchev Jan 27 '09 at 9:28
    
good question, i used the namespace method.... ;) –  MiniScalope Oct 19 '10 at 14:47
8  
the "c" prefix on everything hurts readability. –  User May 13 '11 at 17:10
3  
@User: why, thank you for opening the Hungarian discussion :) –  xtofl May 13 '11 at 20:37
4  
Note that you don't need to name the enum as in enum e {...}, enums can be anonymous, ie enum {...}, which makes much more sense when wrapped in namespace or class. –  kralyk Apr 6 '12 at 23:44

8 Answers 8

up vote 34 down vote accepted

The benefit from a namespace over a class is that you can use using declarations when you want.

The problem with using a namespace is that namespaces can be expanded elsewhere in the code. In a large project, you would not be guaranteed that two distinct enums don't both think they are called eFeelings

For simpler-looking code, I use a struct, as you presumably want the contents to be public.

If you're doing any of these practices, you are ahead of the curve and probably don't need to scrutinize this further.

Addendum

If you are using C++11, enum class will implicitly scope the enum values within the enum's name.

With enum class you will lose implicit conversions and comparisons to integer types, but in practice that may help you flag ambiguous or buggy code.

share|improve this answer
3  
I agree with the struct-idea. And thanks for the compliment:) –  xtofl Jan 27 '09 at 18:46
    
+1 I couldn't remember the C++11 "enum class" syntax. Without that feature, enums are incomplete. –  Jesdisciple Aug 28 '13 at 6:40
    
+1 for enum class tip. Just what I wanted. –  null Jun 24 at 23:50

FYI In C++0x there is a new syntax for cases like what you mentioned (see C++0x wiki page)

enum class eColors { ... };
enum class eFeelings { ... };
share|improve this answer

I would definitely avoid using a class for this; use a namespace instead. The question boils down to whether to use a namespace or to use unique ids for the enum values. Personally, I'd use a namespace so that my ids could be shorter and hopefully more self-explanatory. Then application code could use a 'using namespace' directive and make everything more readable.

From your example above:

using namespace Colors;

void setPenColor( const e c ) {
    switch (c) {
        default: assert(false);
        break; case cRed: //...
        break; case cBlue: //...
        //...
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Could you give a hint on why you would prefer a namespace over a class? –  xtofl Jan 27 '09 at 12:55
    
@xtofl : you can't write 'using class Colors` –  MSalters Jan 27 '09 at 15:23
1  
@MSalters: You also can't write Colors someColor = Red;, because namespace doesn't constitute a type. You would have to write Colors::e someColor = Red; instead, which is quite counter-intuitive. –  SasQ Dec 12 '12 at 2:15
    
@SasQ Wouldn't you have to use Colors::e someColor even with a struct/class if you wanted to use it in a switch statement? If you use an anonymous enum then the switch wouldn't be able to evaluate a struct. –  Macbeth's Enigma Jun 1 '13 at 19:54

An difference between using a class or a namespace is that the class cannot be reopened like a namespace can. This avoids the possibility that the namespace might be abused in the future, but there is also the problem that you cannot add to the set of enumerations either.

A possible benefit for using a class, is that they can be used as template type arguments, which is not the case for namespaces:

class Colors {
public:
  enum TYPE {
    Red,
    Green,
    Blue
  };
};

template <typename T> void foo (T t) {
  typedef typename T::TYPE EnumType;
  // ...
}

Personally, I'm not a fan of using, and I prefer the fully qualified names, so I don't really see that as a plus for namespaces. However, this is probably not the most important decision that you'll make in your project!

share|improve this answer
    
Not reopening classes is also a potential disadvantage. The list of colours is not finite either. –  MSalters Jan 27 '09 at 15:24
1  
I think not repoening a class is a potential advantage. If I want more colors, I would just recompile the class with more colors. If I cannot do this (say I don't have the code), then I don't want to touch it in any case. –  Thomas Eding Aug 24 '11 at 22:13
    
@MSalters: No possibility to reopen a class is not only not a disadvantage, but also a safety tool. Because when it'd be possible to reopen a class and add some values to the enum, it could break other library code which already depends on that enum and knows only the old set of values. It would then happily accept those new values, but break at runtime from not knowing what to do with them. Remember Open-Closed Principle: Class should be closed for modifying, but open for extending. By extending I mean not adding to the existing code, but wrapping over it with the new code (eg. deriving). –  SasQ Dec 12 '12 at 2:31
    
So when you want to extend the enum, you should make it a new type derived from the first (if only it were easily possible in C++... ;/ ). Then it could be safely used by the new code which understands those new values, but only the old values would be accepted (by converting them down) by the old code. They shouldn't accept any one from those new values as being of the wrong type (the extended one). Only the old values they understand are accepted as being of the correct (base) type (and accidentally also being of the new type, so it could be accepted by new code as well). –  SasQ Dec 12 '12 at 2:35

Since enums are scoped to their enclosing scope, it's probably best to wrap them in something to avoid polluting the global namespace and to help avoid name collisions. I prefer a namespace to class simply because namespace feels like a bag of holding, whereas class feels like a robust object (cf. the struct vs. class debate). A possible benefit to a namespace is that it can be extended later - useful if you're dealing with third-party code that you cannot modify.

