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I'm wanting to output two different views (one as a string that will be sent as an email), and the other the page displayed to a user.

Is this possible in ASP.NET MVC beta?

I've tried multiple examples:

RenderPartial to String in ASP.NET MVC Beta
If I use this example, I receive the "Cannot redirect after HTTP headers have been sent.".

MVC Framework: Capturing the output of a view
If I use this, I seem to be unable to do a redirectToAction, as it tries to render a view that may not exist. If I do return the view, it is completely messed up and doesn't look right at all.

Does anyone have any ideas/solutions to these issues i have, or have any suggestions for better ones?

Many thanks!

Below is an example. What I'm trying to do is create the GetViewForEmail method:

public ActionResult OrderResult(string ref)
{
  //Get the order
  Order order = OrderService.GetOrder(ref);

  //The email helper would do the meat and veg by getting the view as a string
  //Pass the control name (OrderResultEmail) and the model (order)
  string emailView = GetViewForEmail("OrderResultEmail", order);

  //Email the order out
  EmailHelper(order, emailView);
  return View("OrderResult", order);
}

Accepted answer from Tim Scott (changed and formatted a little by me):

public virtual string RenderViewToString(
  ControllerContext controllerContext,
  string viewPath,
  string masterPath,
  ViewDataDictionary viewData,
  TempDataDictionary tempData)
{
  Stream filter = null;
  ViewPage viewPage = new ViewPage();

  //Right, create our view
  viewPage.ViewContext = new ViewContext(controllerContext, new WebFormView(viewPath, masterPath), viewData, tempData);

  //Get the response context, flush it and get the response filter.
  var response = viewPage.ViewContext.HttpContext.Response;
  response.Flush();
  var oldFilter = response.Filter;

  try
  {
      //Put a new filter into the response
      filter = new MemoryStream();
      response.Filter = filter;

      //Now render the view into the memorystream and flush the response
      viewPage.ViewContext.View.Render(viewPage.ViewContext, viewPage.ViewContext.HttpContext.Response.Output);
      response.Flush();

      //Now read the rendered view.
      filter.Position = 0;
      var reader = new StreamReader(filter, response.ContentEncoding);
      return reader.ReadToEnd();
  }
  finally
  {
      //Clean up.
      if (filter != null)
      {
        filter.Dispose();
      }

      //Now replace the response filter
      response.Filter = oldFilter;
  }
}

Example usage

Assuming a call from the controller to get the order confirmation email, passing the Site.Master location.

string myString = RenderViewToString(this.ControllerContext, "~/Views/Order/OrderResultEmail.aspx", "~/Views/Shared/Site.Master", this.ViewData, this.TempData);
share|improve this question
    
Can you add the way you are calling the RenderViewToString method. Thanks –  Jedi Master Spooky Feb 11 '09 at 16:20
    
Sure! I have updated the solution. –  Dan Atkinson Feb 11 '09 at 16:36
1  
How can you use this with a view, that is strongly typed? Ie. how can I feed a model to the page? –  Kjensen Jun 11 '09 at 12:07
    
Can't use this and create JsonResult afterwards, because content type cannot be set after headers have been sent (because Flush sends them). –  Arnis L. Nov 17 '09 at 13:16
    
Because there's no single right answer, I suppose. :) I created a question that was specific to me, but I knew that it would be a widely asked one as well. –  Dan Atkinson Jul 21 '10 at 8:25
show 4 more comments

14 Answers

up vote 280 down vote accepted

Here's what I came up with, and it's working for me. I added the following method(s) to my controller base class. (You can always make these static methods somewhere else that accept a controller as a parameter I suppose)

MVC2 .ascx style

protected string RenderViewToString<T>(string viewPath, T model) {
  ViewData.Model = model;
  using (var writer = new StringWriter()) {
    var view = new WebFormView(viewPath);
    var vdd = new ViewDataDictionary<T>(model);
    var viewCxt = new ViewContext(ControllerContext, view, vdd,
                                new TempDataDictionary(), writer);
    viewCxt.View.Render(viewCxt, writer);
    return writer.ToString();
  }
}

Razor .cshtml style

public string RenderRazorViewToString(string viewName, object model)
{
  ViewData.Model = model;
  using (var sw = new StringWriter())
  {
    var viewResult = ViewEngines.Engines.FindPartialView(ControllerContext,
                                                             viewName);
    var viewContext = new ViewContext(ControllerContext, viewResult.View,
                                 ViewData, TempData, sw);
    viewResult.View.Render(viewContext, sw);
    viewResult.ViewEngine.ReleaseView(ControllerContext, viewResult.View);
    return sw.GetStringBuilder().ToString();
  }
}

Edit: added Razor code.

