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I have implemented a simple iterator in perl. I normally work with C#, and use iterators and functional programming quite frequently. So I thought it would be simple to get some basics working in perl.

Problem is, I'm getting some poor performance, I don't expect be any faster than for or foreach, but I thought someone could give me some insight in how to speed it up.

Here is the guts of my package:

package Iterator;
use strict;

#Constructor for Iterator type
sub new {
  my $type = $_[0];
  my $this = {};

  #set default values
  $this->{Array} = @_[1];
  $this->{Index} = 0;
 $this->{Sub} = sub { 
   my @array = @{$this->{Array}};
   return $#array >= $this->{Index} ? $array[$this->{Index}++] : undef;
  };

  #return self
  bless($this, $type);
  return $this;
}

#Iterates next
sub Next {
 return $_[0]->{Sub}->();
}

Allows you to do this:

my $iterator = Iterator->new(\@array);
while (defined(my $current = $iterator->Next())) {
  print $current, "\n";
}

Not flashy... yet.

Also enables some functional code like this:

my $sum = 0;
Iterator
  ->new(\@array)
  ->Where(sub { $_[0] % 2 == 0 })
  ->ForEach(sub { $sum += $_[0] });

Which would sum up all the even values of an array.

My bottleneck is the iteration code:

$this->{Sub} = sub { 
   my @array = @{$this->{Array}};
   return $#array >= $this->{Index} ? $array[$this->{Index}++] : undef;
  };

Any pointers to speed this up?

share|improve this question
5  
What are the expected advantages of this solution in comparison to regular map, grep, List::Util and List::MoreUtils? –  zoul Jan 28 '11 at 14:29
1  
I am doing some complicated algorithms (box packing problem), and functional programming is helping greatly. Converting normal foreachs to code similar to above has already cut down 100 lines of code (33% approx) or so. Also helps with maintainability, since it forces your subs to be more pure (no global vars). –  jonathanpeppers Jan 28 '11 at 14:32
2  
Functional programming is great. What makes you think that map, grep and company are not functional programming? I might be wrong, but it seems to me like you are just wrapping already working solutions in OO boilerplate. –  zoul Jan 28 '11 at 14:35
2  
You're writing OO modules, to produce functional interfaces, in perl. Really? zoul has it right, map, grep et al are far better suited. Don't try to make perl look like C#, please. –  ptomli Jan 28 '11 at 14:56
1  
FWIW: there are array iterators written in C available to you in List::MoreUtils. –  Ether Jan 28 '11 at 16:49

9 Answers 9

up vote 5 down vote accepted

A bit late to the game here, but since you are concerned about performance, one of the largest bottlenecks in iterator type code is that the fields of your hash based object need to be dereferenced on each access. One way to combat this is to use closures in which the fields are closed over variables, avoiding unneeded dereferencing.

In my module List::Gen which contains a fairly performant implementation of lazy lists, I wrote the utility function curse which makes closure based objects behave like normal Perl objects.

Here is a short example of your iterator class written with curse. In a simple benchmark summing 1000 numbers, this method is twice as fast as yours, even after fixing all of the inefficiencies noted in the other answers.

{package Iterator;
    use List::Gen 'curse';
    sub new {
        my ($class, $array) = @_;
        my $index = 0;
        curse {
            next  => sub {$$array[$index++]},
            index => sub :lvalue {$index},
        } => $class
    }
    sub reset {shift->index = 0}
} 

If you are really pushing for more speed, since the next method does not need to be passed anything, you could even write:

my $next = $iterator->can('next');

while (defined (my $x = $next->()) {...}

Which will give you a 30% to 40% speed boost over a normal method call.

You can read the source of List::Gen for more advanced usage of curse

share|improve this answer
    
I believe this may be the best answer so far, if it has the performance gains you say. I will give it a try, but it might take a little bit to put into my implementation. –  jonathanpeppers Jan 28 '11 at 19:55
    
+1, very cool. Gave me a 43% speedup over the version I posted. –  tster Jan 28 '11 at 20:31
    
Using $next->() gave me a 58% speed improvement. –  tster Jan 28 '11 at 20:34

You might find it useful to read a bit of Higher Order Perl.

share|improve this answer
    
I have seen that, although a quick glance over the PDF, did not find a better implementation of an iterator over an array. –  jonathanpeppers Jan 28 '11 at 14:39
    
@Jonathon.Peppers, because Perl already has one. It's call shift. –  tster Jan 28 '11 at 15:04

this line:

my @array = @{$this->{Array}};

duplicates the array into @array, and I don't think you want to. Just do $#{$this->{Array}} to find the endpoint of your array.

share|improve this answer
    
Trying this with my Benchmark tests. –  jonathanpeppers Jan 28 '11 at 14:44
    
Much better!, I'll mark you as answer if we can't scrape any more perf out of it. –  jonathanpeppers Jan 28 '11 at 14:46

A much more efficient version:

package Iterator;
use strict;

#Constructor for Iterator type
sub new {
  my $type = shift;
  my $array = shift;
  my $this = {};
  $this->{array} = $array;
  $this->{index} = 0;
  bless($this, $type);
  return $this;
}

