Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

There are several other SO questions talking about generics compiling OK w/ Eclipse's compiler but not javac (i.e. Java: Generics handled differenlty in Eclipse and javac and Generics compiles and runs in Eclipse, but doesn't compile in javac) -- however this looks like a slightly different one.

I have an enum class:

public class LogEvent {
   public enum Type {
       // ... values here ...
   }
   ...
}

and I have another class with a method that takes in arbitrary objects of types descended from Enum:

@Override public <E extends Enum<E>> void postEvent(
    Context context, E code, Object additionalData) 
{
    if (code instanceof LogEvent.Type)
    {
        LogEvent.Type scode = (LogEvent.Type)code;
    ...

This works fine in Eclipse, but when I do a clean built with ant, I am getting a pair of errors, one on the instanceof line, the other on the casting line:

443: inconvertible types
    [javac] found   : E
    [javac] required: mypackage.LogEvent.Type
    [javac]         if (code instanceof LogEvent.Type)
    [javac]             ^

445: inconvertible types
    [javac] found   : E
    [javac] required: com.dekaresearch.tools.espdf.LogEvent.Type
    [javac]             LogEvent.Type scode = (LogEvent.Type)code;
    [javac]                                                  ^

Why does this happen, and how can I get around this problem so it will compile properly?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 27 down vote accepted

I don't know why it's happening, but a workaround is easy:

@Override public <E extends Enum<E>> void postEvent(
    Context context, E code, Object additionalData) 
{
    Object tmp = code;
    if (tmp instanceof LogEvent.Type)
    {
        LogEvent.Type scode = (LogEvent.Type)tmp;
    ...

It's ugly, but it works...

share|improve this answer
    
thanks. Why is that ugly? It's simple and has low runtime cost. –  Jason S Jan 28 '11 at 16:07
2  
@Jason S: It's ugly because I can't see why it's required. –  Jon Skeet Jan 28 '11 at 16:10
    
This is a known bug, IIRC. Actually, there dozens of related bugs with none of them fixed yet. –  maaartinus Jan 31 '11 at 11:06
1  
I was about to throw myself out of the window ( hey I'm at ground floor :) Thanks a lot for this one... And the worst I think I've already been fighting for this one few years ago –  Guillaume Jul 16 '12 at 18:13
1  
I think this is the bug (or one of them): bugs.sun.com/view_bug.do?bug_id=6932571 –  Jens Schauder Jun 10 '13 at 15:52

Perhaps it is because you've declared E as something that extends Enum<E>. I can't say I understand it completely, but it looks like it limits the set of types to some subset that can't include LogEvent.Type for some reason. Or maybe it's just a bug in the compiler. I'd be happy if someone could explain it more clearly, but here is what you can do:

public <E extends Enum<?>> void postEvent(E code) 
{
    if (code instanceof LogEvent.Type)
    {
        LogEvent.Type scode = (LogEvent.Type)code;
        ...
    }
    ...

This works and it is more elegant than just casting to an Object.

share|improve this answer
    
it works because "E extends Enum<E>" refers to some specific subclass of Enum (which may not be compatible with LogEvent.Type). whereas "E extends Enum<?>" refers to any class which extends Enum, of which LogEvent.Type is a valid possibility. –  jtahlborn Jan 28 '11 at 16:35
    
@jtahlborn: The E extends Enum<E> is standard boilerplate for any class that properly extends Enum, which all enum classes do, and LogEvent.Type is an enum class, so it should work as well, but there seems to be a bug in javac. –  Jason S Jan 28 '11 at 16:40
    
@jtahlborn, yes, think of it - does LogEvent.Type extend Enum<LogEvent.Type>? Surely it does. But it's exactly what we mean when we write "E extends Enum<E>", with E = LogEvent.Type. So I agree that it looks like a bug in javac. In fact, "E extends Enum<?>" and "E extends Enum<E>" should mean exactly the same thing because any enum type E can only extend Enum<E> and nothing else. –  Sergey Tachenov Jan 28 '11 at 16:53

I had a similar problem and upgraded from jdk1.6.0_16 to jdk1.6.0_23 and it went away without any code changes.

share|improve this answer

In order to use instanceof both operands have to inherit/implement the same class/interface.
E just can't be cast to LogEvent.Type

I don't know what your full method looks like, but this should solve your issue by using interfaces and not Generics.

public interface EventType { }
public class LogEvent  {
    public enum Type implements EventType {}
}

public void postEvent(Context context, EventType code, Object additionalData) {
    if(code instanceof LogEvent.Type) {
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
But I want Enum to be the base type, not EventType. I need my method to accept arbitrary Enum values. –  Jason S Jan 28 '11 at 15:24
    
But why E can't be cast to LogEvent.Type? E is a subclass of Enum, and LogEvent.Type is a subclass of Enum as well. I understand that the problem part is that it's not just Enum, but Enum<E>, I just can't understand what that means exactly. –  Sergey Tachenov Jan 28 '11 at 15:24
    
The other SO questions on this topic seem to indicate that javac has a known bug with recursive generic bounds, so maybe it gets confused. With respect to the <E extends Enum<E>>, if you haven't seen it before: angelikalanger.com/GenericsFAQ/FAQSections/… –  Jason S Jan 28 '11 at 16:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.