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Is there a way to change the command line arguments in a bash script. Say for example, a bash script is invoked the following way:

./foo arg1 arg2  

Is there a way to change the value of arg1 within the script? Say, something like

$1="chintz"  

Thanks,
Sriram

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2 Answers 2

up vote 37 down vote accepted

You have to reset all arguments. To change e.g. $3:

$ set -- "${@:1:2}" "new" "${@:4}"

EDIT:

Basically you set all arguments to their current values, except for the one(s) that you want to change.

The "${@:1:2}" notation is expanded to the two (hence the 2 in the notation) positional arguments starting from offset 1 (i.e. $1). It is a shorthand for "$1" "$2" in this case, but it is much more useful when you want to replace e.g. "${17}".

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so, in order to change $3, I must change $1 and $2 as well, is it? And change them to what? What does "reset" mean? –  Sriram Jan 28 '11 at 11:31
    
To $1 and $2, of course. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jan 28 '11 at 11:33
    
+1: That is very neat! –  Johnsyweb Jan 28 '11 at 12:39
    
worked like a charm!! that is super neat! thanks! –  Sriram Feb 11 '11 at 7:59
    
Thanks for the trick! I had difficulty using this for filenames with embedded spaces. For anyone else who may run into that problem, try putting eval at the front of the line per this. –  cxw Oct 30 '13 at 20:06
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You are better off assigning $1 and $2 to more meaningful variables (I don't know, input_filename = $1 and output_filename = $2 or something) and then overwriting one of those variables (input_filename = 'chintz'), leaving the input to the script unchanged, in case it is needed elsewhere.

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I wanted an approach where I could alter one of the input arguments itself. I needed to do that since I wanted to return a value from the script. The answer suggested by thkala worked well. Thanks for the response!!! –  Sriram Feb 11 '11 at 8:00
1  
@Johnsyweb Agreed. For readability sake, yours is the better method. –  Dss Mar 18 at 13:14
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