#Iterates next
sub Next {
  my $this = shift;
  return $this->{array}->[$this->{index}++];
}
share|improve this answer
    
Is shift faster than my ($this) = @_? shift modifies the contents of the array @_, right? Still I will try my benchmarks. –  jonathanpeppers Jan 28 '11 at 15:06
4  
@Jonathan.Peppers, If you are worried about the performance of shift vs. $_[0] then you are worried about the wrong thing. The function call itself is much more expensive than either of those operations. –  tster Jan 28 '11 at 15:08
    
I just pointed out shift versus @_, as this is the only different between the code above. It seems your changes are actually a little slower with my benchmarks. shift modifies the size of the array, while declaring the new my variable in the Next sub create overhead as well. I agree the function is more expensive than either. –  jonathanpeppers Jan 28 '11 at 16:28
    
On my computer using my $this = shift takes 26-27 seconds with my benchmarks. Using $_[0] both times takes 28 seconds. –  tster Jan 28 '11 at 16:35
    
Just notice you removed $this->{Sub} this is required for other methods in my package. Is this your speed gain? –  jonathanpeppers Jan 28 '11 at 16:50

Summing even numbers is easier done using grep and List::Util:

use List::Util 'sum';
say sum grep { not $_ % 2 } (1 .. 10); // 30

It seems very likely to me that that the code suggested by your question is over-engineering. Unless you can come up with a decent example that cannot be easily solved using the traditional Perl primitives.

share|improve this answer
    
I think I gave you too simple of a problem on this. Although I think we are a little off topic here. We could put 10 devs in a room for an hour and come up with 12 different opinions on functional programming. I don't think this is helpful, as my question is how to optimize my Iterator class (which is very few lines, so little benefit to using an existing perl package over it). –  jonathanpeppers Jan 28 '11 at 14:48
7  
@Jonathan Peppers, The thing is, if you put 10 Perl developers in a room none of them would come close to what you have done. –  tster Jan 28 '11 at 14:52
2  
@Jonathan: I just wanted to be sure that you know the old-school Perl building blocks before writing your own, as the best way to optimize a piece of code is to get rid of it. –  zoul Jan 28 '11 at 14:52
7  
@Jonathon.Peppers, working against the language is going to hurt you in terms of performance, productivity, and learning. Just because Perl was created a long time ago doesn't mean that programming in it hasn't evolved. You can continue to look down on Perl programmers if you want. But none of them would write a slow piece of crap like the thing you wrote. I don't mean to be overly harsh here. But you shouldn't criticize people you know nothing about on the same page on which you are displaying severe ignorance. –  tster Jan 28 '11 at 15:03
1  
@Jonathan.Peppers, if you don't want to consider the possibility that the people who post here trying to help you might possibly know things that you don't know, then what is the point of asking questions here? BTW, my primary language is C#, and I make heavy use of LINQ. And we aren't "outraged" by your implementation so much as your attitude at our suggestion that you use existing Perl libraries that come packaged with most installations of the language. –  tster Jan 28 '11 at 19:27

Have a look at List::Util and List::MoreUtils for utilities that may help you with this. You can even use perl5i for a more modern looking syntax.

Example:

use perl5i::2;

my @nums = (0..100);
my $sumEven = @nums->grep(sub { $_ % 2 == 0 })->reduce(sub { $a+$b });

say $sumEven;
share|improve this answer
    
Helpful, I will check it out. –  jonathanpeppers Jan 28 '11 at 16:39
1  
Additionally, each_array and each_arrayref in that library will generate array iterators for you. –  Ether Jan 28 '11 at 16:56

There is already an array iterator in CPAN, so you can look at its approach if you have not done it yet.

By the way in your code you have:

#set default values
$this->{Array} = @_[1];

I assume you want to say $_[1]. With @_[1] you are requesting an array slice of one element. At the end the result is the same but the semantics isn't. The curious thing is that I was expecting to have an array of one element if I do @_[1] or an error but tested in the debugger and you obtain the scalar (at least in perl 5.10). Perl 6 will go for this behaviour anyway and will not change sigil for accessing elements in arrays or hashes so you are coding 'advanced' Perl ;-)

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah @_[1] is a typo, strange that it still worked. I'll check out your iterator. –  jonathanpeppers Jan 28 '11 at 16:45

Don't unload the stored array. You're copying every element of an array from where it is pointed at by $this->{Array} to the local list @array when you do this:

my @array = @{$this->{Array}};

Also if you know that you are going to stop when you hit undef, then you don't have to even check bounds.

$this->{Sub} = sub { return $this->{Array}[++$this->{Index}]; }

Is all you need. When {Index} gets out of range, it will return undef.

In addition, you can write your expression in Perl like:

$sum += $_ foreach grep { $_ % 2 == 0 } @array;
share|improve this answer
    
I removed the bounds checking as you suggested, this helped performance. –  jonathanpeppers Jan 28 '11 at 18:06

A much simpler Perl iterator:

my @array = (1, 2, 3, 4);
while (my $i = shift @array)
{
    print $i . "\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
It is better to avoid use of $a or $b as variable names –  Zaid Jan 29 '11 at 16:41

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