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I've just started playing with Guice, and a use-case I can think of is that in a test I just want to override a single binding. I think I'd like to use the rest of the production level bindings to ensure everything is setup correctly and to avoid duplication.

So imagine I have the following Module

public class ProductionModule implements Module {
    public void configure(Binder binder) {
        binder.bind(InterfaceA.class).to(ConcreteA.class);
        binder.bind(InterfaceB.class).to(ConcreteB.class);
        binder.bind(InterfaceC.class).to(ConcreteC.class);
    }
}

And in my test I only want to override InterfaceC, while keeping InterfaceA and InterfaceB in tact, so I'd want something like:

Module testModule = new Module() {
    public void configure(Binder binder) {
        binder.bind(InterfaceC.class).to(MockC.class);
    }
};
Guice.createInjector(new ProductionModule(), testModule);

I've also tried the following, with no luck:

Module testModule = new ProductionModule() {
    public void configure(Binder binder) {
        super.configure(binder);
        binder.bind(InterfaceC.class).to(MockC.class);
    }
};
Guice.createInjector(testModule);

Does anyone know if it's possible to do what I want or am I completely barking up the wrong tree??

--- Follow up: It would seem I can achieve what I want if I make use of the @ImplementedBy tag on the interface and then just provide a binding in the test case, which works nicely when there is a 1-1 mapping between the interface and implementation.

Also, after discussing this with a colleague it would seem we'd head down the road of overriding an entire module and ensuring we have our modules defined correctly. This seems like it might cause a problem though where a binding is misplaced in a module and needs to be moved, thus possibly breaking a load of tests as bindings may no longer be available to be overriden.

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2  
Like the phrase "barking up the wrong tree" :D –  Boris Pavlović Jan 27 '09 at 14:34

4 Answers 4

up vote 88 down vote accepted

This might not be the answer you're looking for, but if you're writing unit tests, you probably shouldn't be using an injector and rather be injecting mock or fake objects by hand.

On the other hand, if you really want to replace a single binding, you could use Modules.override(..):

public class ProductionModule implements Module {
    public void configure(Binder binder) {
        binder.bind(InterfaceA.class).to(ConcreteA.class);
        binder.bind(InterfaceB.class).to(ConcreteB.class);
        binder.bind(InterfaceC.class).to(ConcreteC.class);
    }
}
public class TestModule implements Module {
    public void configure(Binder binder) {
        binder.bind(InterfaceC.class).to(MockC.class);
    }
}
Guice.createInjector(Modules.override(new ProductionModule()).with(new TestModule()));

See details here.

But as the javadoc for Modules.overrides(..) recommends, you should design your modules in such a way that you don't need to override bindings. In the example you gave, you could accomplish that by moving the binding of InterfaceC to a separate module.

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4  
Thanks Albert, that gets me someway down the road towards doing what I want. That's in a production release yet tho! And this is for integration tests, not unit tests, which I why I want to ensure everything else is being built correctly –  MrWiggles Feb 10 '09 at 8:58
    
I've added a concrete example to the code. Does it get you further along? –  albertb Feb 11 '09 at 2:42
1  
Unless I'm mistaken, ovveride looses the proper Stage while doing so (i.e. DEVELOPMENT is systematically used). –  pdeschen Mar 27 '14 at 22:37
    
>>>but if you're writing unit tests, you probably shouldn't be using an injector and rather be injecting mock or fake objects by hand.>>> I do not understand that. The all idea of encapsulating creation is to keep it in one place. If one inject by hand rather than by an injector, then if the constructor change you have a problem, you need to propagate that i all the test class that do the creation by hand. –  MaatDeamon Aug 21 '14 at 10:37
2  
@pdeschen That is a bug in Guice 3 that I fixed for Guice 4. –  Tavian Barnes Dec 21 '14 at 18:47

Why not to use inheritance? You can override your specific bindings in overrideMe method, leaving shared implementations in configure method.

public class DevModule implements Module {
    public void configure(Binder binder) {
        binder.bind(InterfaceA.class).to(TestDevImplA.class);
        overrideMe(binder);
    }

    protected void overrideMe(Binder binder){
        binder.bind(InterfaceC.class).to(ConcreteC.class);
    }
};

public class TestModule extends DevModule {
    @Override
    public void overrideMe(Binder binder) {
        binder.bind(InterfaceC.class).to(MockC.class);
    }
}

And finally create your injector this way:

Guice.createInjector(new TestModule());
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The @Override doesn't seem to work. Especially if it's done on a method that @Provides something. –  Sasanka Panguluri Dec 15 '14 at 21:25

If you don't want to change your production module and if you have a default maven-like project structure like

src/test/java/...
src/main/java/...

You can just create a new class ConcreteC in your test directory using the same package as for your original class. Guice will then bind InterfaceC to ConcreteC from your test directory whereas all other interfaces will be bound to your production classes.

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You want to use Juckito where you can declare your custom configuration for each test class.

@RunWith(JukitoRunner.class)
class LogicTest {
    public static class Module extends JukitoModule {

        @Override
        protected void configureTest() {
            bind(InterfaceC.class).to(MockC.class);
        }
    }

    @Inject
    private InterfaceC logic;

    @Test
    public testLogicUsingMock() {
        logic.foo();
    }
}
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