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Afternoon,

I'm calculating the difference between two dates using JS. I am trying to get a result accurate to a second. I've been getting on very well with it, but noticed an issue. The first two dates shown below show a difference of 5 years, but as soon as I add one more year to the future date, it shows 5 years, 1 Day. Where is the extra day coming from? When the future date hits 2020, it adds another day into the result, this is a recurring pattern. Can someone enlighten me? I don't have any leap year calculations involved yet, I've put my code below:

$(document).ready(function(){

    var todaysDate = new Date('2010/11/24 23:00:00');   
    var futureDate = new Date('2020/11/24 22:59:00');

    calculateTime(todaysDate,futureDate);
});

function calculateTime(todaysDate,futureDate){  
    var difference = futureDate.getTime() - todaysDate.getTime(); 

    var years = Math.floor(difference/1000/60/60/24/365);
        difference -= years*1000*60*60*24*365;

    var days = Math.floor(difference/1000/60/60/24);
        difference -= days*1000*60*60*24;

    var hours = Math.floor(difference/1000/60/60);
        difference -= hours*1000*60*60;

    var minutes = Math.floor(difference/1000/60);
        difference -= minutes*60*1000;

    var seconds = Math.floor(difference/1000);

    var result = years + ' Years, ';
        result += days + ' Days, ';
        result += hours + ' Hours, ';
        result += minutes + ' Minutes, ';
        result += seconds + ' Seconds';

    $('#time').html(result)
 }
share|improve this question
    
Leap years, most likely. –  Marc B Jan 28 '11 at 14:01
    
Definitly a leap year issue. –  Exelian Jan 28 '11 at 14:14
    
There are 10 years between 2010 and 2020, not 5. –  dolmen Mar 29 '11 at 10:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yep, 2020 is a leap year, so if your initial test was for 2010-2019, then you try 2010-2020, there's an extra day due to the leap year. Even if you're not explicitly handling leap years, the Javascript date object is Leap-year aware, so the difference will include an extra day's worth of seconds.

Try doing a difference between

1) 2010/11/24 -> 2020/02/28
2) 2010/11/24 -> 2020/03/01

You should end up with with 86,400,000 more in the difference.

share|improve this answer
    
So this isn't an error in my coding, it's actually adding leap years so I don't need to worry about them? –  Henryz Jan 28 '11 at 14:11
1  
The date object would be pretty useless if it didn't handle them. You'll find that pretty much any language's date-handling libraries will automatically take leap years into account. –  Marc B Jan 28 '11 at 14:36

The biggest error is to not have written a test suite:

  1. To check for edge case you know at development time
  2. To easily check later for other edge case you discover
  3. Testable code is usually more modular (see below the mock object I had to create to workaround the strong link of your function to jQuery: it would have been easier if the jQuery call had been out of calculateTime)

This is called test-driven development.

Now here are some others errors I've found:

  1. Your date strings format does not respect the specification. Your system understand your format, but some may not.
  2. Your date strings do not specify a timezone, so you will have issues on locale which have daylight saving.
  3. Your function will give you effective elapsed time, but that may not be what your users are interested in. In particular when daylight saving is involved: you may have +1/-1 hour.

Here is a test suite that works from a Windows command line prompt (use cscript testsuite.js to run it):

// jQuery mock object for calculateTime testing
// $('#time').html(result) => result is stored in $.result
var $ = (function() {
    var $, $$ = {
        html: function(result) {
            $.result = result
        }
    }
    return $ = function(ignore) {
        return $$
    }
})();

// Henryz's unmodified function
function calculateTime(todaysDate,futureDate) {
    var difference = futureDate.getTime() - todaysDate.getTime(); 

    var years = Math.floor(difference/1000/60/60/24/365);
        difference -= years*1000*60*60*24*365;

    var days = Math.floor(difference/1000/60/60/24);
        difference -= days*1000*60*60*24;

    var hours = Math.floor(difference/1000/60/60);
        difference -= hours*1000*60*60;

    var minutes = Math.floor(difference/1000/60);
        difference -= minutes*60*1000;

    var seconds = Math.floor(difference/1000);

    var result = years + ' Years, ';
        result += days + ' Days, ';
        result += hours + ' Hours, ';
        result += minutes + ' Minutes, ';
        result += seconds + ' Seconds';

    return $('#time').html(result)
}

function test(a, b, expected) {
    var toString = Object.prototype.toString;
    if (toString.apply(a) != '[object Date]') a = new Date(a);
    if (toString.apply(b) != '[object Date]') b = new Date(b);
    calculateTime(a, b);
    var got = $.result;
    WScript.Echo(
        got === expected
        ? "ok"
        : "not ok - ["+a.toString()+"] to ["+b.toString()+"]\r\n#      Got: "+got+"\r\n# Expected: "+expected
    );
}

test('2010/11/24 23:00:00', '2011/11/24 23:00:00', '1 Years, 0 Days, 0 Hours, 0 Minutes, 0 Seconds');
test('Nov 24, 2010 23:00:00', 'Nov 24, 2011 23:00:00', '1 Years, 0 Days, 0 Hours, 0 Minutes, 0 Seconds');
test('2010/11/24 23:00:00', '2020/11/24 22:59:00', '10 Years, 0 Days, 0 Hours, 0 Minutes, 0 Seconds');
test('2011/03/26 23:00:00', '2011/03/27 23:00:00', '0 Years, 1 Days, 0 Hours, 0 Minutes, 0 Seconds');
test('2010/10/30 23:00:00', '2010/10/31 23:00:00', '0 Years, 1 Days, 0 Hours, 0 Minutes, 0 Seconds');

Here is my output (local timezone (France) offset changed on 2010-10-31 and 2011-03-26):

ok
ok
not ok - [Wed Nov 24 23:00:00 UTC+0100 2010] to [Tue Nov 24 22:59:00 UTC+0100 2020]
#      Got: 10 Years, 2 Days, 23 Hours, 59 Minutes, 0 Seconds
# Expected: 10 Years, 0 Days, 0 Hours, 0 Minutes, 0 Seconds
not ok - [Sat Mar 26 23:00:00 UTC+0100 2011] to [Sun Mar 27 23:00:00 UTC+0200 2011]
#      Got: 0 Years, 0 Days, 23 Hours, 0 Minutes, 0 Seconds
# Expected: 0 Years, 1 Days, 0 Hours, 0 Minutes, 0 Seconds
not ok - [Sat Oct 30 23:00:00 UTC+0200 2010] to [Sun Oct 31 23:00:00 UTC+0100 2010]
#      Got: 0 Years, 1 Days, 1 Hours, 0 Minutes, 0 Seconds
# Expected: 0 Years, 1 Days, 0 Hours, 0 Minutes, 0 Seconds

So you should completely rewrite the function or better, use an existing, tested implementation.

share|improve this answer

Yes, the problem is with leap years. Your line

var years = Math.floor(difference/1000/60/60/24/365);

isn't calculating the number of years difference between the two dates, it's calculating the number of 365-day periods between them instead

share|improve this answer
    
Same problem for days: the function counts 24 hours, not days. There is a difference when daylight saving is involved. See my testsuite in my answer. –  dolmen Mar 29 '11 at 11:17

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