share|improve this answer
11  
Rendering a view to a string is always "inconsistent with the whole routing concept", as it has nothing to do with routing. I'm not sure why an answer that works got a down vote. –  Ben Lesh Nov 3 '10 at 20:15
3  
Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!! This worked perfectly for what I needed! –  Mike Wills Jan 24 '11 at 16:36
3  
I think you might need to remove the "static" from the Razor version's method declaration, otherwise it can't find ControllerContext et al. –  Mike Jan 14 '12 at 5:10
3  
You'll need to implement your own method of removal for those superfluous whitespaces. The best way I can think of off the top of my head is to load the string into an XmlDocument, then write it back out to a string with an XmlWriter, as per the link I left in my last comment. I really hope that helps. –  Ben Lesh Feb 16 '12 at 14:01
2  
I wish I could give you more than just one upvote for this. Thank you so much! –  Adrian Grigore Apr 12 '12 at 14:06
show 26 more comments

This works for me:

public virtual string RenderView(ViewContext viewContext)
{
    var response = viewContext.HttpContext.Response;
    response.Flush();
    var oldFilter = response.Filter;
    Stream filter = null;
    try
    {
        filter = new MemoryStream();
        response.Filter = filter;
        viewContext.View.Render(viewContext, viewContext.HttpContext.Response.Output);
        response.Flush();
        filter.Position = 0;
        var reader = new StreamReader(filter, response.ContentEncoding);
        return reader.ReadToEnd();
    }
    finally
    {
        if (filter != null)
        {
            filter.Dispose();
        }
        response.Filter = oldFilter;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your comment, but isn't that used for rendering inside a view though? How could I use it in the context I have updated the question with? –  Dan Atkinson Jan 27 '09 at 21:44
    
Actually, no. I'm an idiot! I forgot these two lines would come in handy: ViewPage vp = new ViewPage(); vp.ViewContext = new ViewContext(controllerContext, new WebFormView("~/Views/Orders/OrderResultEmail.aspx", ""), ViewData, null); Many thanks Tim! –  Dan Atkinson Jan 27 '09 at 23:13
    
Does this work with rc0? –  NikolaiDante Jan 29 '09 at 17:03
    
If you mean RC1, I haven't tried it yet, but you're more than welcome to try... :) –  Dan Atkinson Jan 29 '09 at 20:51
    
Sorry, still thinking about Silverlight last year whose first rc was 0. :) I'm giving this a shot today. (As soon as I work out the correct format of the view path) –  NikolaiDante Jan 30 '09 at 8:57
show 6 more comments

I found a new solution that renders a view to string without having to mess with the Response stream of the current HttpContext (which doesn't allow you to change the response's ContentType or other headers).

Basically, all you do is create a fake HttpContext for the view to render itself:

/// <summary>Renders a view to string.</summary>
public static string RenderViewToString(this Controller controller,
                                        string viewName, object viewData) {
    //Create memory writer
    var sb = new StringBuilder();
    var memWriter = new StringWriter(sb);

    //Create fake http context to render the view
    var fakeResponse = new HttpResponse(memWriter);
    var fakeContext = new HttpContext(HttpContext.Current.Request, fakeResponse);
    var fakeControllerContext = new ControllerContext(
        new HttpContextWrapper(fakeContext),
        controller.ControllerContext.RouteData,
        controller.ControllerContext.Controller);

    var oldContext = HttpContext.Current;
    HttpContext.Current = fakeContext;

    //Use HtmlHelper to render partial view to fake context
    var html = new HtmlHelper(new ViewContext(fakeControllerContext,
        new FakeView(), new ViewDataDictionary(), new TempDataDictionary()),
        new ViewPage());
    html.RenderPartial(viewName, viewData);

    //Restore context
    HttpContext.Current = oldContext;    

    //Flush memory and return output
    memWriter.Flush();
    return sb.ToString();
}

/// <summary>Fake IView implementation used to instantiate an HtmlHelper.</summary>
public class FakeView : IView {
    #region IView Members

    public void Render(ViewContext viewContext, System.IO.TextWriter writer) {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    #endregion
}

This works on ASP.NET MVC 1.0, together with ContentResult, JsonResult, etc. (changing Headers on the original HttpResponse doesn't throw the "Server cannot set content type after HTTP headers have been sent" exception).

Update: in ASP.NET MVC 2.0 RC, the code changes a bit because we have to pass in the StringWriter used to write the view into the ViewContext:

//...

//Use HtmlHelper to render partial view to fake context
var html = new HtmlHelper(
    new ViewContext(fakeControllerContext, new FakeView(),
        new ViewDataDictionary(), new TempDataDictionary(), memWriter),
    new ViewPage());
html.RenderPartial(viewName, viewData);

//...

