Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Based on a bit of fiddling with the console, it appears that the two are equivalent:

var parent = $("p");

// option 1
var children = parent.children("a");

// option 2
var children = $("a", parent);

Is one preferable to the other for some reason? Are they functionally different, or only syntactically?

share|improve this question
1  
As someone who's not too familiar with jQuery, my preference would be towards the first one simply because it's more readable/understandable. That is, of course, assuming that they are the same functionally. –  Mansoor Siddiqui Jan 28 '11 at 18:33
1  
Those are not equivalent selectors. –  mVChr Jan 28 '11 at 18:35
add comment

3 Answers

These are not the same thing. children will only return immediate children. Option 2 is like find, it will search the entire depth of the context tree.

share|improve this answer
    
Haha, you beat me. The second one is indeed like find. So those two WOULD be equivalent. And THEN I would prefer the option with two parameters instead of find. Because it makes it shorter and is still very good readable. –  Marnix Jan 28 '11 at 18:37
    
in that case you should probably also read this article: brandonaaron.net/blog/2009/06/24/… –  Zathrus Writer Jan 28 '11 at 19:12
add comment

They are actually different because

var children = parent.children("a");

will only give immediate children, whereas

var children = $("a", parent);

will actually give all descendants. The latter expression is the exact equivalent of

var children = parent.find("a");

The documentation actually says explicitly

Internally, selector context is implemented with the .find() method, so $('span', this) is equivalent to $(this).find('span').

Selector context (run this selector but only within a given document, element, or jQuery object) is very useful to know about, but I would say that it is slightly less readable.

share|improve this answer
    
is there any difference with $("p > a") then, besides that parent is now hardcoded, instead of a variable? –  Caspar Kleijne Jan 28 '11 at 18:41
    
@Caspar -- $("p>a") will select children (1st level descendants) while $("p a") will select all descendants. Those are good approaches; the speed will depend in part on how specific you can be in the selector you build. For example $("#" + parent.id + ">a") would be a fast selector since it uses ID -- but it will only work if the parent element actually has an ID. –  JacobM Jan 28 '11 at 19:23
add comment

The two options are not equivalent. Here's why:

Option 2 uses selector context which behind the scenes is actually using find():

Internally, selector context is implemented with the .find() method, so $('span', this) is equivalent to $(this).find('span').

(emphasis mine)

The equivalent would be:

parent.find("a");

The difference between children() and find() is as follows:

The .find() and .children() methods are similar, except that the latter only travels a single level down the DOM tree.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.