This is all moot of course when we get enum classes with C++0x.

share|improve this answer
    
enum classes... need to look that up! –  xtofl Jan 27 '09 at 18:47

Advantage of using a class is that you can build a full-fledged class on top of it.

#include <cassert>

class Color
{
public:
    typedef enum
    {
        Red,
        Blue,
        Green,
        Yellow
    } enum_type;

private:
    enum_type _val;

public:
    Color(enum_type val = Blue)
        : _val(val)
    {
        assert(val <= Yellow);
    }

    operator enum_type() const
    {
        return _val;
    }
};

void SetPenColor(const Color c)
{
    switch (c)
    {
        case Color::Red:
            // ...
            break;
    }
}

As the above example shows, by using a class you can:

  1. prohibit (sadly, not compile-time) C++ from allowing a cast from invalid value,
  2. set a (non-zero) default for newly-created enums,
  3. add further methods, like for returning a string representation of a choice.

Just note that you need to declare operator enum_type() so that C++ would know how to convert your class into underlying enum. Otherwise, you won't be able to pass the type to a switch statement.

share|improve this answer
    
Is this solution somehow related to what is shown here?: en.wikibooks.org/wiki/More_C%2B%2B_Idioms/Type_Safe_Enum I'm thinking about how to make it a template that I don't have to rewrite this pattern every time I need to use it. –  SasQ Aug 12 '12 at 15:31
    
@SasQ: it seems similar, yes. That's probably the same idea. However, I'm not sure if a template is beneficial unless you're adding a lot of 'common' methods in there. –  Michał Górny Aug 12 '12 at 15:35
    
1. Not really true. You can have compile time check that the enum is valid, via const_expr, or via private constructor for an int. –  xryl669 Jan 16 at 18:04

I also tend to wrap my enums in classes.

As signaled by Richard Corden, the benefit of a class is that it is a type in the c++ sense and so you can use it with templates.

I have special toolbox::Enum class for my needs that I specialize for every templates which provides basic functions (mainly: mapping an enum value to a std::string so that I/O are easier to read).

My little template also has the added benefit of really checking for the allowed values. The compiler is kind of lax on checking if the value really is in the enum:

typedef enum { False: 0, True: 2 } boolean;
   // The classic enum you don't want to see around your code ;)

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
  boolean x = static_cast<boolean>(1);
  return (x == False || x == True) ? 0 : 1;
} // main

It always bothered me that the compiler will not catch this, since you are left with an enum value that has no sense (and that you won't expect).

Similarly:

typedef enum { Zero: 0, One: 1, Two: 2 } example;

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
  example y = static_cast<example>(3);
  return (y == Zero || y == One || y == Two) ? 0 : 1;
} // main

Once again main will return an error.

The problem is that the compiler will fit the enum in the smallest representation available (here we need 2 bits) and that everything that fits in this representation is considered a valid value.

There is also the problem that sometimes you'd rather have a loop on the possible values instead of a switch so that you don't have to modify all you switches each time you add a value to the enum.

All in all my little helper really ease things for my enums (of course, it adds some overhead) and it is only possible because I nest each enum in its own struct :)

share|improve this answer
3  
Interesting. Do you mind sharing the definition of your Enum class? –  momeara Dec 18 '10 at 22:46

I've hybridized the preceding answers to something like this:

I've got one big header file that contains all my project enums, because these enums are shared between worker classes and it doesn't make sense to put the enums in the worker classes themselves.

The struct avoids the public: syntactic sugar, and the typedef lets you actually declare variables of these enums within other worker classes.

I don't think using a namespace helps at all. Maybe this is because I'm a C# programmer, and there you have to use the enum type name when referring the values, so I'm used to it.

    struct KeySource {
        typedef enum { 
            None, 
            Efuse, 
            Bbram
        } Type;
    };

    struct Checksum {
        typedef enum {
            None =0,
            MD5 = 1,
            SHA1 = 2,
            SHA2 = 3
        } Type;
    };

    struct Encryption {
        typedef enum {
            Undetermined,
            None,
            AES
        } Type;
    };

    struct File {
        typedef enum {
            Unknown = 0,
            MCS,
            MEM,
            BIN,
            HEX
        } Type;
    };

...

class Worker {
    File::Type fileType;
    void DoIt() {
       switch(fileType) {
       case File::MCS: ... ;
       case File::MEM: ... ;
       case File::HEX: ... ;
    }
}
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