Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have noticed on some sites that utilise a fluid layout, it is possible to remove elements on the page and replace elements when the window is shrunk to a smaller size, obviously to make the content easier to view.

ex: http://simplebits.com/

My question is.. what css is being used to make this happen (if it is css, perhaps JavaScript..)? what should I look at in order to learn more about this technique?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
Sites such as..? –  David Thomas Jan 28 '11 at 13:53
    
@David good point, added. –  Alex Jan 28 '11 at 13:57
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The stylesheet contains different rules for when the screen is less than 800px wide. If you look at the stylesheet for the page the on line 983 there is a @media rule as follows:

@media screen and (max-width: 800px) {
  /* Alternate rules here*/
}

This is a CSS3 feature so I guess that the site does not restyle as nicely for older browsers. Details of media queries can be seen at http://www.w3.org/TR/css3-mediaqueries/#width

share|improve this answer
    
excellent response! many thanks :) –  Alex Jan 28 '11 at 15:22
add comment

It uses CSS Media Queries. Look at the end of the CSS file:

http://simplebits.com/-/css/styles.css

share|improve this answer
add comment

This type of design is more commonly known as "responsive" design, whereas "fluid" design is usually referred to as design that isn't fixed width.

You can use CSS media queries to produce designs like this.

share|improve this answer
add comment

An interesting article about this technique (which is called responsive design, as Jim pointed out):

http://www.alistapart.com/articles/responsive-web-design/

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.