Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

i am little confused about the manual reset event's wait one method , consider below scenarion

static  object objLock = new object();

    static int counter = 5;

    static ManualResetEvent mEvent = new ManualResetEvent(false);

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        ///LeftShifting(10, 4);

       // RightShifting(3, 1);

       // Xoring(0001, 1001);

       // ExcahnageValuesWithXoring(10, 20);

       // ReverseBits(0);

        Thread.CurrentThread.Name = "Main Thread";

        for(int i=0;i<5;i++)
        {
            Thread t = new Thread(new ThreadStart(DoSomeLongWork));
            t.Name = i.ToString();
            t.Start();
        }

        Console.WriteLine("Current thread is " + Thread.CurrentThread.Name);

        mEvent.WaitOne();

        Console.WriteLine("Current thread is " + Thread.CurrentThread.Name);
        Console.WriteLine("Completed Long Running Process...");
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    private static void DoSomeLongWork()
    {

        Console.WriteLine("Starting Long Running Process...On " + Thread.CurrentThread.Name);

        Thread.Sleep(5000);

        Interlocked.Decrement(ref counter);

        Console.WriteLine("Ending Long Running Process...On " + Thread.CurrentThread.Name);

        if (counter == 0)
            mEvent.Set();

    }

my question is when i call mEvent.Waitone() is it going to block 'Main Thread' or the one of the executing child thread.

share|improve this question
    
Be careful when checking counter == 0. Another thread may have decremented the counter before the code reaches the if statement so that counter == 0 is never true for any thread. You may want to use counter <= 0 instead. – Jakob Christensen Jan 28 '11 at 11:20
1  
that's not a problem since i am using Interlocked Class it will work like a lock with optimization as far as i know. – TalentTuner Jan 28 '11 at 11:23
    
But the comparison is not within a lock so it is a problem. – Jakob Christensen Jan 28 '11 at 11:25
    
No if you are only reading a state of a varaible in threads and not modifying the state than it's not a problem and hopefully i am doing that :) – TalentTuner Jan 28 '11 at 11:27
    
This is what could happen: Counter is 1. Thread A decrements counter which is then 0. Before Thread A reaches the if statement, Thread B decrements the counter which is now -1. When Thread A reaches the if statement, the counter is -1. – Jakob Christensen Jan 28 '11 at 11:30
up vote 4 down vote accepted

It blocks the main thread. That's the only one it can block. You can't force another thread to sleep. The main thread will wait for the other thread to "set" the event. This is very much like Monitor.Wait/Pulse.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a Zillion Mr Skeet for such a quick and straight forward answer. Some time when i read MSDN it says , Wait one blocks current thread executing so causes some confusion in my mind. – TalentTuner Jan 28 '11 at 11:18
    
@Saurabh: I'm not sure why that causes confusion - the "current thread" is the one that's calling Wait. Anyway, glad the answer helped... – Jon Skeet Jan 28 '11 at 11:19
    
Thank you for clearing ... – TalentTuner Jan 28 '11 at 11:21

mEvent.WaitOne() will block the main thread until one of the child threads calls mEvent.Set().

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a Zillion Mr Fredrik for such a quick and straight forward answer. Some time when i read MSDN it says , Wait one blocks current thread executing so causes some confusion in my mind. – TalentTuner Jan 28 '11 at 11:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.