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How do I get the previous line of a file after searching for one line?

Example: There is a file called fore.dat containing:

:Server:APBS

        :Max Blocking queue:20

:Transport:000

        :Server:APBS

        :Max Transactions:10

        :MaxConnections:1

:Transport:001

        :Server:APBS

        :Max Transactions:10

        :MaxConnections:1

:Transport:005
        :Server:BIT

        :Max Transactions:10

        :Max Connections:1

:Transport:004

        :Server:APBS

        :Max Transactions:44440

        :Max Connections:1

:Transport:002

        :Server:BET

        :Max Transactions:10

        :Max Connections:1

:Transport:003

        :Server:APBS

        :Max Transactions:50

        :Max Connections:1

I want to print the Transport number containing server name as APBS. i.e; the output as:

:Transport:000

:Transport:001

:Transport:004

:Transport:003
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1  
Since 'grep -B1' is not working, you're not using Linux. Unfortunately, these days, you have to stipulate that you are not using Linux or you will get the answer using the GNU tools, which have many extensions over non-Linux tools. Sometimes, it just means GNU is more accurately POSIX compliant than Linux. One option, of course, is to install the GNU tools (but don't install them over the ones in the system bin directories). –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 28 '11 at 14:50

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This looks like a job for awk and it should even work on AIX where you don't have gawk...

% awk -F':' '
/^:Transport:/ {
    transport = $0
}

NF == 3 && $2 == "Server" && $3 == "APBS" {
    printf "%s\n\n", transport
}

' fore.dat


:Transport:000

:Transport:001

:Transport:004

:Transport:003

Explanation:

  • Call awk
  • Treat ':' as the field separator.
  • For any lines starting with ':Transport:', store that entire line as transport.
  • For any lines with three fields where the second is "Server" and the third is "APBS", print the last stored value of transport followed by a pair of newlines.
  • use fore.dat as the input file.

There are a number of different ways you could do this. This is just one.

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You need to give a little more detail about what language you are working with.

Here is what I would do. I would scan each line of the file. I would put the 'last read' line into a buffer. If the next line contains what you are looking for, output the line that is stored in the buffer.

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But if the file is too large its difficult to read the whole file. so i want to grep to particular word and print hte previous line. iam working with unix. –  suvitha Jan 28 '11 at 14:28
    
I'm not sure I follow. You'll probably need to write a script that does this. grep is also going to read through the whole file line at a time. What scripting languages do you have available in your Unix environment? Python, perl, bash? –  Jordan Parmer Jan 28 '11 at 19:29
    
@suvitha: What do you mean by "its [sic.]difficult to read the whole file"? @j0rd4n is not suggesting reading the whole file into memory, just scanning line-by-line and storing a single line into a buffer. This is what grep or awk (as per my answer) would do. –  Johnsyweb Jan 29 '11 at 12:11

grep -B1 APBS <filename> returns the line containing APBS and the line just above it.

grep -B1 APBS <filename>| grep Transport would return lines with Transport numbers.

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but grep -B1 is not working –  suvitha Jan 28 '11 at 14:38
    
it displays as not a recognised falg. –  suvitha Jan 28 '11 at 14:40
    
Try grep -B 1 with a space between the B and the 1. The grep I use has documentation and support for the -B flag with and without a space. What does grep -V tell you? –  dyno Jan 28 '11 at 14:50
    
Nit pick - the data shown has blank lines, so you might need '-B2' instead. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 28 '11 at 14:52
    
@dyno: GNU grep has the useful '-B n' and '-A n' options; standard Unix 'grep' does not. The options are extensions over the POSIX standard interface to grep. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 28 '11 at 14:53

Before reading a line (actual_line), store the line you have in a temp variable (previous_line). When you find the one you need (actual_line is the one you look for), just return the previous one (previous_line)

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Given that you are not using GNU grep and assuming you cannot get it installed, then you have to fall back on other tools. This is a script I called 'sgrep' which, as you can see from the date information, is fairly old but was written for Xenix, SunOS (pre-dates Solaris), HP-UX, AIX and a legion of other long-gone variants of Unix. It does the job fairly thoroughly - it is more comprehensive than you currently need.

:   "$Id: sgrep.sh,v 1.3 1989/05/12 10:24:14 john Exp $"
#
#   Special grep
#   Finds a pattern and prints lines either side of the pattern
#   Line numbers are always produced by ed (substitute for grep),
#   which allows us to eliminate duplicate lines cleanly.  If the
#   user did not ask for numbers, these are then stripped out.
#
#   BUG: if the pattern occurs in in the first line or two and
#   the number of lines to go back is larger than the line number,
#   it fails dismally.

set -- `getopt "f:b:n" "$@"`

case $# in
0)  echo "Usage: $0 [-n] [-f x] [-b y] pattern [files]" >&2
    exit 1;;
esac

number="'s/^\\([0-9][0-9]*\\)   /\\1:/'"
filename="'s%^%%'"      # No-op for sed

f=3
b=3
nflag=no
while [ $# -gt 0 ]
do
    case $1 in
    -f) f=$2; shift 2;;
    -b) b=$2; shift 2;;
    -n) nflag=yes; shift;;
    --) shift; break;;
    *)  echo "Unknown option $1" >&2
        exit 1;;
    esac
done
pattern="${1:?'No pattern'}"
shift

case $# in
0)  tmp=${TMPDIR:-/tmp}/`basename $0`.$$
    trap "rm -f $tmp ; exit 1" 0
    cat - >$tmp
    set -- $tmp
    sort="sort -t: -u +0n -1"
    ;;
*)  filename="'s%^%'\$file:%"
    sort="sort -t: -u +1n -2"
    ;;
esac

for file in $*
do
    {
    ed - $file <<-!
    g/$pattern/.-${b},.+${f}n
    !
    } |
    eval sed -e "$number" -e "$filename" \| $sort |
    case $nflag in
    yes)    cat -;;
    no)     sed 's/[0-9][0-9]*://';;
    esac
done

rm -f $tmp
trap 0
exit 0

I had to dig it out of the fossil-beds where I keep ancient software. I have a Perl script that does basically the same job; I don't use either very often since I normally have GNU grep installed.

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