Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am storing values in a std::map

I am finding two values in the map, and I want to iterate between the first through to the last item - however the <= operator is not implemented, so I can't do somethimng like this:

    void foobar(const DatedRecordset& recs, const double startstamp, const double endtstamp)
    {
        DatedRecordsetConstIter start_iter = recs.lower_bound(startstamp), end_iter = recs.lower_bound(endtstamp);

        // Can't do this .... (<= not defined)
        //for (DatedRecordsetConstIter cit = start_iter; cit <= end_iter; cit++ )

        / So have to resort to a hack like this:
        for (DatedRecordsetConstIter cit = start_iter; cit != recs.end(); cit++ ) {
            if ((*cit).first <= (*end_iter).first){
               //do something;
            }
            else
               break;
            }
       }
}

Is there a more elegant way of iterating between two known iterators?

share|improve this question
    
You can use cit != (end_iter + 1). –  Christian Ammer Jan 28 '11 at 20:35
1  
That will not work for an std::map<T>::iterator; it doesn't have a + operator defined. Using something like boost::next would work, though, assuming that end_iter is not recs.end() (the original specification would be invalid in that case, though, anyway). –  Jeremiah Willcock Jan 28 '11 at 20:37
    
@Jeremiah Willcock: You are right, but the ++ operator can do the trick new_end_iter = end_iter++. –  Christian Ammer Jan 28 '11 at 21:05
    
Are you sure you didn't want ++end_iter? You want the next iterator after end_iter to be the != bound on the loop. –  Jeremiah Willcock Jan 28 '11 at 21:06
    
@Jeremiah Willcock: Yes exactly, thank you for the note, I corrected my answer below. –  Christian Ammer Jan 28 '11 at 21:15

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use != instead of <= and it will do what you want it to do.

void foobar(const DatedRecordset& recs, const double startstamp, const double endtstamp)
{
    DatedRecordsetConstIter start_iter = recs.lower_bound(startstamp),
                            end_iter = recs.upper_bound(endtstamp);

    for (DatedRecordsetConstIter cit = start_iter; cit != end_iter; ++cit) {
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This has an off-by-one problem relative to the original code: in this version, cit will never be equal to end_iter within the loop, while the original code has cit == end_iter in the last iteration because of the use of <=. –  Jeremiah Willcock Jan 28 '11 at 20:35
    
I think using upper_bound to compute end_iter will do the trick. –  Mark B Jan 28 '11 at 20:39
    
@Jeremiah That is true. I changed end_iter to use upper_bound per @Mark. –  Judge Maygarden Jan 28 '11 at 20:41

There isn't a <= operator for std::map<>::iterator, but using != on end_iter should do basically the same thing. If you want to include the end iterator itself in the iteration, use something like a do loop to do the != test at the end.

share|improve this answer
struct ManipulateMatchingPairs {
    template<class K, class V>
    void operator()(const std::pair<K,V>& p) const {
        // do with p.second as you please here.
    }
};

// ...
std::for_each(start_iter, end_iter, ManipulateMatchingPairs());
share|improve this answer
    
The mapped type can be written in code: DatedRecordset::mapped_type . But I think this approach misses any item(s) (if a multimap) equal to the end_iter. –  Mark B Jan 28 '11 at 20:41
    
I'm not following you. The end_iter always points at one-past-the-last-element. –  wilhelmtell Jan 28 '11 at 20:47

You have to use the != operator. I believe this is because a std::map isn't necessarily contiguous in memory (so the <= operator wouldn't make much sense, whereas a std::vector would), I could be wrong though

share|improve this answer

The STL for_each algorithm also will not include the ending iterator in the loop. You could always increcment end_iter and just use for_each so that it will be included, though.

 void foobar(const DatedRecordset& recs, 
             const double startstamp, 
             const double endtstamp)
{
    DatedRecordsetConstIter start_iter = recs.lower_bound(startstamp);
    DatedRecordsetConstIter end_iter = recs.lower_bound(endtstamp);
    if(end_iter != recs.end())
      ++end_iter;

    for_each(start_iter, end_iter, []()
       {
           //do something inside the lambda.
       });
}

Something like that maybe? I didn't give it a compile check ...

share|improve this answer

If you want to include the end iterator in the loop, you can increment your end-condition iterator ++end_iter. After that the loop with cit != end_iter does the same as you intend to do with cit <= end_iter before incrementing.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.