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Let f be an arithmetic function and A={k1,k2,...,kn} are integers in increasing order.

Now I want to start with k1 and compare f(ki) with f(k1). If f(ki)>f(k1), put ki as k1.

Now start with ki, and compare f(kj) with f(ki), for j>i. If f(kj)>f(ki), put kj as ki, and repeat this procedure.

At the end we will have a sub sequence B={L1,...,Lm} of A by this property:

L1=k1
L2=ki
L3=kj
...

where

f(L(i+1))>f(L(i)), for any 1<=i<=m-1

For example, let f be the divisor function of integers.

I think there should be some way to do more efficient and faster than I did.

Do you know how to write a code for my purpose in Mathematica or Matlab.

Mathematica is preferable.

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I have written a code for this program with Mathematica, and it take some hours to compute f of ki's or the set B for large numbers.

Here I put some part of my code and this is just a sample and the question in my program could be more larger than these:

the space between g's are product. for example:

g[67757] g[353]=g[67757]*g[353]

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f[n_] := DivisorSigma[0, n];
g[n_] := Product[Prime[i], {i, 1, PrimePi[n]}];

k1 = g[67757] g[353] g[59] g[19] g[11] g[7] g[5]^2 6^3 2^7;
k2 = g[67757] g[353] g[59] g[19] g[11] g[7] g[5] 6^5 2^7;
k3 = g[67757] g[359] g[53] g[19] g[11] g[7] g[5] 6^4 2^7;
k4 = g[67759] g[349] g[53] g[19] g[11] g[7] g[5] 6^5 2^6;
k5 = g[67757] g[359] g[53] g[19] g[11] g[7] g[5] 6^4 2^8;
k6 = g[67759] g[349] g[53] g[19] g[11] g[7] g[5]^2 6^3 2^7;
k7 = g[67757] g[359] g[53] g[19] g[11] g[7] g[5] 6^5 2^6;
k8 = g[67757] g[359] g[53] g[19] g[11] g[7] g[5] 6^4 2^9;
k9 = g[67757] g[359] g[53] g[19] g[11] g[7] g[5]^2 6^3 2^7;
k10 = g[67757] g[359] g[53] g[19] g[11] g[7] g[5] 6^5 2^7;
k11 = g[67759] g[349] g[53] g[19] g[11] g[7] g[5]^2 6^4 2^6;
k12 = g[67757] g[359] g[53] g[19] g[11] g[7] g[5]^2 6^3 2^8;
k13 = g[67757] g[359] g[53] g[19] g[11] g[7] g[5]^2 6^4 2^6;
k14 = g[67757] g[359] g[53] g[19] g[11] g[7] g[5]^2 6^3 2^9;
k15 = g[67757] g[359] g[53] g[19] g[11] g[7] g[5]^2 6^4 2^7;
k16 = g[67757] g[359] g[53] g[23] g[11] g[7] g[5] 6^4 2^8;
k17 = g[67757] g[359] g[59] g[19] g[11] g[7] g[5] 6^4 2^7;
k18 = g[67757] g[359] g[53] g[23] g[11] g[7] g[5] 6^4 2^9;
k19 = g[67759] g[353] g[53] g[19] g[11] g[7] g[5] 6^4 2^6;
k20 = g[67763] g[347] g[53] g[19] g[11] g[7] g[5] 6^4 2^7;

k = Table[k1, k2, k3, k4, k5, k6, k7, k8, k9, k10, k11, k12, k13, k14, k15, k16, k17, k18, k19, k20];

i = 1;
count = 0;
For[j = i, j <= 20, j++, 
  If[f[k[[j]]] - f[k[[i]]] > 0, i = j; Print["k",i];
   count = count + 1]];

Print["count= ", count]

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share|improve this question
    
Could show what have you done already? –  Elalfer Jan 28 '11 at 17:20
    
I put the code here –  asd Jan 28 '11 at 18:25
    
Do not forget to format your code please –  Elalfer Jan 28 '11 at 18:59
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3 Answers 3

DivisorSigma has to factor the numbers (it has no idea how they were constructed). You can speed this substantially by removing the gcd of the list. In detail:

Compute new list as old list / gcd.