Update 2: I have an expanded blog post about the solution and its differences with the other methods. Here's a second blog post about performance of the different solutions.

share|improve this answer
    
There is no RenderPartial method on the HtmlHelper object. This is not possible - html.RenderPartial(viewName, viewData); –  MartinF Aug 8 '09 at 12:53
    
In ASP.NET MVC release 1.0 there are a couple of RenderPartial extension methods. The one I'm using in particular is System.Web.Mvc.Html.RenderPartialExtensions.RenderPartial(this HtmlHelper, string, object). I'm unaware whether the method has been added in the latest revisions of MVC and wasn't present in earlier ones. –  LorenzCK Aug 8 '09 at 17:42
    
Thanks. Just needed to add the System.Web.Mvc.Html namespace to the using declaration (else html.RenderPartial(..) of course wont be accessible :)) –  MartinF Aug 9 '09 at 11:28
    
Does anyone have this working with the RC of MVC2? They added an additional Textwriter parameter to ViewContext. I tried just adding a new StringWriter(), but it did not work. –  beckelmw Jan 20 '10 at 14:48
1  
@beckelmw: I updated the response. You must pass in the original StringWriter you are using to write to the StringBuilder, not a new instance or the output of the view will be lost. –  LorenzCK Jan 20 '10 at 20:38
show 1 more comment

This answer is not on my way . This is originally from http://stackoverflow.com/a/2759898/2318354 but here I have show the way to use it with "Static" KeyWord to make it common for all Controllers .

For that you have to make "Static" class in Class File . (Suppose your Class File Name is Utils.cs )

This example is For Razor.

Utils.cs

 public static class RazorViewToString
{

    public static string RenderRazorViewToString(this Controller controller, string viewName, object model)
    {

        controller.ViewData.Model = model;
        using (var sw = new StringWriter())
        {
            var viewResult = ViewEngines.Engines.FindPartialView(controller.ControllerContext, viewName);
            var viewContext = new ViewContext(controller.ControllerContext, viewResult.View, controller.ViewData, controller.TempData, sw);
            viewResult.View.Render(viewContext, sw);
            viewResult.ViewEngine.ReleaseView(controller.ControllerContext, viewResult.View);
            return sw.GetStringBuilder().ToString();
        }
    }

}

Now you can call this class from your controller by adding NameSpace in your Controller File as following way by passing "this" as parameter to Controller.

string result = RazorViewToString.RenderRazorViewToString(this ,"ViewName", model);

I hope this will be useful to you make code clean and neat.

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After a little looking around I came across this blog post

http://craftycodeblog.com/2010/05/15/asp-net-mvc-render-partial-view-to-string

In here the author provides a solution by creating a subclass to the Controller.

This isn’t a bad solution except it pollutes your inheritance hierarchy. So I rewrote it as a C# extension method.

This allows you to use the rendering functions without polluting your object hierarchy.

View the code: http://learningdds.com/public/ControllerExtension.cs

share|improve this answer
    
2nd link is dead =( –  Maslow Sep 12 '12 at 15:22
    
If you still have the code, you could always post it as a GitHub gist or Pastebin or some such. –  rstackhouse Jul 16 '13 at 15:11
    
Yeah, sorry about that. I'll have a look tonight and see if I can find the code. It should be kicking about in an archive somewhere. If not I can always do it again. –  Craig Norton Jul 17 '13 at 16:02
add comment

I am using MVC 1.0 RTM and none of the above solutions worked for me. But this one did:

Public Function RenderView(ByVal viewContext As ViewContext) As String

    Dim html As String = ""

    Dim response As HttpResponse = HttpContext.Current.Response

    Using tempWriter As New System.IO.StringWriter()

        Dim privateMethod As MethodInfo = response.GetType().GetMethod("SwitchWriter", BindingFlags.NonPublic Or BindingFlags.Instance)

        Dim currentWriter As Object = privateMethod.Invoke(response, BindingFlags.NonPublic Or BindingFlags.Instance Or BindingFlags.InvokeMethod, Nothing, New Object() {tempWriter}, Nothing)

        Try
            viewContext.View.Render(viewContext, Nothing)
            html = tempWriter.ToString()
        Finally
            privateMethod.Invoke(response, BindingFlags.NonPublic Or BindingFlags.Instance Or BindingFlags.InvokeMethod, Nothing, New Object() {currentWriter}, Nothing)
        End Try

    End Using

    Return html

End Function
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If you want to forgo MVC entirely, thereby avoiding all the HttpContext mess...

string razorText = System.IO.File.ReadAllText(razorTemplateFileLocation);
string emailBody = Razor.Parse(razorText, myViewModel);

This uses the awesome open source Razor Engine here: https://github.com/Antaris/RazorEngine

share|improve this answer
    
Nice! Do you know if there's a similar parsing engine for WebForms syntax? I still have some old WebForms views that can't be moved to Razor quite yet. –  Dan Atkinson Sep 19 '13 at 7:48
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I met the same problem with creating report. After trying all above solution, I met some exception related to the HTTP header. It does not allow me to redirect to action or return any ActionResult later.

