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Usually I put all of my Main method code inside of a try/catch block like so:

public static void Main(string[] args)
{
   try
   {
      // code
   }
   catch (Exception e)
   {
      // code
   }
}

I do this just in case any exceptions manage to slip out of the rest of the program logic, thus allowing me to do something about it, such as display it to console, log it to a file, etc. However, I have been told that this is bad practice.

Do you think it is bad practice?

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2  
depends what comes as //code –  Jigar Joshi Jan 28 '11 at 11:23
1  
Related question: stackoverflow.com/questions/2730078/… –  Cody Gray Jan 25 '12 at 17:50
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5 Answers

up vote 30 down vote accepted

Wrapping any piece of code in a try/catch block without a good reason is bad practice.

In the .NET programming model, exceptions should be reserved for truly exceptional cases or conditions. You should only to catch exceptions that you can actually do something about. Furthermore, you should should hardly ever catch the base System.Exception class (but rather prefer to catch the more specific, derived exception classes you can handle). And should a truly unexpected exception be encountered during the course of your program's execution, you actually should crash.

Obviously the "correct" answer would have to be made on a case-by-case basis, depending on what's going on inside that // code placeholder in your catch block. But if you're asking for a general rule or "best practice", you should always have a specific reason to catch exceptions, not just wrap all of your code in a giant try/catch block as a matter of course without thinking about it.

Note that if you're simply trying to catch any unhandled exceptions that might occur for the purposes of logging or error reporting, you should be using the AppDomain.UnhandledException event. This is a notification-only event, so it doesn't allow you to handle those exceptions, but it is the right place to implement your logging or error reporting functionality after your application has crashed.


EDIT: As I was catching up on my reading of Raymond Chen's excellent blog, "The Old New Thing", I noticed that he had recently published an article on a similar topic. It's specific to COM, rather than the .NET Framework, but the general concepts regarding error handling are equally applicable to both environments. I thought I'd share a couple of gems from the article here, in support of my [apparently quite controversial] opinion.

Historically, COM placed a giant try/except around your server's methods. If your server encountered what would normally be an unhandled exception, the giant try/except would catch it and turn it into the error RPC_E_SERVERFAULT. It then marked the exception as handled, so that the server remained running, thereby "improving robustness by keeping the server running even when it encountered a problem."

Mind you, this was actually a disservice.

The fact that an unhandled exception occurred means that the server was in an unexpected state. By catching the exception and saying, "Don't worry, it's all good," you end up leaving a corrupted server running.

[ . . . ]

Catching all exceptions and letting the process continue running assumes that a server can recover from an unexpected failure. But this is absurd. You already know that the server is unrecoverably toast: It crashed!

Much better is to let the server crash so that the crash dump can be captured at the point of the failure. Now you have a fighting chance of figuring out what's going on.

You can [and should] read the whole article here on his blog: How to turn off the exception handler that COM "helpfully" wraps around your server.

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1  
@gridzbi: Okay? So do it in the AppDomain.UnhandledException event. That's what it's designed for. Wrapping your code in a try/catch block is a generally bad idea, especially for something like this. A truly unhandled exception that you can't do anything about should cause your application to crash. Logging is a secondary concern, and a provision has been made for it. –  Cody Gray Jan 28 '11 at 11:33
2  
Never say "never". There are loads of cases where you have to catch System.Exception. E.g., if you're processing an arbitrary plugin call, which may throw anything, but you shoud kill it gracefully if anything fails. Or if you're interpreting an arbitrary code entered by a user, which may throw absolutely anything - in this case you have to show a stack trace to a user and return back to repl. –  SK-logic Jan 28 '11 at 12:04
    
@SK-logic: I'm not familiar with instances where the user can raise their own exceptions. And yes, I suppose there might be 3rd party libraries who get things wrong and raise System.Exception, but that's still no excuse for swallowing all of your code with a try/catch block. Mind you, the rest of my answer is pretty relenting about having to decide this on a case-by-case basis; the way I perceive the original question is as one of "best practice", not "is this ever conceivably justified?" –  Cody Gray Jan 28 '11 at 12:09
    
@Cody Gray, if it is a plugin, not a library, your application can carry on even if the plugin failed badly - just switch this plugin off and complain. Details of the failure are unimportant. Same for the case if there is an embedded scripting language, where a user is allowed to throw exceptions - it's quite a typical scenario. I was answering to your statement that it's not a good practice for ANY bit of a code, but of course I'd agree for Main(). –  SK-logic Jan 28 '11 at 12:14
1  
@Apalala: Yes. When you're debugging the application, that's all a fantastic idea. But NOT when you've deployed the application. Here's the problem: you're going to crash in the user's face either way. It doesn't make any sense at all to wrap the Main method in a try/catch block and re-throw the error as you suggested. The error already got thrown! It's already reached the highest level. You accomplish nothing by rethrowing it. And I've already explained how you log the error. There's a method built in for that; no reason for try/catch. –  Cody Gray Jan 30 '11 at 7:17
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If you're doing the most intelligent thing you can with the error, it's good practice. That's what try/catch is for.

If you're just throwing the error away (or logging it and throwing it away) — especially if you're doing so regardless of the type of exception — that's considered bad practice.

This might raise the question: what if the most intelligent thing is to log it and throw it away? I want to say that would be an exceptional case. But in practice, my code would assert otherwise. I guess I indulge in a lot of bad practice.

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I would agree, except that you still should never catch System.Exception. You would catch a more specific, derived exception that you could conceivably do something about. –  Cody Gray Jan 28 '11 at 11:24
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I aggree with 90% of what Cody says. There are some situations similar to the pluggin example where you may want to catch system exceptions. Here is another example consider consuming a WCF web service.

Goal: Consume the service and dispose even if an error is encountered. Allow the error to bubble.

public static bool DoRemoteWebServiceWork()
{
    bool result;
    RemoteWebServiceClient client = new RemoteWebServiceClient();
    try
    {
        result = client.DoWork();
        client.Close();
    }
    catch (Exception)
    {
        client.Abort(); //dispose
        throw;//This service is critical to application function. The application should break if an exception is thrown.
        //could log end point and binding exceptions to avoid ignoring changes to the remote service that require updates to our code.
    }
    return result;
}

Goal: Consume the service and dispose even if an error is encountered. Prevent the error from bubbling.

public static bool DoRemoteWebServiceWork()
{
    bool result;
    RemoteWebServiceClient client = new RemoteWebServiceClient();
    try
    {
        result = client.DoWork();
        client.Close();
    }
    catch (Exception)
    {
        client.Abort(); //dispose
        //throw; //This service is auxiliary to the applications primary function. We have no influence over the service and therefore cannot fix it.
        //could log end point and binding exceptions to avoid ignoring changes to the remote service that require updates to our code.
    }
    return result;
}
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Definetly, yes, it is a bad practice, to use Exception class

You should care about types of an exception, not cutting all exceptions on catch block, preventing them to inform system of the error.

Exception class is a base class, and, is a top-level exception can be catched in code. Use the most specific Exceptions in catch block, specifically, the only that, which you code raises in a try {...} catch{...} block, and only if it can be effectively resolved on that particular level (in a function, where try.. catch block is declared)

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That depends on what you do if you catch an error. If you just catch all errors to appear to handle them gracefully - bad practice. I'd say it is bad practice even if you only log there - log locally.

If you really do something to recover the error (e.g. you threw it yourself and know what to do about it) - I'd vote OK :)

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