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I'm trying to wrap the Data.Binary.Put monad into another so that later I can ask it questions like "how many bytes it's going to write" or "what is the current position in file". But even very trivial wraps like:

data Writer1M a = Writer1M { write :: P.PutM a }
or
data Writer2M a = Writer2M { write :: (a, P.Put) }

create a huge space leak and the program usually crashes (after taking up 4GB of RAM). Here is what I've tried so far:

-- This works well and consumes almost no memory.

type Writer = P.Put

writer :: P.Put -> Writer
writer put = put

writeToFile :: String -> Writer -> IO ()
writeToFile path writer = BL.writeFile path (P.runPut writer)

-- This one will cause memory leak.

data Writer1M a = Writer1M { write :: P.PutM a }

instance Monad Writer1M where
  return a = Writer1M $ return a
  ma >>= f = Writer1M $ (write ma) >>= \a -> write $ f a

type WriterM = Writer1M
type Writer = WriterM ()

writer :: P.Put -> Writer
writer put = Writer1M $ put

writeToFile :: String -> Writer -> IO ()
writeToFile path writer = BL.writeFile path (P.runPut $ write writer)
-- This one will crash as well with exactly the
-- same memory foot print as Writer1M

data Writer2M a = Writer2M { write :: (a, P.Put) }

instance Monad Writer2M where
  return a = Writer2M $ (a, return ())
  ma >>= f = Writer2M $ (b, p >> p')
                        where (a,p) = write ma
                              (b,p') = write $ f a

type WriterM = Writer2M
type Writer = WriterM ()

writer :: P.Put -> Writer
writer put = Writer2M $ ((), put)

writeToFile :: String -> Writer -> IO ()
writeToFile path writer = BL.writeFile path (P.runPut $ snd $ write writer)

I'm new to Haskell and this makes no sence to me, but the wrapper monads seem very trivial so I'm guessing there is something obvious I'm missing.

Thanks for looking.

UPDATE: Here is a sample code that demonstrates the problem: http://hpaste.org/43400/why_wrapping_the_databinaryp

UPDATE2: There is also a second part to this question here.

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1  
What compiler flags are you using? –  C. A. McCann Jan 28 '11 at 14:36
    
After you asked I tried with -O2 (I used none before) but the memory foot print did not change. –  Peter Jankuliak Jan 28 '11 at 14:49
    
Could you post a trivial test program so others here don't have to build their own? –  Thomas M. DuBuisson Jan 28 '11 at 15:29
    
Good idea, I'll compile something soon. Can I somehow post it here on stackoverflow or should I use hpaste instead? –  Peter Jankuliak Jan 28 '11 at 15:50
3  
I've tried your sample and with my GHC 6.12.3 and -O2 flag both versions show almost identical time/space behavior. Replacing data in "problematic" wrapper with newtype reduces the difference even further. Without -O2 it's definitely memory-greedy. You sure you recompiled with -O2? Try -O2 -fforce-recomp –  Ed'ka Jan 28 '11 at 22:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

After poking around for a bit, I found that the problem seems to be the usage of binary's (>>=) to implement (>>). The following addition to the Writer1M monad implementation solves the problem:

  m >> k = Writer1M $ write m >> write k

Whereas this version still leaks memory:

  m >> k = Writer1M $ write m >>= const (write k)

Looking at binary's source, (>>) seems to discard the result of the first monad explicitly. Not sure how exactly this prevents the leak, though. My best theory is that GHC otherwise holds onto the PairS object, and the "a" reference leaks because it never gets looked at.

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Did you tried to make the monad more strict? Eg. try to make the constructors of your datatyp strict / replace them with a newtype.

I don't know what's the exact problem here, but this is the usual source of leaks.

PS: And try to remove unnecessary lambdas, for instance:

  ma >>= f = Writer1M $ (write ma) >=> write . f
share|improve this answer
    
Changing from data to newtype is what the good folks at #haskell have suggested as well, unfortunatelly changing that and removing the lambda as you suggested did not change the memory foot print. But thanks for suggestion. –  Peter Jankuliak Jan 28 '11 at 14:32
    
Did you tried profiling as well? –  FUZxxl Jan 28 '11 at 14:34
    
Yes, here is the result: i.imgur.com/4Q2E3.png , the yellow area appears when I use one of the wrappers. –  Peter Jankuliak Jan 28 '11 at 14:41
    
Very strange. I think I can't help you. –  FUZxxl Jan 28 '11 at 15:07
    
I'd guess that the Writer1M is inadvertently acting as a retainer, holding a pointer to the output and thereby preventing the GC from reaping the bytestrings along the way. Try running with retainer profiling and see if that tells you anything. –  Paul Johnson Jan 28 '11 at 20:08

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