Factor the gcd.

Use a function that, given a pair of integers in factored form, merges the factorization (so you have their product in factored form).

Then for any two elements in the reduced list, you compare by merging their factorizations each with that of the gcd, and invoking a function to compute the number of divisors when given the factored form. That last is simply the product of the exponents each increased by one.

In code:

kgcd = GCD @@ k;
newk = k/kgcd;
gcdfacs = FactorInteger[kgcd];

sumDivisors[faclist_] := Times @@ (1 + faclist[[All, 2]])

mergeFactorLists[fl1_, fl2_] := 
 Flatten[GatherBy[Join[fl1, fl2], First] /.
{{p1_Integer,e1_Integer}, {p1_,e2_Integer}} -> {{p1,e1+e2}}, 1]

f2[v1_] := sumDivisors[mergeFactorLists[FactorInteger[v1], gcdfacs]]

Here is your example, with f2 applied to elements of newk.

Timing[i = 1;
  count = 0;
  For[j = i, j <= 20, j++,
    If[f2[newk[[j]]] - f2[newk[[i]]] > 0, i = j; Print["k", i];
      count = count + 1]];
  Print["count= ", count]]

During evaluation of In[140]:= k2

During evaluation of In[140]:= k5

During evaluation of In[140]:= k7

During evaluation of In[140]:= k8

During evaluation of In[140]:= k9

During evaluation of In[140]:= k10

During evaluation of In[140]:= k12

During evaluation of In[140]:= k13

During evaluation of In[140]:= k14

During evaluation of In[140]:= k15

During evaluation of In[140]:= k16

During evaluation of In[140]:= k17

During evaluation of In[140]:= k18

During evaluation of In[140]:= count= 13

Out[140]= {0.539918, Null}

As others commented, you might instead want to do SortBy or perhaps

sortedk = k[[Ordering[newk, All, f2[#1] < f2[#2] &]]];

--update 2011-02-01--

Here are the various requested function, made to operate on integers represented as lists of their prime factors and corresponding powers. We use utility functions to "multiply" two or more such representations, so that they are easily constructed from the definition for g[] above.

logarithm[fl_] := fl[[All,2]] . Log[fl[[All,1]]]

divSigma[k_, fax_] := Times @@
  ((fax[[All, 1]]^(k*(fax[[All, 2]] + 1)) - 1)/(fax[[All, 1]]^k - 1))

mergeFactorLists[f1_,f2_,f3__] := 
  mergeFactorLists[mergeFactorLists[f1,f2],f3]

mergeFactorLists[fl1_, fl2_] := 
  Flatten[GatherBy[Join[fl1, fl2], First] /.
    {{p1_Integer,e1_Integer}, {p1_,e2_Integer}} -> {{p1,e1+e2}}, 1]

eulerPhi[fl_] := 
 Times @@ ((fl[[All, 1]] - 1)*fl[[All, 1]]^(fl[[All, 2]] - 1))

I use factorlist in a manner similar to use of g[] above, but to obtain the factored lists rather than the integer itself. For ease of converting code, you might do as below.

g[n__] := factorList[n]

Then you would construct k1 et al as:

k1 = mergeFactorLists[g[67757], g[353], g[59], g[19], g[11], g[7], 
  g[5, 2], g[4, 3], g[2, 7]];

I remark that it might be better to use indexing e.g. k[1], k[2], etc. This way you can store the index instead of the number (whether represented as a factored list or fully expanded). This was a concern in either your comments or private email, I'm not sure.

Here is a short example to indicate that the functions might be working as advertised.