However, I found another way to solve. Please go to this article on my blog: http://trandangkhoa.blogspot.com/2009/05/asp-net-mvc-print-excel-file-using-aspx.html

The idea is very simple: using HttpClient to get HTML content from the view:

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I saw an implementation for MVC 3 and Razor from another website, it worked for me:

    public static string RazorRender(Controller context, string DefaultAction)
    {
        string Cache = string.Empty;
        System.Text.StringBuilder sb = new System.Text.StringBuilder();
        System.IO.TextWriter tw = new System.IO.StringWriter(sb); 

        RazorView view_ = new RazorView(context.ControllerContext, DefaultAction, null, false, null);
        view_.Render(new ViewContext(context.ControllerContext, view_, new ViewDataDictionary(), new TempDataDictionary(), tw), tw);

        Cache = sb.ToString(); 

        return Cache;

    } 

    public static string RenderRazorViewToString(string viewName, object model)
    {

        ViewData.Model = model;
        using (var sw = new StringWriter())
        {
            var viewResult = ViewEngines.Engines.FindPartialView(ControllerContext, viewName);
            var viewContext = new ViewContext(ControllerContext, viewResult.View, ViewData, TempData, sw);
            viewResult.View.Render(viewContext, sw);
            return sw.GetStringBuilder().ToString();
        }
    } 

    public static class HtmlHelperExtensions
    {
        public static string RenderPartialToString(ControllerContext context, string partialViewName, ViewDataDictionary viewData, TempDataDictionary tempData)
        {
            ViewEngineResult result = ViewEngines.Engines.FindPartialView(context, partialViewName);

            if (result.View != null)
            {
                StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
                using (StringWriter sw = new StringWriter(sb))
                {
                    using (HtmlTextWriter output = new HtmlTextWriter(sw))
                    {
                        ViewContext viewContext = new ViewContext(context, result.View, viewData, tempData, output);
                        result.View.Render(viewContext, output);
                    }
                }
                return sb.ToString();
            } 

            return String.Empty;

        }

    }

More on Razor render- MVC3 View Render to String

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, this is actually more or less a copy of the accepted answer. :) –  Dan Atkinson May 22 '12 at 9:52
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The Razor-Version of this solution does no longer work with MVC5. You get a string containing funny placeholder markup (with $ signs etc).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the update. –  Dan Atkinson Sep 9 '13 at 7:53
add comment

Do i understand correct if you want to do something like this: When the user does something he should get an email and a text on the screen?

Then why don't the model send the email? Why would you need the email to be sent to a view?

share|improve this answer
    
Richard, I'm getting the email from the view because the view is made up of collection of the same partials as the one that's on the screen, and I'd rather not duplicate two sets of HTML. –  Dan Atkinson Jan 27 '09 at 12:12
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I would create a new View class deriving from the original view and overriding the ouput method.

share|improve this answer
    
Do you know of any examples of this? –  Dan Atkinson Jan 27 '09 at 12:27
    
Haven't done anything like it in MVC. It's just a basic idea of how this could be solved. –  Drejc Jan 27 '09 at 14:14
    
Thanks. I've looked for something more specific on this, but haven't found anything that could possibly be near a solution. –  Dan Atkinson Jan 27 '09 at 14:18
add comment

Quick tip

For a strongly typed Model just add it to the ViewData.Model property before passing to RenderViewToString. e.g

this.ViewData.Model = new OrderResultEmailViewModel(order);
string myString = RenderViewToString(this.ControllerContext, "~/Views/Order/OrderResultEmail.aspx", "~/Views/Shared/Site.Master", this.ViewData, this.TempData);
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To repeat from a more unknown question, take a look at MvcIntegrationTestFramework.

It makes saves you writing your own helpers to stream result and is proven to work well enough. I'd assume this would be in a test project and as a bonus you would have the other testing capabilities once you've got this setup. Main bother would probably be sorting out the dependency chain.

 private static readonly string mvcAppPath = 
     Path.GetFullPath(AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory 
     + "\\..\\..\\..\\MyMvcApplication");
 private readonly AppHost appHost = new AppHost(mvcAppPath);

    [Test]
    public void Root_Url_Renders_Index_View()
    {
        appHost.SimulateBrowsingSession(browsingSession => {
            RequestResult result = browsingSession.ProcessRequest("");
            Assert.IsTrue(result.ResponseText.Contains("<!DOCTYPE html"));
        });
}
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