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How to convert string to stream in java without using bytearrayinputstream and example?

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you can try: InputStreamReader isr = new InputStreamReader(IOUtils.toInputStream(myString)); – Harry Joy Jan 28 '11 at 13:33
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What's wrong with 'bytearrayinputstream'? – Nikita Rybak Jan 28 '11 at 13:33
    
Give me example ? – saran Jan 28 '11 at 13:36
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Harry, the toInputStream(String) still uses ByteArrayInputStream: docjar.com/docs/api/org/apache/commons/io/… – Steven Jan 28 '11 at 13:37
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@biziclop - that's what comment upvotes are for :-) – Stephen C Jan 28 '11 at 13:43

You could extend the InputStream class and implement the read() method such that it returns data from a String.

But it would be really useless to do that when using a ByteArrayInputStream is so much simpler and easier.

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I thought this might be a J2ME thing, but ByteArrayInputStream is part of the the profiles. Perhaps this is just a lame interview question ... – Stephen C Jan 28 '11 at 13:47
    
perhaps it is a memory concern? – Steven Jan 28 '11 at 21:36

InputStream is = new StringInputStream(string);

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Or new StringReader(string) if you actually want a Reader. – Peter Lawrey Jan 28 '11 at 13:37
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Where is that class from? – Michael Borgwardt Jan 28 '11 at 13:39
    
it's part of ant tools... – Steven Jan 28 '11 at 13:39
    
    
@nIKUNJ: take a look at the actual current API doc. You will not find that class. It seems to have been from a beta version of Java 1.0 and dropped before the final release. Look at the date in the URL... – Michael Borgwardt Jan 28 '11 at 13:51

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