In[77]:= example = mergeFactorLists[g[59], g[19], g[11], g[7], g[5, 2], g[4, 3], g[2, 7]] Out[77]= {{2, 16}, {3, 9}, {5, 6}, {7, 4}, {11, 3}, {13, 2}, {17, 2}, {19, 2}, {23, 1}, {29, 1}, {31, 1}, {37, 1}, {41, 1}, {43, 1}, {47, 1}, {53, 1}, {59, 1}}

In[83]:= divSigma[2, example] Out[83]= 8309625653259163198663074449058595410045270294408417958734031\ 0136565010401600000000

In[92]:= eulerPhi[example] Out[92]= 30117106786279162451552137484697600000000

In[95]:= examplenumber = Times @@ Map[#[[1]]^#[[2]] &, example] Out[95]= 225123336762006539948611826706656256000000

In[99]:= DivisorSigma[2, examplenumber] Out[99]= 8309625653259163198663074449058595410045270294408417958734031\ 0136565010401600000000

In[100]:= EulerPhi[examplenumber] Out[100]= 30117106786279162451552137484697600000000

--end update--

Daniel Lichtblau Wolfram Research

share|improve this answer
    
@Daniel Note that your sorting method returns (of course) a list with 20 items, while the OP's method returns 13. I think the OP's sort is flawed, unless he is NOT wanting to sort the list. The question is not very clear, I think. –  belisarius Jan 28 '11 at 23:05
    
@belisarius (and asd) I also was not sure what was supposed to be the result. For the subsequence I'd guess a construct such as Reap[For[...Sow...]...]] would be best. –  Daniel Lichtblau Jan 29 '11 at 23:29
    
@asd You can use this approach for larger data sets. The key is to keep the values in factored form (lists of primes and their associated nonzero powers). The DivisorSigma function is multiplicative, so from this form (for a number n) it is easy to obtain the same value as DivisorSigma[k,n] with modest code. It will be hugely faster than DivisorSigma, as that first must factor its input. Regarding the (n*Log[n]) denominator, you can get away with low precision numerical approximations most of the time. You'd only need to resort to full precision when a tie occurs at low precision. –  Daniel Lichtblau Jan 29 '11 at 23:35
    
@asd You can define your own divisor sigma function to take the factored form of the integer as below. I compare with k=3, n=6666 with the built-in DivisorSigma. Can reach me at danl@wolfram.com In[43]:= divSigma[k_, fax_] := Times @@ ((fax[[All, 1]]^(k*(fax[[All, 2]] + 1)) - 1)/(fax[[All, 1]]^k - 1))In[44]:= divSigma[3, FactorInteger[6666]] Out[44]= 345835290528 In[36]:= DivisorSigma[3, 6666] Out[36]= 345835290528 –  Daniel Lichtblau Jan 30 '11 at 3:11
    
Aaacck. Can anyone please tell me how to post comments using newlines/carriage-returns/enter? It is difficult enough to format on an HP laptop that has limited contrast between letters and keyboard, without having comments posted prematurely due to use of enter for line spacing. (I did not see the answer to this in the FAQ, Apologies if I missed it.) –  Daniel Lichtblau Jan 30 '11 at 3:19
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On my version of mathematica, most of the calculation time is spent applying the function f[n]. Even just f[k1] takes a few seconds.

In any case, what you want to do is use SortBy. This will take a list and a function as arguments. It applies the function to every member of the list and sorts them in order from least-to-greatest, so you'll need to swap the list around to greatest-to-least. Remember to use k = List[k1, k2, ... , k20] instead of k = Table[k1, k2, ... , k20] and you should be good.

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Part of the reason why this is so slow is because you're using for's and if's in Mathematica. Neither are particularly fast.

Ordinarily it's recommended to try doing some list operation, as this is MUCH faster. I'm not sure how you could accomplish this off hand, but you may want to look into it.

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At very least Do loops should be used instead of For loops if you wish to retain the imperative style. They are significantly faster. –  Searke Jan 28 '11 at 22:32
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