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I would like to transfer a boost::posix_time::ptime over the network as a boost::int64_t. According to A way to turn boost::posix_time::ptime into an __int64, I can easily define my own epoch and only transfer the time_duration from that reference epoch as a 64 bits integer. But how to convert back to a ptime?

#include <iostream>
#include <cassert>
#include <boost/date_time/posix_time/posix_time.hpp>
#include <boost/date_time/gregorian/greg_month.hpp>

using namespace std;

using boost::posix_time::ptime;
using boost::posix_time::time_duration;
using boost::gregorian::date;

int main(int argc, char ** argv){
    ptime t = boost::posix_time::microsec_clock::local_time();

    // convert to int64_t
    ptime myEpoch(date(1970,boost::gregorian::Jan,1));
    time_duration myTimeFromEpoch = t - myEpoch;
    boost::int64_t myTimeAsInt = myTimeFromEpoch.ticks();

    // convert back to ptime
    ptime test = myEpoch + time_duration(myTimeAsInt);

    assert(test == t);
    return 0;
}

This is not working since the time_duration constructor taking a tick count as argument is private. I am also interested in any other way to simply transfer that ptime over simple data types.

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1  
Is the value return by ticks() portable between machines? You may need to use ticks_per_second() to normalize it. If myEpoch is the same on both ends, why can't you just transfer a 64 bit millisecond epoch timestamp? –  hplbsh Jan 28 '11 at 15:43
    
It's working with millisecond resolution. Could you post your comment as an answer, please? –  tibur Jan 28 '11 at 15:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Working solution with millisecond resolution:

int main(int argc, char ** argv){
    ptime t = boost::posix_time::microsec_clock::local_time();

    // convert to int64_t
    ptime myEpoch(date(1970,boost::gregorian::Jan,1));
    time_duration myTimeFromEpoch = t - myEpoch;
    boost::int64_t myTimeAsInt = myTimeFromEpoch.total_milliseconds();

    // convert back to ptime
    ptime test = myEpoch + boost::posix_time::milliseconds(myTimeAsInt);

    cout << test << endl;
    cout << t << endl;

    time_duration diff = test - t;

    assert(diff.total_milliseconds()==0);
    return 0;
}

Thanks 12a6.

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1  
I dont think this answer works for 32 bit systems. I tried this on a 32 bit system using an epoch of 1901-01-01 00:00:00 and it will not work. Clearly it works for you but the argument to milliseconds() is type long and the return from total_milliseconds() is also type long so you are not losing anything in the implicit cast from int64_t to long. –  mathematician1975 Oct 15 '13 at 10:17

Works with whatever max resolution your boost::datetime library is compiled to (typically micros/nanos):

time_duration time_duration_from_ticks(time_duration::tick_type ticks)
{
    return time_duration(
        0,                                           // hours
        0,                                           // minutes
        ticks / time_duration::ticks_per_second(),   // seconds
        ticks % time_duration::ticks_per_second());  // fractional_seconds
}

(Note that time_duration::tick_type is your int64_t if you have set up boost datetime with only microsecond resolution, which is the default.)

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But, the seconds argument must be 32 bits on my Windows 7 VS2013 compiler. So, the 2038 problem still exists with this solution. –  Dan Nissenbaum Oct 6 at 6:58
    
I must be being dumb, but I don't see why it must be 32 bits -ticks will be 64 bit (even on 32 bit arch). –  Alastair Maw Oct 6 at 12:28
1  
If you look at this particular constructor for time_duration, you'll find that the third parameter is defined as 32 bits. In fact, I've used this constructor and the dates are wrong - exactly as one would expect for the Year 2038 problem. However, it can be done simply and avoid the 2038 problem using milliseconds; see stackoverflow.com/a/26211377/368896 for a working answer. –  Dan Nissenbaum Oct 7 at 2:58

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