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Can class.forName take generic parameters? It looks unlikely given that java does type erasure, so that no generic type info. available at runtime.

If so what will be the behaviour if I pass generic parameter? does it throw?

I want to take a custom comparator class of type

Comparator<String[]> 

and instantiate it. what is the most type safe way to rewrite this? Can I avoid

Comparator<String[]> 

cast at all?

this.keyComparer =
(Comparator<String[]>) Class.forName(comparatorClass).asSubclass(
      Class.forName("Comparator<String[]>")
 ).newInstance();
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Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/2012306/… –  finnw Jan 28 '11 at 12:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Have you tried? I guess, no, because:

 Class.forName("java.util.List<String>");

throws the expected runtime exception.

And this is expected, because the javaDoc says:

A call to forName("X") causes the class named X to be initialized.

And java.util.List<String> is not a class name. (It contains a classname, but it is something else)

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Actually in C# something equivalent is a valid class [type] name. For List<String> we have:Type.GetType("System.Collections.Generic.List`1[[System.String, mscorlib]], mscorlib"). Although I can see why it should be invalid in Java from implementation details. Anyway is there anyway I can simplify my code snippet? I get a warning - unchecked cast. –  Fakrudeen Jan 28 '11 at 14:03
    
So I guess there is really no way than suppressing this warning. Accepting this as it answers the former part of the question. –  Fakrudeen Feb 21 '11 at 12:49

In order to create newInstance() by reflection you should do :

Class<ArrayList<String>> list = (Class<ArrayList<String>>)
                                Class.forName("java.util.ArrayList");
ArrayList<String> l = list.newInstance();

Now you can init. your comparator class like that

Have a look at Java Generics FAQ for more information

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