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I'm doing some work with CSS, and I have an <li> element with a <div> element inside of it. The <div> element assumes the width of the enclosing <li> element, but the text content inside the <div> is wider than the <li> (and therefore goes onto two lines). What I want to do is make the <div> the same width as its longest text element, does anyone know how I can do this? Thanks.

<ul style="display: inline-block; list-item-style: none">
  <li id="foo" style="float: left; list-style-type: none; position: relative;">
    <a href="...">brief text</a>
    <div id="bar" style="position: absolute; width=???">
      <ul>
        <li>a long chunk of text</li>
        <li>an even longer piece of text</li>
      </ul>
    </div>
  </li>
</ul>

Right now, the width of div#bar is equal to 100% of the width of its enclosing element, li#foo, and the width of li#foo is equal to the width of the text in its <a> tag (plus padding and borders). What I want to do is make div#bar be the width of <li>an even longer piece of text</li>, but I can't figure out how to accomplish that, even with Javascript.... or am I going to be forced to use an absolute measurement for the width? Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

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Is there a reason why div#bar has absolute positioning? –  Matt H. Jan 28 '11 at 18:23

7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Strip out the position attributes from #foo and #bar.

Then add:

<style type="text/css">
#bar li { white-space:nowrap !important; }
</style>
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+1 for clean solution, and paying attention to the OP wanting it to grow with content. –  Brad Christie Jan 28 '11 at 18:05
    
Thank you. Not quite sure what those position attributes were doing there in the first place. –  jay Jan 28 '11 at 20:03

put !important after the style value before ;

Sample:

#element{ width:500px!important;}
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try

width:500px instead of width=500px (replace 500 with desired width)

http://jsfiddle.net/p4YNA/

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<ul style="display: inline-block; list-item-style: none">
  <li id="foo" style="float: left; list-style-type: none; position: relative;">
 <a href="...">brief text</a>
 <div id="bar" style="float:left;">
   <ul>
  <li>a long chunk of text</li>
  <li>an even longer piece of text</li>
   </ul>
 </div>
  </li>
</ul>
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If you can remove the display: inline-block from the outer <ul/> and remove float: left from the foo <li/> then the list will expand to the longest element.

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A solution could be to use a fixed width for the #bar. A second solution is to remove position:absolute; from #bar.

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According to the specification, you can can't (see edit) overide it by using a combination of rules that is stronger than the element style.

Element style (style="XXX") = 1000
Id (#id)                    = 100
Class (.class)              = 10
element (ie: p)             = 1

So if you are able to specify a css rule with more than 1000, I think you could do it.

EDIT: After some test, if found that a style defined directly in an element can't be overiden by css with this method. Sorry.

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You can also use !important to override which basically resets the weight attribute and is now only competing against other "!important" styles. –  Brad Christie Jan 28 '11 at 18:07

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