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I implemented a solution to the problem below in Mathematica, but it takes a very long time (hours) to compute f of kis or the set B for large numbers.

Somebody suggested that implementing this in C++ resulted in a solution in less than 10 minutes. Would C++ be a good language to learn to solve these problems, or can my Mathematica code be improved to fix the performance issues?

I don't know anything about C or C++ and it should be difficult to start to learn this languages. I prefer to improve or write new code in mathematica.

Problem Description

Let $f$ be an arithmetic function and A={k1,k2,...,kn} are integers in increasing order.

Now I want to start with k1 and compare f(ki) with f(k1). If f(ki)>f(k1), put ki as k1.

Now start with ki, and compare f(kj) with f(ki), for j>i. If f(kj)>f(ki), put kj as ki, and repeat this procedure.

At the end we will have a sub sequence B={L1,...,Lm} of A by this property: f(L(i+1))>f(L(i)), for any 1<=i<=m-1

For example, let f is the divisor function of integers.

Here I put some part of my code and this is just a sample and the question in my program could be more larger than these:

««««««««««««««««««««««««««««««««««««

f[n_] := DivisorSigma[0, n];

g[n_] := Product[Prime[i], {i, 1, PrimePi[n]}];


k1 = g[67757] g[353] g[59] g[19] g[11] g[7] g[5]^2 6^3 2^7;

k2 = g[67757] g[353] g[59] g[19] g[11] g[7] g[5] 6^5 2^7;

k3 = g[67757] g[359] g[53] g[19] g[11] g[7] g[5] 6^4 2^7;

k4 = g[67759] g[349] g[53] g[19] g[11] g[7] g[5] 6^5 2^6;

k5 = g[67757] g[359] g[53] g[19] g[11] g[7] g[5] 6^4 2^8;

k6 = g[67759] g[349] g[53] g[19] g[11] g[7] g[5]^2 6^3 2^7;

k7 = g[67757] g[359] g[53] g[19] g[11] g[7] g[5] 6^5 2^6;

k8 = g[67757] g[359] g[53] g[19] g[11] g[7] g[5] 6^4 2^9;

k9 = g[67757] g[359] g[53] g[19] g[11] g[7] g[5]^2 6^3 2^7;

k10 = g[67757] g[359] g[53] g[19] g[11] g[7] g[5] 6^5 2^7;

k11 = g[67759] g[349] g[53] g[19] g[11] g[7] g[5]^2 6^4 2^6;

k12 = g[67757] g[359] g[53] g[19] g[11] g[7] g[5]^2 6^3 2^8;

k13 = g[67757] g[359] g[53] g[19] g[11] g[7] g[5]^2 6^4 2^6;

k14 = g[67757] g[359] g[53] g[19] g[11] g[7] g[5]^2 6^3 2^9;

k15 = g[67757] g[359] g[53] g[19] g[11] g[7] g[5]^2 6^4 2^7;

k16 = g[67757] g[359] g[53] g[23] g[11] g[7] g[5] 6^4 2^8;

k17 = g[67757] g[359] g[59] g[19] g[11] g[7] g[5] 6^4 2^7;

k18 = g[67757] g[359] g[53] g[23] g[11] g[7] g[5] 6^4 2^9;

k19 = g[67759] g[353] g[53] g[19] g[11] g[7] g[5] 6^4 2^6;

k20 = g[67763] g[347] g[53] g[19] g[11] g[7] g[5] 6^4 2^7;

k = Table[k1, k2, k3, k4, k5, k6, k7, k8, k9, k10, k11, k12, k13, k14, k15, k16, k17, k18, k19, k20];

i = 1;

count = 0;

For[j = i, j <= 20, j++, 
  If[f[k[[j]]] - f[k[[i]]] > 0, i = j; Print["k",i];
   count = count + 1]];

Print["count= ", count]

««««««««««««««««««

the result is:

k2

k5

k7

k8

k9

k10

k12

k13

k14

k15

k16

k17

k18

count=13

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migrated from programmers.stackexchange.com Jan 28 '11 at 19:06

This question came from our site for professional programmers interested in conceptual questions about software development.

3  
It sounds like you have a performance problem with your existing implementation. I suggest you post your existing code to StackOverflow.com and ask for suggestions on improving it. It's a kind of question that belongs there rather than here. –  Anna Lear Jan 28 '11 at 16:59
    
I attempted to edit the question to make it a bit more clear and readable. I still think it should be migrated to SO, but it might have a better chance to survive in this form. Feel free to revert if my edits are harmful. –  Anna Lear Jan 28 '11 at 18:21
    
Implementing the same algorithm in C++ won't probably be any faster. Mathematica is already quite fast. –  devoured elysium Jan 28 '11 at 19:11
    
Your Table[...] usage is wrong; you want List[k1, k2...] –  Tim Kemp Jan 28 '11 at 20:40
    
Could you please explain a little bit what you are trying to achieve? Your example functions seem a little weird. Are those the real ones your are dealing with? –  belisarius Jan 28 '11 at 21:45

1 Answer 1

Most of the time in your code is spent in DivisorSigma because it needs to factor your integers. But it only needs to factor them because you have already multiplied them together and lost the information.

But immediate fix for your problem is to precompute f[k[[i]]].

k = List[k1, k2, k3, k4, k5, k6, k7, k8, k9, k10, k11, k12, k13, k14, 
   k15, k16, k17, k18, k19, k20];
fk = ParallelMap[f, k]; (* precompute *)

i = 1;
count = 0;
For[j = i, j <= 20, j++, 
  If[fk[[j]] - fk[[i]] > 0, i = j; Print["k", i];
   count = count + 1]];
Print["count= ", count]
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