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I'm considering simulating all moves, but that can't be the best way to go about it. Suggestions?

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A very specific example of game AI logic in general, I like it. I've toyed with the same question in the idea of writing an AI for Reversi, but never got around to it. Hopefully good answers to come... – David Jan 28 '11 at 16:11
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this is for gamedev.stackexchange.com – Trufa Jan 28 '11 at 19:34
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This is programming related, so it is a welcome question here, but I do agree with @Trufa that you'll probably get better responses on the Game Dev site. I can migrate it if you want. – Bill the Lizard Jan 28 '11 at 19:41
    
@Bill I don't particularly agree it's programming related (I mean i thing it's vaguely related) but it has been up-voted 3 times, so, lets see where it leads. – Trufa Jan 28 '11 at 20:08
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@Trufa: Yeah, it could definitely use more detail. Some example code (even pseudocode) would put it more firmly in the "programming related" category in my mind. – Bill the Lizard Jan 28 '11 at 20:13

"Best" as in least code? most elegant code? least theoretical number of algorithm steps? or best performing in some specific language on some specific hardware platform?

In any case, for such a tiny problem (around 112 possible moves) a brute-force scan is probably the best approach on all of those measures. The one optimization you might consider would be to precompute all of the comparisons necessary. You could write a program that enumerates them and produces a single (large) if statement and then let the compiler optimize that for you. The if statement might look something like ...

if ((cell[0,0] == cell [0,2] && cell[0,0] == cell [0,3]) || ( ...)

Or as I like to say ...

"Never underestimate the power of an Intel CPU to optimize dumb linear algorithms accessing sequential memory locations in tight loops."

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I don't claim to be an expert on this type of problem but thought I'd think it through a little.

The way I would approach this would be to think about how a human would approach the problem. A human wouldn't sit down and go through all possible moves (even incorrect ones). They'd more likely scan the board and look for patterns. You'd have to benchmark this against scanning for all possible moves, which might be faster depending on how you optimize the algorithm and data structures. (in fact, another thing that crossed my mind might be to, as you insert each new jewel into the board, keep some metadata associated with it that would indicate if it has a possible valid move associated with it. The trick would be keeping this updated as more moves were made.)

To better explain my "looking for patterns" approach, consider the following jewel pattern:

(0)

x x 
    x

The above pattern (assuming the x is the color being scanned for) would result in a valid move. You could scan the board and examine each 6x2 and 4x1 area to look for possible moves.

The following patterns would also be candidates:

(1)

    x   
x x

(2)

x   x x

(3)

x x   x

(4)

x
x
  x

(5)

  x
  x
x

(6)

  x
x 
  x

(7)

x
  x
x

(8)

  x
x   x

(9)

x   x
  x

(10)

  x x
x

(11)

x
  x x

(12)

x
  x
  x

(13)

  x
x
x
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I would view this problem more as a weighted set of nodes. Perhaps a little too simplistic, but you have a set of jewel nodes next to each other. If a node does not match one of its adjacent nodes, then it has a value of 0. If it has a 1, then it is matching on one of its surrounding (and that surrounding node would reflect a 1, or possibly more!)

From this weighted system, you would only need to update the nodes that had an adjacent node altered. A 2 should be a good indicator of good things to come, but like the previous answer mentioned, there are patterns involved that can help further optimize this...

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